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John Carter of Mars ( Books 1 - 7 ) ( Science fiction ) [with Active Table of Contents] [Illustrated] [Free Audio Links]

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John Carter of Mars Book 1 : A Princess of Mars Book 2 : The Gods of Mars Book 3 : The Warlord of Mars Book 4 : Thuvia, Maid of Mars Book 5 : The Chessmen of Mars Book 6 : The Master Mind of Mars Book 7 : A Fighting Man of Mars ****************************** Book 1 A Princess of Mars (1917) is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first of his Barsoom series. Ful John Carter of Mars Book 1 : A Princess of Mars Book 2 : The Gods of Mars Book 3 : The Warlord of Mars Book 4 : Thuvia, Maid of Mars Book 5 : The Chessmen of Mars Book 6 : The Master Mind of Mars Book 7 : A Fighting Man of Mars ****************************** Book 1 A Princess of Mars (1917) is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first of his Barsoom series. Full of swordplay and daring feats, the novel is considered a classic example of 20th century pulp fiction. It is also a seminal instance of the planetary romance, a sub-genre of science fantasy that became highly popular in the decades following its publication. Its early chapters also contain elements of the Western. The story is set on Mars, imagined as a dying planet with a harsh desert environment. This vision of Mars was based on the work of the astronomer Percival Lowell, whose ideas were widely popularized in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Barsoom series inspired a number of well-known 20th century science fiction writers, including Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein, and John Norman, and was also inspirational for many scientists in the fields of space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life, including Carl Sagan, who read A Princess of Mars when he was a child. Book 2 The Gods of Mars is a 1918 Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the second of his famous Barsoom series. It was first published in All-Story as a five-part serial in the issues for January-May 1913. It was later published as a complete novel by A. C. McClurg in September, 1918. Throughout his novels, Burroughs uses the classic device of a fictional Foreword or Preface that suggests that the contents of the following story reflect true events. Book 3 The Warlord of Mars is a science fiction novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the third of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs began writing it in June, 1913, going through five working titles; Yellow Men of Barsoom, The Fighting Prince of Mars, Across Savage Mars, The Prince of Helium, and The War Lord of Mars. Book 4 Thuvia, Maid of Mars is a science fiction novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the fourth of the Barsoom series. The principal characters are the Son of John Carter of Mars, Carthoris, and Thuvia of Ptarth, each of whom appeared in the previous two novels. While typical in many ways of Burrough's Barsoom novels, it also includes some inventive elements. Book 5 The Chessmen of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the fifth of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs began writing it in January, 1921, and the finished story was first published in Argosy All-Story Weekly as a six-part serial in the issues for February 18 and 25 and March 4, 11, 18 and 25, 1922. It was later published as a complete novel by A. C. McClurg in November 1922. Book 6 The Master Mind of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the sixth of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs' working titles for the novel were A Weird Adventure on Mars and Vad Varo of Barsoom. It was first published in the magazine Amazing Stories Annual vol. 1, July 15, 1927. The first book edition was published by A. C. McClurg in March, 1928. Book 7 A Fighting Man of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the seventh of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs began writing it on February 28, 1929, and the finished story was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a six-part serial in the issues for April to September, 1930. It was later published as a complete novel by Metropolitan in May, 1931.


