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Summit

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A summit is a summit, and the truth is the truth. But the view from 8,848 meters isn't always so clear. Two men, seventy years apart, push for the top of Mount Everest, driven by forces beyond their control and something inside that says climb. After eight successful summits, Mount Everest guide Neil Quinn is confident he can handle anything the mountain throws his way. Bu A summit is a summit, and the truth is the truth. But the view from 8,848 meters isn't always so clear. Two men, seventy years apart, push for the top of Mount Everest, driven by forces beyond their control and something inside that says climb. After eight successful summits, Mount Everest guide Neil Quinn is confident he can handle anything the mountain throws his way. But then disaster strikes steps from the top, leaving him with a lot of questions and a very old swastika-embellished ice axe that should never have been so high on the mountain - not if Everest's meticulously documented history is accurate. But before Quinn can even catch his breath, the combined wrath of his vengeful employer and an angry client drives him out of the Himalayas and back to Europe, where the newly blackballed English guide struggles to make ends meet and discover the truth of what happened that fateful day. He soon uncovers the story of Josef Becker, a Nazi climber who sought the top of the world seventy years before, when Europe teetered on the brink of the Second World War. Quinn's innocent queries into Becker's expedition soon have neo-Nazis, assassins, and history buffs vying to take possession of the axe - proof of Nazi alpine superiority, and strong evidence that a German climber was the first to summit Mount Everest. Beautifully written and meticulously researched, Summit follows two climbers across two continents as their stories and movements intertwine across history, culminating in one final push for the top of the world.


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A summit is a summit, and the truth is the truth. But the view from 8,848 meters isn't always so clear. Two men, seventy years apart, push for the top of Mount Everest, driven by forces beyond their control and something inside that says climb. After eight successful summits, Mount Everest guide Neil Quinn is confident he can handle anything the mountain throws his way. Bu A summit is a summit, and the truth is the truth. But the view from 8,848 meters isn't always so clear. Two men, seventy years apart, push for the top of Mount Everest, driven by forces beyond their control and something inside that says climb. After eight successful summits, Mount Everest guide Neil Quinn is confident he can handle anything the mountain throws his way. But then disaster strikes steps from the top, leaving him with a lot of questions and a very old swastika-embellished ice axe that should never have been so high on the mountain - not if Everest's meticulously documented history is accurate. But before Quinn can even catch his breath, the combined wrath of his vengeful employer and an angry client drives him out of the Himalayas and back to Europe, where the newly blackballed English guide struggles to make ends meet and discover the truth of what happened that fateful day. He soon uncovers the story of Josef Becker, a Nazi climber who sought the top of the world seventy years before, when Europe teetered on the brink of the Second World War. Quinn's innocent queries into Becker's expedition soon have neo-Nazis, assassins, and history buffs vying to take possession of the axe - proof of Nazi alpine superiority, and strong evidence that a German climber was the first to summit Mount Everest. Beautifully written and meticulously researched, Summit follows two climbers across two continents as their stories and movements intertwine across history, culminating in one final push for the top of the world.

