Hot Best Seller

An Introduction to Japanese Court Poetry

Availability: Ready to download

The poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350 is one of the great literatures of the world. The present volume, an introduction to that literature, is at once a condensation, a reorganization, and an extension (to A.D. 1500) of Japanese Court Poetry (1961), by the author and Robert H. Brower, the standard treatment of the subject is in English The poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350 is one of the great literatures of the world. The present volume, an introduction to that literature, is at once a condensation, a reorganization, and an extension (to A.D. 1500) of Japanese Court Poetry (1961), by the author and Robert H. Brower, the standard treatment of the subject is in English. The book's five central chapters are devoted to the major court poets and their work; other chapters deal with the forms, assumptions, and themes of court poetry. The author's emphasis throughout is on the human and cultural values of this poetic tradition. Over 150 poems are included in both transliteration and translation. Many of the translations are joint efforts with Professor Bower; others are new translations by the author. The approach to the poems is essentially critical, and draws on the findings of recent Japanese scholarship.


Compare

The poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350 is one of the great literatures of the world. The present volume, an introduction to that literature, is at once a condensation, a reorganization, and an extension (to A.D. 1500) of Japanese Court Poetry (1961), by the author and Robert H. Brower, the standard treatment of the subject is in English The poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350 is one of the great literatures of the world. The present volume, an introduction to that literature, is at once a condensation, a reorganization, and an extension (to A.D. 1500) of Japanese Court Poetry (1961), by the author and Robert H. Brower, the standard treatment of the subject is in English. The book's five central chapters are devoted to the major court poets and their work; other chapters deal with the forms, assumptions, and themes of court poetry. The author's emphasis throughout is on the human and cultural values of this poetic tradition. Over 150 poems are included in both transliteration and translation. Many of the translations are joint efforts with Professor Bower; others are new translations by the author. The approach to the poems is essentially critical, and draws on the findings of recent Japanese scholarship.

30 review for An Introduction to Japanese Court Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Miner is not necessarily the best translator, but he is one of the essential scholars in this field for Western audiences. A really well put together book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    I was given this book in the late 70's by a friend who knew I was fascinated with Japan, long before I went to visit that country that I still resonate with in many ways. Maybe I wouldn't have gone if it weren't for this book, actually..? Feelings, sacred we have feelings.. This book is about feeling, and I can do no more to review it than to quote a few passages. "This news I hear, That you my friend, are plunged in grief, comes from afar, But still I must raise my voice in weeping; Your distant I was given this book in the late 70's by a friend who knew I was fascinated with Japan, long before I went to visit that country that I still resonate with in many ways. Maybe I wouldn't have gone if it weren't for this book, actually..? Feelings, sacred we have feelings.. This book is about feeling, and I can do no more to review it than to quote a few passages. "This news I hear, That you my friend, are plunged in grief, comes from afar, But still I must raise my voice in weeping; Your distant sorrow weighs upon my heart. (Toto ni mo Kimi ga nagaku to Kititsureba Ne nomi shi nakayu Aimou ware wa) You know, as I, the nature of this illusory world, How nothing stays----- Endeavor to be brave and stalwart, Do not wear out that heart in grief". Hitomaro, My favorite poet of this age, around 680-700) wrote this heart rendering poem that I will include verses of only. "It was by the sea of Iwami Where the clinging ivy creeps across the rocks By the waters off Cape Kara..... My young wife dwells there., Who like the seaweed bent to the current of love, The girl who slept beside me Soft and lithesome as the gem like water plants. Now those nights seem few when we held each other close in sleep. We parted unwillingly, Clinging to each other like ivy creepers; My heart ached and swelled Against the ribs that would hold it....................................... ........... Yakami where, they say, men retire with their wives-- I took my lonely way............................................ Though I always thought Myself a man with a warrior's heart, I found that my sleeves--- wide as they were, like our bedclothes-- Were all soaked through with tears". I will never finish this book......

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tonileg

    I love certain types of poetry, especially nature and human emotions so of course I wanted to know more about Japanese court poetry. I already have this fantasy of the Taira period of Japanese culture and I've read and re-read 'Tale of Genji' too many times so when I stumbled upon this book, I had to read more about this period form a historical view. poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350 is regarded as one of the great literatures of the world. This volume intro I love certain types of poetry, especially nature and human emotions so of course I wanted to know more about Japanese court poetry. I already have this fantasy of the Taira period of Japanese culture and I've read and re-read 'Tale of Genji' too many times so when I stumbled upon this book, I had to read more about this period form a historical view. poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350 is regarded as one of the great literatures of the world. This volume introduces readers to that literature, offering at once a condensation, a reorganization, and an extension (to A.D. 1500) of "Japanese Court Poetry" (1901). 198 pages and bought new at the university bookstore.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lise

    Beautiful poetry written by the Japanese imperial court between A.D. 550 and 1350.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gwern

    Moved to gwern.net. Moved to gwern.net.

  6. 5 out of 5

    William

    The beauty of waka in Heian times goes with studying buddhism.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cat Gurinsky

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl_at_Ubookquitous

  10. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  11. 5 out of 5

    William He

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cornelio

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ron Kastner

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  15. 5 out of 5

    E.R.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Danlin Zhang

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brais Lamela gómez

  18. 5 out of 5

    D

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michele Malloy

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

  22. 4 out of 5

    Enheduanna

  23. 5 out of 5

    Innerpattern

  24. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Franceseattle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Naomi Williams

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christina Marie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Norman

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.