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John Carter of Mars Book 1 : A Princess of Mars Book 2 : The Gods of Mars Book 3 : The Warlord of Mars Book 4 : Thuvia, Maid of Mars Book 5 : The Chessmen of Mars Book 6 : The Master Mind of Mars Book 7 : A Fighting Man of Mars ****************************** Book 1 A Princess of Mars (1917) is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first of his Barsoom series. Ful John Carter of Mars Book 1 : A Princess of Mars Book 2 : The Gods of Mars Book 3 : The Warlord of Mars Book 4 : Thuvia, Maid of Mars Book 5 : The Chessmen of Mars Book 6 : The Master Mind of Mars Book 7 : A Fighting Man of Mars ****************************** Book 1 A Princess of Mars (1917) is a science fantasy novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the first of his Barsoom series. Full of swordplay and daring feats, the novel is considered a classic example of 20th century pulp fiction. It is also a seminal instance of the planetary romance, a sub-genre of science fantasy that became highly popular in the decades following its publication. Its early chapters also contain elements of the Western. The story is set on Mars, imagined as a dying planet with a harsh desert environment. This vision of Mars was based on the work of the astronomer Percival Lowell, whose ideas were widely popularized in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Barsoom series inspired a number of well-known 20th century science fiction writers, including Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, Robert A. Heinlein, and John Norman, and was also inspirational for many scientists in the fields of space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life, including Carl Sagan, who read A Princess of Mars when he was a child. Book 2 The Gods of Mars is a 1918 Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the second of his famous Barsoom series. It was first published in All-Story as a five-part serial in the issues for January-May 1913. It was later published as a complete novel by A. C. McClurg in September, 1918. Throughout his novels, Burroughs uses the classic device of a fictional Foreword or Preface that suggests that the contents of the following story reflect true events. Book 3 The Warlord of Mars is a science fiction novel written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the third of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs began writing it in June, 1913, going through five working titles; Yellow Men of Barsoom, The Fighting Prince of Mars, Across Savage Mars, The Prince of Helium, and The War Lord of Mars. Book 4 Thuvia, Maid of Mars is a science fiction novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the fourth of the Barsoom series. The principal characters are the Son of John Carter of Mars, Carthoris, and Thuvia of Ptarth, each of whom appeared in the previous two novels. While typical in many ways of Burrough's Barsoom novels, it also includes some inventive elements. Book 5 The Chessmen of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the fifth of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs began writing it in January, 1921, and the finished story was first published in Argosy All-Story Weekly as a six-part serial in the issues for February 18 and 25 and March 4, 11, 18 and 25, 1922. It was later published as a complete novel by A. C. McClurg in November 1922. Book 6 The Master Mind of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the sixth of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs' working titles for the novel were A Weird Adventure on Mars and Vad Varo of Barsoom. It was first published in the magazine Amazing Stories Annual vol. 1, July 15, 1927. The first book edition was published by A. C. McClurg in March, 1928. Book 7 A Fighting Man of Mars is an Edgar Rice Burroughs science fiction novel, the seventh of his famous Barsoom series. Burroughs began writing it on February 28, 1929, and the finished story was first published in Blue Book Magazine as a six-part serial in the issues for April to September, 1930. It was later published as a complete novel by Metropolitan in May, 1931.

30 review for John Carter of Mars ( Books 1 - 7 ) ( Science fiction ) [with Active Table of Contents] [Illustrated] [Free Audio Links]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave Andrews

    I don't remember if I read all 7 novels in this book collection, but I know I've at least read several. Fun series. Some of it's a bit tough to relate to since it was written 100 years ago. Well, 97 years ago as of my writing this. Still, very creative and enjoyable read. One of the coolest parts is that while reading John Carter's talk of his experiences in American of the late 1800's, I realize that the author himself is drawing on his own personal experiences, having been born in the 1870's. Wi I don't remember if I read all 7 novels in this book collection, but I know I've at least read several. Fun series. Some of it's a bit tough to relate to since it was written 100 years ago. Well, 97 years ago as of my writing this. Still, very creative and enjoyable read. One of the coolest parts is that while reading John Carter's talk of his experiences in American of the late 1800's, I realize that the author himself is drawing on his own personal experiences, having been born in the 1870's. With the first book having been published in 1917, this is very early science fiction and very little SciFi had been written to that point (mostly Verne's works). Very creative for such an early effort and important work that has inspired hundreds of authors and filmmakers since.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Taylor

    Stories are fun but get a little redundant, princess in danger...save princess...think princess is safe only to lose princess while fighting off attackers...princess in danger...save princess - repeat this cycle a few times and you get the picture of life on Barsoom

  3. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Burroughs would seem to be a misogynist and a racist, his science is awful (though I got the impression that that's more because he doesn't want the science to interfere with a good story—every now and then he seems downright prophetic) and he's predictable too. And yet, I find these hugely entertaining!  You have to read it with all critical faculties turned off (egg-laying women? with breasts? An atmosphere that will disappear in days if the 'atmosphere plant' is turned off—and mysterious sabot Burroughs would seem to be a misogynist and a racist, his science is awful (though I got the impression that that's more because he doesn't want the science to interfere with a good story—every now and then he seems downright prophetic) and he's predictable too. And yet, I find these hugely entertaining!  You have to read it with all critical faculties turned off (egg-laying women? with breasts? An atmosphere that will disappear in days if the 'atmosphere plant' is turned off—and mysterious saboteurs who exist for no reason except to turn it off: we never find out why!) but if you can ignore all that, it's a fun romp.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fiannawolf

    A classic. I can see how this influenced star wars and other movies I loved. Even other books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Wright

    The end of the stories is very predictable, boy gets girl. However, the adventures before the end are wild and imaginative, all with a distinctively "martian" flair. An enjoyable read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristin.