30 review for Summit

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    First of all, I wish to thank NetGalley, Blackstone Publishing, and Mr. Harry Farthing for providing me with an ARC of the debut novel, Summit, which I received in exchange for my unbiased review. I don’t know if Farthing is his real name, but what a fabulous moniker for a British-born writer! Mr. Farthing has extensive experience bonding with earth’s highest mountains, which lends incredible authenticity to this fictional adventure thriller. I recall reading Maurice Herzog’s Annapurna at least First of all, I wish to thank NetGalley, Blackstone Publishing, and Mr. Harry Farthing for providing me with an ARC of the debut novel, Summit, which I received in exchange for my unbiased review. I don’t know if Farthing is his real name, but what a fabulous moniker for a British-born writer! Mr. Farthing has extensive experience bonding with earth’s highest mountains, which lends incredible authenticity to this fictional adventure thriller. I recall reading Maurice Herzog’s Annapurna at least forty years ago and feeling captivated by the story of men battling the elements while challenging themselves to scale the world’s tenth highest mountain. That is non-fiction. In Summit, Farthing draws upon his love of travel and of mountaineering to execute a well-drawn story of international intrigue. Actually, it involves two sagas, seven decades apart. What ties them together is the Himalayan giant the Tibetans consider to be the “Goddess Mother of the World,” Chomolungma, known to westerners as Mount Everest. The book opens with British mountain guide Neil Quinn leading a trek, which involves the sixteen-year-old son of a wealthy American. The descent has disastrous results for the team, but in the process, Quinn makes a discovery that pushes him to probe further into Everest’s exploration history. That history, we see in the parallel story of a German soldier, Gefreiter Josef Becker. Becker, along with his buddies, Gunter and Kurt, is involved in smuggling Jews through the mountains into Switzerland and returning with assorted contraband. Each story line held some interest for me, but what did a 2009 expedition and a 1938 Nazi soldier have to do with one another? For those who are looking for a fast-paced thriller, I suggest you look elsewhere. No, reading this book is like – well, I suppose it’s like climbing a very steep incline. One does it slowly, at a careful, deliberate pace. Farthing alternates chapters between Quinn and Becker, patiently taking the reader one step at a time toward the moment when the mystery unfolds and the link between the past and the present becomes evident. That is when my interest really piqued! Quinn. Becker. Ang Noru Sherpa, Henrietta Richards, Sarron, Graf…All of these characters came to life for me. Quinn and Becker. Two men from different generations and cultures. It seemed to me that each man has, despite his shortcomings and flaws, a dignity and strength of character that help him endure all of the mental, physical, and moral challenges that are thrown at him throughout the course of his quest. Along the way, there are those who go out of their way to assist, like Henrietta, Graf, the Tibetan monks, and Ang Noru. As always, when there is a hero, there is an adversary. For Becker, it is his superior officers and the British officer Macfarlane. The biggest presence in the book is the mountain herself. She is climbed because she is there. Some seek to conquer her. Some desire only to become one with her. Some ascend and never come down. Farthing shows us how she brings out the best and the worst in humankind. For the billionaire who sent his teenage son up to the summit to gain more fame for the family name, or the Nazi commanders who sought glory for the Third Reich, would there be triumph? Or do men like Neil Quinn and Josef Becker, who climb because the mountain calls to them, seek to understand the soul of the mountain? As the Sherpas chant, “Om mani padme hum,” which is a Buddhist mantra or meditation seeking blessings and compassion. Becker and Quinn have other motives, certainly. The suspense builds as Quinn, with the help of Henrietta Richards, tries to find answers to his mystery. What about Josef Becker? Does he reach the summit of Everest? I honestly wasn’t sure until the very end. Well done, Mr. Farthing. If I have anything critical to add, it would be that I spent a lot of time looking up terminology and foreign words. This is something I often do as I read, but I found myself doing it frequently as I read Summit. Perhaps a few descriptions or definitions along the way would be helpful, if it wouldn’t slow down the pace. I did learn a lot about Everest, and I even looked to see if there was any evidence of Nazi attempts at Everest in the late 30s, as the writing was so convincing. For those who appreciate adventure, history, and mystery, I recommend Summit. 4 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Garg Ankit

    "Summit" by Harry Farthing is a descriptive tale about Chomulungma, better known as the Mount Everest. It is a highly-informative and authentic fictional narrative unfolding across two timelines almost 70 years apart. Be it a Jew-loving Nazi-hating German, or another Nazi attempting the Fourth Reich, or superstitious Tibetan lord, or a diplomat turned mountain expert, or legendary Sherpas, or Russian mafia, or involvement of international secret agencies, the story has it all. The book has several "Summit" by Harry Farthing is a descriptive tale about Chomulungma, better known as the Mount Everest. It is a highly-informative and authentic fictional narrative unfolding across two timelines almost 70 years apart. Be it a Jew-loving Nazi-hating German, or another Nazi attempting the Fourth Reich, or superstitious Tibetan lord, or a diplomat turned mountain expert, or legendary Sherpas, or Russian mafia, or involvement of international secret agencies, the story has it all. The book has several worthy reading recommendations regarding the Mount Everest and mountain climbing in general. The message of love over hate is quite welcoming. There is also the bit about loyalty and honor: "No man has the right to deny the destiny of another, whatever his masters might command. True honor is much more than blind loyalty." The fact that it is the debut work of the author is like icing on the cake. Verdict: Recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Surabhi Sharma

    ‘Because it’s there’ – George Leigh Mallory ‘SUMMIT’ is a fictional story that has fact in the foundations of its two imaginary journeys. The obvious fact is that Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world standing tall and high at the height of 29,029 feet or 8,848 meters. This book is originally published by Blackstone Publishing (UK) and published in India by Westland Books. This is Westland’s Books first international release and after reading, I have no doubt why the publisher chooses ‘Because it’s there’ – George Leigh Mallory ‘SUMMIT’ is a fictional story that has fact in the foundations of its two imaginary journeys. The obvious fact is that Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world standing tall and high at the height of 29,029 feet or 8,848 meters. This book is originally published by Blackstone Publishing (UK) and published in India by Westland Books. This is Westland’s Books first international release and after reading, I have no doubt why the publisher chooses this book. The two stories run parallel in the book; one is of 1938 of Joseph Becker who is a Nazi soldier in German military and other is of 2009 of Neil Quinn, a seasoned mountain guide in charge of the 16 year old son of a Long Island Billionaire. The story of the book is refreshing. A masterpiece which you cannot afford to miss. For all the avid readers who want to read something good, this is the book for you. I recommend this book to all the readers not just those who are fascinated by the mountains (like me) or adventure or thriller reader but the reader who always ready to take a dive in the ocean of words. Don’t miss it, I am saying it again. This book is madness. As a reader it is my one of the priceless possessions. The book like this is written in once in every thousand book. Don’t just go with the name of the book, it is not about the tracking, the difficulties they face to reach on the top of the world or something. This is something you have never read before. The book is a complex thriller which does not let you move out of your place. A compelling page turner. Magnificent! Enthralling! Spellbinding! Fast paced novel. 'I received a copy from the publisher (Westland Books) in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.' https://thereviewauthor.wordpress.com/

  4. 5 out of 5

    Empress Reece (Hooked on Books)

    First to Summit Mt. Everest... If you have any interest in mountain climbing and/or the Third Reich then this book is a must read. Farthing weaves a fascinating tale about the Nazi's attempting to best the British at being the first to summit Mt. Everest. The story is told in two parallel, past and present, story lines which intersect in a dramatic conclusion. This story is so well-written and the characters and settings are so well-developed that you can literally imagine this happening. From wh First to Summit Mt. Everest... If you have any interest in mountain climbing and/or the Third Reich then this book is a must read. Farthing weaves a fascinating tale about the Nazi's attempting to best the British at being the first to summit Mt. Everest. The story is told in two parallel, past and present, story lines which intersect in a dramatic conclusion. This story is so well-written and the characters and settings are so well-developed that you can literally imagine this happening. From what I read Farthing has climbing experience and it really comes through in the book. I've always enjoyed reading about climbing expeditions to Everest but I never actually wanted to join one until I read this book! (even if I only reach Base Camp lol)  *I received this ARC from NetGalley & Blackstone Publishing in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This book needed an editor with a sharper pair of scissors. Following two story lines at the same time (one from 1939, the other from 2009) isn't all that difficult and was of course, intriguing. But there were too many twists and turns that didn't make sense, and more than a few dialogues with imaginary characters. Like the climbers nearing the top of Mt. Everest, I found my brain a little oxygen deprived and confused by the time this Summit was conquered. In the end, too many words spoiled a go This book needed an editor with a sharper pair of scissors. Following two story lines at the same time (one from 1939, the other from 2009) isn't all that difficult and was of course, intriguing. But there were too many twists and turns that didn't make sense, and more than a few dialogues with imaginary characters. Like the climbers nearing the top of Mt. Everest, I found my brain a little oxygen deprived and confused by the time this Summit was conquered. In the end, too many words spoiled a good story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cold War Conversations Podcast

    A brilliant debut. This gripped me from start to finish. Harry Farthing has put together an excellently researched debut novel set mainly on Everest in a dual timeline of 2010 and 1939. He combines a gripping mountain climbing story with a “what if” the Third Reich had summited before Hillary and Tenzing in 1952. I was initially sceptical that this was going to be a sensationalist thriller, but Farthing carries it off with style and genuine excitement. Farthing not only knows how to describe the i A brilliant debut. This gripped me from start to finish. Harry Farthing has put together an excellently researched debut novel set mainly on Everest in a dual timeline of 2010 and 1939. He combines a gripping mountain climbing story with a “what if” the Third Reich had summited before Hillary and Tenzing in 1952. I was initially sceptical that this was going to be a sensationalist thriller, but Farthing carries it off with style and genuine excitement. Farthing not only knows how to describe the intense conditions on the peak, but also knows the history of the attempts on the peak which add extra detail that makes the story even more credible. The story is told in two parallel, past and present, story lines which intersect in a dramatic conclusion. His descriptions really do take you to the edge, with credible characters you both love and hate. I heartily recommend this if you like a good thriller, combined with mountains and Nazis. What’s not to like?! I received this ARC from NetGalley & Blackstone Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rob Twinem