    A long, long tale of John Carter's adventures on Mars Edgar R Burroughs had spun a lengthy and imaginative yarn about an earth man from the cavalry, John Carter of Virginia, who suddenly finds himself transported to Barsoom- Mars in earth's vernacular; his honor and decency along with his especial talent of launching himself great heights as well as distances with ease because of the decreased gravitational pull on Mars clearly becomes the first major difference in earth creature as opposed to Ma A long, long tale of John Carter's adventures on Mars Edgar R Burroughs had spun a lengthy and imaginative yarn about an earth man from the cavalry, John Carter of Virginia, who suddenly finds himself transported to Barsoom- Mars in earth's vernacular; his honor and decency along with his especial talent of launching himself great heights as well as distances with ease because of the decreased gravitational pull on Mars clearly becomes the first major difference in earth creature as opposed to Martian being.. This particular ability, as well as his innate senses of honor and chivalry, find.him quickly embroiled in Martian politics. In one of his earlier adventures, John becomes embroiled in a feud between Martian tribesmen when he meets Dejah Toris, a martian Princess, whom he later marries and has a son. But tragically he.finds himself transported back to a cave.on Earth. His martian life continued without John Carter, whose earthly stay lssted an inconvenient ten earth years. Upon his eventual return, Carter becomes embroiled in a great conflict in the politics of another part of Mars, only to find that his kingdom had been embroiled in a takeover by a less friendly group and his wife stolen away. The rest of the books work JC through various wars and alliances as he tries to restore him self, his wife, and the son he discovers in one of those many battles. Each book of his adventures brings him new encounters of good and bad people, strange policies, and the opportunity to bring enlightenment to the peoples of Barsoom- Mars. The style.of the writing may take a bit of time in order to develop appreciation for the contemporary readers as well as becoming comfortable with its rhythm. Burroughs developed a creative method of naming characters, places, peoples of Mars , as well as picturesque style in describing the creatures, habits, and customs of those native to the planet we call Mars. The 7Novels included in John Carter: Barsoom Series, each bring more of the subcultures, climates, hatreds, descriptive creatures, political unrest, and friendships between the various subcultures on Barsoom. The series of novels shows imagination and the optimism that Burroughs' lead character displays as his basic characteristic of Earthly man. It is a set of novels that emphasizes difference in creature kind yet still exhibiting some common thread of good towards many if their fellow beings.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cookie

    #cookiereads John Carter (Barsoon 1-7) by Edgar Rice Burroughs 🌕 John Carter, a veteran of the Civil War, arrives in Arizona to look for gold. Hiding in a caves to avoid capture by the Apache, he ends up on the planet Mars!!! There the adventures begin!!! He meets the Martian who are essentially human. He falls in love with Dejah Thoris. And he will do anything for her. 🌕 Furiends there are seven novels in this book (well over a 1000 pages); the first three book focuses on John Carter. The fourth #cookiereads John Carter (Barsoon 1-7) by Edgar Rice Burroughs 🌕 John Carter, a veteran of the Civil War, arrives in Arizona to look for gold. Hiding in a caves to avoid capture by the Apache, he ends up on the planet Mars!!! There the adventures begin!!! He meets the Martian who are essentially human. He falls in love with Dejah Thoris. And he will do anything for her. 🌕 Furiends there are seven novels in this book (well over a 1000 pages); the first three book focuses on John Carter. The fourth book on his son Carthoris. The five on his daughter Tara. The sixth and seventh books focus on some characters. While all of these characters go some crazy adventures (heads that attach to bodies, cannibals, transference, and much more) the basic theme is the same....the main characters go through all these adventures to rescue their love interest! It does kinda get boring. But there is a lot of adventures to get there! Plus there is an invisibility cloak!!! Furiends this was written over a 100 years ago!!! (Wonder if #jkrowling got the idea from this author?) 🌕 2.5 paws out of four paws!! #sciencefictionclassics #edgarriceburroughs #johncarterofmars #barsoomseries #carthorisandthuvia #dejahthoris #ulyssespaxton #readingtheclassics📚 #bookstagrammer #dogsreadingbooks #corgisofinstagram #corgilife #corgireads #bluemerlecorgi

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Probably many were led to this series via Burroughs Tarzan novels, but although I've read some of those, I came to these by another route. That being Robert A. Heinlein's in-print admiration for these, a favorite of his childhood reading, which was contemporaneous with their publication. I was surprised by the quality of the writing here, as many of the pulp sci-fi stories of the 20's and 30's lack the sophistication of these, which was not to start to reappear until the 1940's in this genre. As Probably many were led to this series via Burroughs Tarzan novels, but although I've read some of those, I came to these by another route. That being Robert A. Heinlein's in-print admiration for these, a favorite of his childhood reading, which was contemporaneous with their publication. I was surprised by the quality of the writing here, as many of the pulp sci-fi stories of the 20's and 30's lack the sophistication of these, which was not to start to reappear until the 1940's in this genre. As it is, these are well-thought-out tales, at the core romances with much action surrounding them, so as to not alienate the male audience Burroughs sought for his stories. As you progress through them, you begin to see that the author had a less than fervent regard for religion, evidenced by his treatment of it in these tales. The science is quite amusing, going beyond what was capable on earth at the time. Good fun, and an excellent intro to early sci-fi for dedicated fans of the genre.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ellison Darling

    I tagged this as "quit mid-book," but since this particular version is seven books, it's worth noting that I read 4/7 books before stopping. It's interesting to read the classics that inspired so many other writers, but by the end of the forth book I was heartily tired of delicate damsels in distress being rescued by strapping he-men thrusting joyously into battle. I understand the significance of the John Carter of Mars books, but there are so many more fascinating authors with diverse viewpoin I tagged this as "quit mid-book," but since this particular version is seven books, it's worth noting that I read 4/7 books before stopping. It's interesting to read the classics that inspired so many other writers, but by the end of the forth book I was heartily tired of delicate damsels in distress being rescued by strapping he-men thrusting joyously into battle. I understand the significance of the John Carter of Mars books, but there are so many more fascinating authors with diverse viewpoints today that I don't feel it's necessary to keep flogging away at this series just because it has historical importance to the genre.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    A collection of the first seven books of the Barsoom series. Listed below is the timeframe and my rating of each book. 1) 1 star. John Carter finds the cave on Earth that takes him to Mars, is captured by the Tharns, meets Dejah Thoris, and helps her fight the city of Zodanga. 2) 1 star. John returns to Mars finding himself on the banks of the Lost Sea of Korus in the Valley of Dor. I didn’t read the rest of the books. I lost interested when it got to gruesome and too oddly complicated.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    What a great collection from 100 years ago. Burroughs virtues were his story telling ability, his world building, and his talent for giving the reader a good time. His books can be inspiring to the read, they can be surprising my philosophical in places, and they can be so formulaic as to be boring. Burroughs is guilty of the chauvinisms of his time. Which is a flaw in his work. Overall, he contributed to science fiction literature on its infancy an is still worth reading. The Barsoom stories is What a great collection from 100 years ago. Burroughs virtues were his story telling ability, his world building, and his talent for giving the reader a good time. His books can be inspiring to the read, they can be surprising my philosophical in places, and they can be so formulaic as to be boring. Burroughs is guilty of the chauvinisms of his time. Which is a flaw in his work. Overall, he contributed to science fiction literature on its infancy an is still worth reading. The Barsoom stories is a good place to start.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    It has been a long time since I last read these books. I could not recall them till I was in the midst of them. On this reading I thoroughly enjoyed all of them. My interest in reading them was sparked from recently watching the movie. While I did enjoy the movie they did no justice to the actual books. I have been a fan of Edgar Rice Burroughs for a very long time and was glad to have the chance to read these again. I find them to be very entertaining and good for all ages.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert2481