    An excellent piece of good old fashioned, intelligent, thought provoking storytelling surrounding the mystical Mount Everest. The author expertly blends two timelines; 1939 and Josef Becker has been blackmailed by the growing power of the Nazi party who want him to be the first person to scale Mount Everest and by doing so bring power and prestige to a fanatical national socialist party; 2009 Neil Quinn, hired by the ruthless Jean Philippe Sarron, is tasked with the mission of guiding Nelson Tat An excellent piece of good old fashioned, intelligent, thought provoking storytelling surrounding the mystical Mount Everest. The author expertly blends two timelines; 1939 and Josef Becker has been blackmailed by the growing power of the Nazi party who want him to be the first person to scale Mount Everest and by doing so bring power and prestige to a fanatical national socialist party; 2009 Neil Quinn, hired by the ruthless Jean Philippe Sarron, is tasked with the mission of guiding Nelson Tate Junior to the summit. Both events create a masterful and visual reading experience, the two stories run seamlessly side by side but with a connection running throughout and beautifully blended and concluded in the final chapters. The only slight criticism I have is in the length of the novel and, I felt it might have benefited from a slightly shorter page count.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Swystun

    To be frank this was a bit of climb. It runs about five hundred pages and employs an intertwined narrative of the past and present. At its core, the book is about personal challenge and redemption (of sorts). It could have been paired down a bit by eliminating some of the side stories. I appreciated the attempt at complexity but it distracted more than helped. Character development suffered due to the multiple twists and turns. The book really moves when the characters are on the mountain but la To be frank this was a bit of climb. It runs about five hundred pages and employs an intertwined narrative of the past and present. At its core, the book is about personal challenge and redemption (of sorts). It could have been paired down a bit by eliminating some of the side stories. I appreciated the attempt at complexity but it distracted more than helped. Character development suffered due to the multiple twists and turns. The book really moves when the characters are on the mountain but languishes otherwise. It is one of those books to have in the living room or in your laptop case when traveling. It will pass the time and you do not have to follow too closely. However, I advise having plenty of supplies on hand like scotch and umm, more scotch. The drink will warm you up when you are "climbing Everest".

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Thoroughly enjoyable read and very gripping from start to finish. The terminology was easy to understand being that I am a non-climber. The two stories are beautifully intertwined and share an equally compelling narrative which culminates to a dramatic conclusion that is not without its twists and turns. The characters are excellent and the author writes with such authority that I just couldn't put the book down. His vast knowledge of Everest was quite the education and I actually picked up a th Thoroughly enjoyable read and very gripping from start to finish. The terminology was easy to understand being that I am a non-climber. The two stories are beautifully intertwined and share an equally compelling narrative which culminates to a dramatic conclusion that is not without its twists and turns. The characters are excellent and the author writes with such authority that I just couldn't put the book down. His vast knowledge of Everest was quite the education and I actually picked up a thing or two about climbing. Highly recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Farthing

    Brilliant book. Well executed plot, great characters and an enthralling story also a great final unexpected twist. The fact that it is written by my son ought to be mentioned but this is a great book, just try it and see!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Freesiab

    This book wasn't at all what I expected. It's more of an adventure book of mystery and non stop action, which includes climbing. I loved it! It was a touch long but was still interesting. I want to do my own research on what parts were inspired by true events. The characters were all so real and it all seemed so believable, if not fantastic! I received an ARC of this book for an honest review. This book will be released in in the US June 6 2016 and I recommend it to all my adventure reading frie This book wasn't at all what I expected. It's more of an adventure book of mystery and non stop action, which includes climbing. I loved it! It was a touch long but was still interesting. I want to do my own research on what parts were inspired by true events. The characters were all so real and it all seemed so believable, if not fantastic! I received an ARC of this book for an honest review. This book will be released in in the US June 6 2016 and I recommend it to all my adventure reading friends!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michele Weiner

    Two stories intertwined about climbing Mount Everest then and now. Excellent in every way. Thrilling, engaging, surprising, touching. Loved it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I really debated between giving this one 3.5 or 4 stars. This is a novel of two different stories that slowly intertwine. The first focuses on a Mt. Everest summit expedition that goes wrong in 2009. The second is set in 1939 in Nazi Germany. It's an action-packed adventure mystery, which is exactly what I needed after reading several books that dragged. It's not a perfect story: there might be a few too many twists in this novel, and there is one character whose speech is laced with strong prof I really debated between giving this one 3.5 or 4 stars. This is a novel of two different stories that slowly intertwine. The first focuses on a Mt. Everest summit expedition that goes wrong in 2009. The second is set in 1939 in Nazi Germany. It's an action-packed adventure mystery, which is exactly what I needed after reading several books that dragged. It's not a perfect story: there might be a few too many twists in this novel, and there is one character whose speech is laced with strong profanity (so be warned), but overall this book captured and held my interest.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bharti