    I only read the first one, because that was enough. I read it & most of the others when I was a teenager, which is probably the best time. Though, I do wonder how well this prose would hold up these days. And, the plot doesn't hold up to close scrutiny, or even cursory, but it does have it's charms; in a certain antiquarian way I only read the first one, because that was enough. I read it & most of the others when I was a teenager, which is probably the best time. Though, I do wonder how well this prose would hold up these days. And, the plot doesn't hold up to close scrutiny, or even cursory, but it does have it's charms; in a certain antiquarian way

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Wolverton

    Dated but imaginative Burroughs was very imaginative and certainly knew how to write romantic adventures. The story needs to be read as a fantasy as time takes away actual belief of our world.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul Potts

    Last time I read these was 35 years ago. I have often thought about these heroic stories (11 in all), so I revisited the first seven. They didn't have quite the same impact, but they are great adventure stories. Burroughs had a great imagination.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lavender

    This compilation includes the first 6 Barsoom novels as well as a short story. Fun sci fi stories with an epic hero. I will have to dig around for the rest of the novels in this series to see where it goes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Greg Perczak

    The Mars Series I have reread the first 7 novels of Burrough’s Mars series for the first time in many years, and find that these stories from the past are even more entertaining, exciting, and admirable than they seemed when I was a boy. Do yourself a favor and buy this set!

  18. 5 out of 5

    DEF

    A true classic series of science fiction on par with HG Wells and Jules Verne. An epic series of seven stories that takes you through generations of heros and the villains they defeat. A must read for every true sci-fi fan.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelvin Davies

    Review I wanted to read this book/books after seeing the film John Carter . I found this to be a collection of books. Overall I enjoyed it. Towards the end,however, it dragged on a bit.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Timothy L Espinoza

    Great classic read! Just a great read in a style that is unique and classic.. I can't help longing for Barsoom, a good sword and a trusty calot!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lance Mortenson

    Spell bound Nothing like the movie, so much more. Reads like an action book from start to finish. Would love for a true director to make a better movie of John Carter.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mathew Suhoversnik

    Awesome Great fantasy, the language and vocabulary are a breath of freshness. I was led to this story first because of the movie glad to have come across a whole series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynne Davis

    Brilliant series!! This series is quite fantastic to say the very least. I just wish there were more to read. Loved them all

  24. 5 out of 5

    Glenn

    Re-reading the series for the first time since I was about 12 years old. How much I'd forgotten! Kindle edition was on sale.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dusty Bailey

    Overused the phrase to the extreme way too much.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Omar Abdel-razzak

    Old fashioned fun Too many cliffhangers and coincidences. Just don't let it bother you and have fun reading. Pulp serials at their best!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Read 1-3. A classic, but not a great read