    If Mt. Everest interests you, has sparked even a tiny flicker of curiosity on what goes up on the mountains and the various teams of people who climb it. Summit is about 2 men on their journey up the mountain seventy years apart and how their paths cross and reveal the past. An excellent, engaging story. More on the Blog - http://wp.me/p6THg1-eT If Mt. Everest interests you, has sparked even a tiny flicker of curiosity on what goes up on the mountains and the various teams of people who climb it. Summit is about 2 men on their journey up the mountain seventy years apart and how their paths cross and reveal the past. An excellent, engaging story. More on the Blog - http://wp.me/p6THg1-eT

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gay

    This book made my COVID 19 self isolation enjoyable. I listened to the Audible version as I took my walks and puttered around my empty house. Thank you!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Putnam

    3.5. Solid, quite well written except for the occasional awkward moment. An over-the-top villain, which I found rather marring to the story, esp when compared to the weak hero, Quinn, who never does a thing for himself and is always bailed out by someone else. Also, I'm sorry, even though the author says none of the situations are impossible, I DO think that having several concussions, including what would have to be classified as a major TBI (coma, dude), and then after just a few months climbi 3.5. Solid, quite well written except for the occasional awkward moment. An over-the-top villain, which I found rather marring to the story, esp when compared to the weak hero, Quinn, who never does a thing for himself and is always bailed out by someone else. Also, I'm sorry, even though the author says none of the situations are impossible, I DO think that having several concussions, including what would have to be classified as a major TBI (coma, dude), and then after just a few months climbing Everest (impossible right there), losing your O2 while still in the death zone on the way down, suffering another concussion while still in that state, then having to fight three attackers (who seem awfully agile--I don't care if they do have oxygen--it's still hard to move at that altitude) for your life, losing consciousness again, then climbing BACK to the summit to descend by the other route, all without O2. Nope. But. It's a thriller, and you usually have to suspend disbelief for those, and it's nowhere near as bad as the movie K2... Though THAT was slapstick. My favorite of the Everest novels is Escape from Kathmandu by KSR, though that is another thing altogether and it's meant to be unbelievable... a very playful book. So overall I'd recommend Summit.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Farrah Follmann

    I loved this book. It has beautiful imagery, a great narrative, a lot of history and it's suspenseful. It ticked all my boxes! I loved this book. It has beautiful imagery, a great narrative, a lot of history and it's suspenseful. It ticked all my boxes!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This mystery/thriller has been out since 2014 and deals with two ascents to the top of Mount Everest, one in 1939 and another in 2009. In 2009 experienced guide and climber Neil Quinn is helping the 16-year-old son of a billionaire reach the top of the mountain. Nelson Tate, Jr. has already conquered the highest mountains on six continents and this climb will cement his record for all of them. They make it to the top but things go horribly wrong and the boy dies. On Quinn's descent he finds a hid This mystery/thriller has been out since 2014 and deals with two ascents to the top of Mount Everest, one in 1939 and another in 2009. In 2009 experienced guide and climber Neil Quinn is helping the 16-year-old son of a billionaire reach the top of the mountain. Nelson Tate, Jr. has already conquered the highest mountains on six continents and this climb will cement his record for all of them. They make it to the top but things go horribly wrong and the boy dies. On Quinn's descent he finds a hidden cove on the mountain's face and goes in for shelter. There he finds a climbing ax with initials and a swastika. The story then goes back to 1938 in the Austrian Alps. Josef Becker is part of a group of German mountaineer soldiers, but on "practice missions" he and some other soldiers do some smuggling back and forth across the Swiss border. On the way there they also help sneak Jews to safety. Josef and the others are caught. Nearly tortured and executed, Josef is given an alternative. Heinrich Himmler has decided it would be a great victory for the Reich to be the first country to conquer Everest. The problem is that the only way to do that is to sneak into countries currently under British control. The narrative swings back and forth. In the 2009 story the French guide who hired Quinn to escort Tate is outraged, mostly because of the loss of a bonus the boy's father offered. The father has blamed Quinn, though Quinn suspects a problem with cheap equipment purchased by the French guide.Father and guide both hunt for Quinn while Quinn puzzles over his find. He enlists the help of a woman who is attached to the British Consul in Nepal who has also documented the history of Everest climbs. Once a reader adjusts to the hopping back and forth the stories begin to blend fairly seamlessly, and both contain a lot of action and even some romance. In Josef's story, in particular, he meets a beautiful young woman on the ship heading to India. She's the daughter of a gentile father and a Jewish mother and they're all three fleeing Europe. Their love story becomes one of the key motivators for the actions Josef takes through the remainder of the book. Quinn's story ultimately sends him to Germany to meet an antique dealer regarding the history of the climbing ax, then back up the mountain for more evidence. Farthing manages to weave interesting history and realistic climbing action into a book that includes some wonderful good guys and truly evil bad guys from two different generations. It's a page-turner with an admirable resolution to both stories at the end.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael Richards

    This comes close to the perfect book because how can you go wrong when combining Mount Everest with Nazis? (You heard me right.) Yes, here's a tale of a 1939 secret Nazi mission to be the first to scale Mt. Everest and the modern day attempt to piece together the clues which would tell us whether or not the Germans were the first to summit or not. Of course, it's all fiction (so in the end it doesn't really matter), but what fun it is to follow our intrepid explorers all over Europe and Asia. The This comes close to the perfect book because how can you go wrong when combining Mount Everest with Nazis? (You heard me right.) Yes, here's a tale of a 1939 secret Nazi mission to be the first to scale Mt. Everest and the modern day attempt to piece together the clues which would tell us whether or not the Germans were the first to summit or not. Of course, it's all fiction (so in the end it doesn't really matter), but what fun it is to follow our intrepid explorers all over Europe and Asia. The story really was a lot of fun to read and I enjoyed it immensely. If the author decides to try his hand at writing another novel, I will surely be in line to check it out (as we say at the library).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kat Spitzer

    An interesting take on these subjects. I was totally engaged.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Devyn

    I received this book from Goodreads. Finally a THRILLER novel that actually THRILLS from the beginning to the intense ending. I had NO TIME to breathe. Summit was sooo good. I knew from page one that I was going to devour this book word for word almost faster than I could read it. Mount Everest and Nazis! Yes, perfect combination for a edge of your seat thriller. This book packs a wallop of a historical punch. What if a member of the SS was the first person to conqueror Everest? And not only just s I received this book from Goodreads. Finally a THRILLER novel that actually THRILLS from the beginning to the intense ending. I had NO TIME to breathe. Summit was sooo good. I knew from page one that I was going to devour this book word for word almost faster than I could read it. Mount Everest and Nazis! Yes, perfect combination for a edge of your seat thriller. This book packs a wallop of a historical punch. What if a member of the SS was the first person to conqueror Everest? And not only just summit, but leave a swastika flying at the top with the undeniable and globally circulated picture to prove it? I can only imagine the rage and humiliation of the British and the immense boost in moral of the German troops. Whether or not it effected the outcome or the war it still would have been devastating to the people under Nazi rule and probably upped the body count. Scary thought. Despite this being a fictional 'what if' book Summit is remarkably realistic. Everything about this book is dreadfully plausible and written so skillfully that it puts you right into the action. I've never climbed a mountain before, but with the information from this book I actually might be able to if I ever find myself running from zombies or Nazis. This may have been Harry Farthing's first book, but if he writes another one I'm reading it. No hesitation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aravind