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tristan

    “A Princess of Mars” is a classic and seminal planetary romance, closer to the works of Jules Verne than to the golden age of sci-fi novels. There’s very little concern with science here, other than a prescient description of hydroponics and automated restaurants. Admittedly, nothing much was known about Mars at the time of writing, so this is not remarkable, but an awareness of Mars’ weaker gravity is central to the plot. This novel is a quaintly racist, misogynistic, and highly entitled boy’s o “A Princess of Mars” is a classic and seminal planetary romance, closer to the works of Jules Verne than to the golden age of sci-fi novels. There’s very little concern with science here, other than a prescient description of hydroponics and automated restaurants. Admittedly, nothing much was known about Mars at the time of writing, so this is not remarkable, but an awareness of Mars’ weaker gravity is central to the plot. This novel is a quaintly racist, misogynistic, and highly entitled boy’s own yarn with a decidedly superior and manly gentleman protagonist. The first person narration is far removed from modern tastes: one can easily imagine an eloquent explorer expounding upon his discoveries in uncharted continents, delivered as a formal after dinner speech in front of a black-tie gentleman’s club audience. The conceit of a discovered memoir in manuscript works well here, as it allows retrospective comment on the protagonist’s thoughts and emotions whilst the action unfolds, and the introduction of detailed and didactic world knowledge acquired later and provided in hindsight, without forming a jarring infodump. This works better in my view than modern first person narration which is meant to convey the action immediately, but brings in details the narrator cannot possibly know or be concerned with at the time. Although written over a century ago (first serialised in 1912), the visual imagination on display in this novel is formidable even today, and it remains an entertaining read despite its evident age and very, very simplistic plot. Three stars for this one. “Gods of Mars” The second episode of the Barsoom series is a true sword and planet bloodfest, starting with a frenzied series of sword fights against monsters and bad guys and carrying on in the same vein to the breathless cliffhanger at the end. The opening chapters also provide an interesting subversion of the concept of heaven, peddled by a priesthood that devours the bodies of believers seeking their reward in the promised land. But the priesthood’s fanatical beliefs are also subverted in their turn. The true nature of the religion of Barsoom uncovered by John Carter is a startlingly corrupt horror. There’s an ironic joy in the puncturing of Barsoomian hubris, mirroring that of contemporary America (this episode was serialised in 1913 and first published as a novel in 1918), whether that hubris is expressed in religious or racial exceptionalism. This novel’s central theme is a condemnation of religious power and intolerance that divides the races with irrational hatred. Quite forward thinking. The second half is all war and prowess, but the unfolding of events (not quite a plot) had been well foreshadowed throughout, so that the conclusion remains edge-of-the-seat to the very last paragraphs. This is quite a thrilling read, skilfully choreographed and masterfully delivered. The descriptive imagination on display here remains formidable. This is all spectacle and violence, no brains involved. Besides that, the narration is the same smug, entitled self-aggrandisement as before, in the form of a first person memoir. John Carter’s superiority sails over obstacles, slaughters foes, and causes all females to swoon - which is actually a dramatic plot point at least. The protagonist is truly a hero of a long departed age of caricatural manliness. Fun to read when considered in context. Three stars again. “Warlords of Mars” “Thuvia, Maid of Mars” “The Chessmen of Mars” “The Master Mind of Mars” “A Fighting Man of Mars” There are four Barsoom books not included in this collection, which I will have to find: “Swords Of Mars”, “Synthetic Men Of Mars”, “Llana Of Gathol”, and “John Carter Of Mars”.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stanley Townsend

    (Re)read the first four. Read them in junior high.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Hapney

    Growing up, when I thought of Edgar Rice Burroughs I always thought of Tarzan books. Since these novels first appeared around 100 years ago I just hadn't ever read them, but after seeing the John Carter movie and knowing that the books are generally better than the movies that are made from them I thought it would be fun to see what the original story was. As I expected there were quite a few differences between the film version and the novels which were definitely the better story. I had to giv Growing up, when I thought of Edgar Rice Burroughs I always thought of Tarzan books. Since these novels first appeared around 100 years ago I just hadn't ever read them, but after seeing the John Carter movie and knowing that the books are generally better than the movies that are made from them I thought it would be fun to see what the original story was. As I expected there were quite a few differences between the film version and the novels which were definitely the better story. I had to give this group of novels five stars as I didn't pause at all in the reading of all seven of them and greatly enjoyed the adventure as a whole for the 99 cents I spent to buy it (what a bargain). From reading these I'm also led to believe that Mr. Burroughs didn't know what a defeatist attitude was as even in the most dire of circumstances his characters always seem to push aside the hardships and impossibility of their situations with an upbeat attitude and light heart because as the mantra for Mr. Burroughs' books goes, "I still live." The first books are about John Carter's experiences. Later books move on to cover his children and finally others from Mars and another human transplant to the red planet. It was a really fun read and it was interesting to see things that were only science fiction then, but that we use every day now such as 'wireless telephony'. I know I generally try to read and share more recent material by independent authors, but it was a great story and I thoroughly enjoyed the adventure as a whole. It's a series about striving forward, honor, loyalty and the will to go on which I think is timeless. I admit that I enjoyed some of the novels a little more than others, but as I read it on my e-reader it was really just like one really long, sweeping adventure. So if you have some spare time and want to step back 100 years to some really great early science fiction, I think I can confidently say that any true science fiction buff would enjoy the trip. It's not like there aren't plenty of good reviews about these books over the last century to make you feel confident as you step out on Mr. Burroughs' path to Mars, but if you haven't read them or thought about it you might want to reconsider. Review originally posted at: http://tjsbookblog.blogspot.com/

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