    I had bought this book at the start of this year and have read forty odd other books before getting to it; because I had a feeling that it will be so good I will regret finishing it. After so many months, and after finally reading it, I'm happy (and sad) to say that I was right! In spite of my efforts to read it slowly in order to make it last long, the six hundred plus pages just flew away. The authentic action - especially in the mountains, the well etched characters, the vivid descriptions of I had bought this book at the start of this year and have read forty odd other books before getting to it; because I had a feeling that it will be so good I will regret finishing it. After so many months, and after finally reading it, I'm happy (and sad) to say that I was right! In spite of my efforts to read it slowly in order to make it last long, the six hundred plus pages just flew away. The authentic action - especially in the mountains, the well etched characters, the vivid descriptions of the settings, the heart underlying the parallel stories, and, the mighty, magnificent mother godess - Chomolungma, Sagarmatha or Mount Everest - make 'Summit' an unforgettable experience, to be cherished for a long long time! P.S. The editing of the edition by Westland that I read could have been better, especially in the last few pages...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Received via Blackstone Publishers in exchange for an completely unbiased review. Also posted on Silk & Serif When I first noticed The Summit on NetGalley I was pretty excited. I didn't even stop to read the full synopsis because, well, Everest, mountaineering and intrigue? Sign me up! I was a bit nervous when I realized what The Summit was actually about - Nazis. Fortunately, Farthing's novel was an amazing mix of Nazi historical fiction and mountaineering fiction to make this novel pretty fa Received via Blackstone Publishers in exchange for an completely unbiased review. Also posted on Silk & Serif When I first noticed The Summit on NetGalley I was pretty excited. I didn't even stop to read the full synopsis because, well, Everest, mountaineering and intrigue? Sign me up! I was a bit nervous when I realized what The Summit was actually about - Nazis. Fortunately, Farthing's novel was an amazing mix of Nazi historical fiction and mountaineering fiction to make this novel pretty fantastic. The fact that Farthing also has extensive real life experience in mountain climbing as well as having been blessed with his own experiences on Everest only added an additional layer of authentic suspense when Joseph and Quinn are on the mountain. Neil Quinn, Everest guide extraordinaire, is on his ninth summit on Everest when things go horrifically wrong. The sixteen year old son of a Long Island billionaire begins to have problems breathing and is in danger of extreme frost bite unless they turn back. However, the expedition leader demands Quinn finish the climb, even if he has to carry the boy to the top of the mountain. As Quinn rushes the boy to the safety of their camp, things go awry and Quinn stumbles upon a seventy year old mystery in the form of a frozen body and a Nazi ice axe. As Quinn rushes to learn the truth behind the ice axe before a group of Neo-Nazis, he is dogged by his previous employer who will stop at nothing to keep Quinn from exposing them as the culpable parties in the death of the billionaire's son. In tandem, we follow Joseph Becker, a German soldier caught helping Jews out of Germany and smuggling contraband. In an effort to save the lives of all he cares about, Joseph agrees to climb Everest and plant the Nazi flag on the summit before the British. The reader follows Becker from Nazi Germany, over sea and onto the mountain where the story culminates in Joseph's fate and Quinn's final, desperate attempt to unravel the mystery of the ice axe. In what appears to be Farthing's debut novel, we are thrust into a world of danger and suspense in which the answers to the mysteries are concealed until the very end. The Summit is incredibly well written, fantastically paced and enthralling. The character development was superb with wily Henrietta Richards, righteous Quinn, vengeful Sarron and persecuted Jospeh all creating a cast that interacted in ways that continued to build suspense until the explosive ending. I also loved how well researched the book was with references to Maurice Herzog, George Mallory and other historical greats of mountaineering. In the end, I found Farthing's novel to be thrill ride of a read with a exceptional and strong written style that foreshadows Farthing as a future great novelist. I loved The Summit for its quick pace, supreme style and intriguing mystery - but mostly I loved that although Farthings' novel has a great deal to do with Nazi Germany and mountaineering (things I know very little about), I was still able to follow along and appreciate this novel in a profound way. This novel will appeal to readers who enjoy Nazi historical fiction, mountaineering fiction, suspense, world-trodding mysteries and novels that span generations. I would recommend The Summit to any reader who enjoys some seriously beautiful writing and skillful story telling. The Summit was wonderful.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Toni Osborne

    “Summit” is a part thriller/part mystery that takes us on a fictional adventure set within historical and mountaineering contexts. Mr. Farthing’s passion for mountaineering and his intimate knowledge of the skills, tools and equipment needed to climb famous peaks of the world provided an engrossing novel centered on reaching Mount Everest summit. What an incredible novel. Two men, seventy years apart push for the top of Mount Everest driven by force beyond their control. Modern day climber Neil “Summit” is a part thriller/part mystery that takes us on a fictional adventure set within historical and mountaineering contexts. Mr. Farthing’s passion for mountaineering and his intimate knowledge of the skills, tools and equipment needed to climb famous peaks of the world provided an engrossing novel centered on reaching Mount Everest summit. What an incredible novel. Two men, seventy years apart push for the top of Mount Everest driven by force beyond their control. Modern day climber Neil Quinn’s narrative alternates with Josef Becker’s who in in 1938 was recruited by the SS to be the first to summit Everest. We follow them across two continents as their stories intertwine across history. We have everything including conspiracy, danger and over the top adventure à la James Bond also an evil villain determined to get revenge, Neo Nazis and Russian assassins all over. This is a fast-paced suspense that never lets go. From start to finish something lurks around the corner if not human it is the treacherous climb, the lack of oxygen, the fatigue, the injuries etc. Aside from an excellent plot and pacing we have wonderful set of characters: main players, their sidekicks and the occasional pup-up all are vibrant and so real. This is a well-meshed story hard to put down. If you like a story that combines mountain climbing with a “What if” conspiracy you will enjoy this skillfully written story. Recommended I received an ARC form Blackstone Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Loved the intrigue and suspense. Looking forward to his next book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charles McCormack

    Excellent thriller with lots of interesting historical detail on the various attempts to climb Mount Everest. Had me always wanting to get back to the book after having to deal with annoying reality.

  27. 4 out of 5

    cheryl kell

    A must read I absolutely loved this book. It Kept my interest till the end. I Can't wait for his next book. Bravo! A must read I absolutely loved this book. It Kept my interest till the end. I Can't wait for his next book. Bravo!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    3.5 stars. Fascinating ideas but a bit too long.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    This book is surprisingly good and will break your heart into a million pieces.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kamalika Talukdar

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ( note: I wanted to give 4.8 stars but since the rating doesn't work that way , I'm writing it down) George Mallory was once asked why he wanted to climb Mount Everest .He answered "Because it's there". Everest's very existence governs the human nature and this is very much apparent in Harry Farthing's *Summit*. I read a review in which the reviewer stated(not quoted by word by word) that the very quest of attaining the summit of the highest mountain in the world brings out the best and worst in h ( note: I wanted to give 4.8 stars but since the rating doesn't work that way , I'm writing it down) George Mallory was once asked why he wanted to climb Mount Everest .He answered "Because it's there". Everest's very existence governs the human nature and this is very much apparent in Harry Farthing's *Summit*. I read a review in which the reviewer stated(not quoted by word by word) that the very quest of attaining the summit of the highest mountain in the world brings out the best and worst in humanity and I wholeheartedly agree with it after finishing the book . Farthing's personal climbing experience also helped to give authenticity to the descriptions of climbing and equipment in the book. He also dives into the psychology of mountaineers , of what drives them to do what they do . He interwines historical intrigue and the speed of a thriller with it which for me is a "best of three worlds" . I read the Westland publication which contains 632 pages and I'll was quite intimidated by the number to be honest . Thankfully my reader heart didn't want to give up and surprise surprise , I breezed through it very quickly! Pacing is a huge factor and the pacing of this story won me over very quickly. The writing is elegant , rich And easy to understand. One flaw is that the book provides no glossary for the foreign words and praises used . There are a few translation in the book itself but I had to Google the rest .And not everyone sits with a pencil in hand to mark the words not understood so a glossary would have been helpful. The writer's love, respect and fascination with the mountains is very much visible in his descriptions and made me fall in love with the mountains once more. The stories of the two men runs parallel throughout the book , both filled with mystery ,sadness and the thrill of reaching the summit. Neil Quinn lands in big trouble , with his client dying on the second step and suddenly becoming the bearer of a secret that could potentially change mountaineering history as we know it( and also a madman villain who resembled a comical bollywood villain at times) . Turn 70 years back and we see Josef Becker stuck in a prison of a mission which he has to complete if he wants to see his family alive and on top of that he is branded a prisoner by the Nazi reign because he was a human being who smuggled out Jews to freedom ( go to the seventh cirlcle of Hell Nazis and Hitler.) . Both men are in potentially adverse circumstances . But both have the dignity and strength to face such situations and I think this is what links them despite the drastic differences. I want to point out chapter 90 which is one of my most favourite chapters in the book. Neil is almost dying when he hallucinates Josef and his dependable companion Ang Noru encouraging him to move forward to reach the top. Whether that was truly spirits or mere hallucinations that is upto interpretation ( for romantic purposes I like to think that they have become the ghostly guides of Everest who appeared to Quinn to help him) , the chapter showed the strength of the human spirit through Quinn . Another favourite part is near the end when everyone sees the photograph , the source of all the trouble that Quinn went through and when Henrietta and Quinn travel to south india to give it to the rightful owner . This review is not complete without addressing literally the biggest character in the book : Chomolungma or Everest . She has always fascinated and inspired the human race for ages and when westerners discovered her , the fascination developed to obsession to stand on the summit and announce to the world their might . Tibetans revere her as the mother goddess and mountaineers view her as the ultimate quest .her magnificence is well portrayed in this passage,"Chomolungma is not your friend.She is a goddess with no need for human friends.you are as important and interesting to her as the fly is to you. She will kill you just as readily if you annoy her" Even today Everest continues to claim many lives and allow many to return from her bosom alive. I've always wondered why people were actually willing to risk their lives to reach a mountain top , even if it was the tallest on earth. What could be more important than your own life? Then I went to gurudongmar lake in 2018 which was at nearly 19000 feat and I know it doesn't mean much next to 28000 but I have never climbed a mountain or trained in low oxygen conditions . So , for me, standing there felt like a huge achievement , like I've reached my own personal summit and I believed in that moment I could do anything . And now I think I understand a little why mountain climbers put the Everest summit as their crowning glory. Please read *Summit* if you haven't already!

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