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Jane and the Ghosts of Netley

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Jane Austen, secret agent, is despatched to Netley Lodge to investigate suspicions about the mysterious Sophia Challoner. Is Mrs Challoner really a Bonapartist agent? As conspiracy gathers around Jane, the young novelist is put to the ulitmate test: is she ready to die for her country?


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Jane Austen, secret agent, is despatched to Netley Lodge to investigate suspicions about the mysterious Sophia Challoner. Is Mrs Challoner really a Bonapartist agent? As conspiracy gathers around Jane, the young novelist is put to the ulitmate test: is she ready to die for her country?

30 review for Jane and the Ghosts of Netley

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    It is the fall of 1808 and Jane Austen and her family are in mourning after the sudden death of Elizabeth “Lizzy” Austen, the elegant and enchanting thirty-five year old wife of Jane’s elder brother Edward and mother of eleven children. To entertain the two eldest boys while they stay with her in Southampton, Jane takes them rowing up the Solent to the ruins of Netley Abbey, a Cistercian monastery long abandoned and now a picturesque ruin worthy of a Radcliffe Gothic novel, resplendent with tale It is the fall of 1808 and Jane Austen and her family are in mourning after the sudden death of Elizabeth “Lizzy” Austen, the elegant and enchanting thirty-five year old wife of Jane’s elder brother Edward and mother of eleven children. To entertain the two eldest boys while they stay with her in Southampton, Jane takes them rowing up the Solent to the ruins of Netley Abbey, a Cistercian monastery long abandoned and now a picturesque ruin worthy of a Radcliffe Gothic novel, resplendent with tales of ghosts haunting its halls. Startled by a dark figure lurking in the shadows, Jane is called to immediately attend her friend aboard a Royal Naval vessel anchored nearby. It is an unusual request, but she cannot refuse any summons by the Gentleman Rogue. Yes, Gentle Readers. Lord Harold Trowbridge has re-appeared after two years without any communication with our dear Jane. Her heart is aflutter and her keen mind piqued when he requests her assistance to spy upon a local lady of interest; the beautiful and cunning widow of a French merchant, Sophia Challoner, a Diamond of the First Water who trifled with Lord Trowbridge’s heart, flattering and deceiving him into revealing state secrets to pass along to aid Bonaparte’s cause. Having just returned from Portugal, she now resides at Netley Lodge adjacent to the ruined abbey. Jane’s assignment is to keep “a weathered eye on the activity of that house” and discover how Sophia dispatches her intelligence to France. To aid the investigation, Jane will befriend the dubious and dangerous lady while arson and murders a plenty puzzle the plot, – and Lord Harold and Jane take center stage in the investigation and secretly in each others hearts. The seventh mystery in the series, Barron really hits her stride with more fluid language from Jane’s perspective, the intricate historical details of the Peninsular War against France, and the political intrigue that fuels spies and generates murder. Having so much dialogue devoted to Lord Harold and Jane is a delight, but readers will be disarmed by the concluding pages and dispatched into a crying jag that could take a week to recover from. This is a three hankie weepie that will startle and sear your soul. Great writing makes it all compelling and tragic. *sigh* Seven is definitely not a lucky number for Jane and the Gentleman Rogue. I loved every word, and hated the ending all the same. *sniff* Laurel Ann, Austenprose

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Have ever read a book whose hero or heroine is someone you found yourself relating to on a deep level? Maybe you saw some of yourself in that person; or someone who you wished you were. Maybe that person represented a choice you made -- or one you wish you had or had not made. Regardless, it was a character whose shoes and dress you easily slipped into to live vicariously through their journeys with them. I've long loved and admired Jane Austen and Stephanie Barron's series has afforded me with Have ever read a book whose hero or heroine is someone you found yourself relating to on a deep level? Maybe you saw some of yourself in that person; or someone who you wished you were. Maybe that person represented a choice you made -- or one you wish you had or had not made. Regardless, it was a character whose shoes and dress you easily slipped into to live vicariously through their journeys with them. I've long loved and admired Jane Austen and Stephanie Barron's series has afforded me with an opportunity to see things through Jane's eyes. (Even if it is fiction.) And when Jane met Lord Harold Trowbridge, I met Lord Harold Trowbridge. And as Jane fell in love with him, I fell in love with him. In Jane and the Ghosts of Netley we both lose the man we secretly loved -- and who secretly loved us, back. A short way into this book, I told someone that this was the first of Barron's Jane Austen mysteries that really grabbed me right from page one. I typically find myself slowly easing into the text, like stepping into a cold pool. This time, I was fully immersed from the start. From Jane being summoned to meet Lord Harold aboard a ship to her quick pain in finding that he needed help with "a conquest," to the slow unraveling of Lord Harold's true intentions and feelings for Jane and, finally, the agony of having to say goodbye just as love was requited and admitted. It isn't fair. And I do feel a bit heartbroken. I quickly ran out to the library for the next book in the series, Jane and His Lordship's Legacy, but, I have to admit, the gild is off the rose for me a little bit. I'm definitely going to keep reading, but I will do it in Jane Austen fashion: with a heavy heart.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    Found this book slow going at first. It picked up near the end. I now know I definitely don't like books where Jane is the main character. The ending surprised me and when I think about it now, I don't know why it did, it couldn't have ended any other way. I think it would have been a good mystery read with a different character as it's restricted to what can happen because of having a factual person in the main role. Janeites will possibly enjoy it but it really wasn't for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Adamek

    3.5 stars

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I loved this book. You have to suspend disbelief to read this series (Jane Austen solves crimes that just happen to happen to people around her, almost all of which somehow involve Lord Harold Trowbridge, whom she slowly falls in love with over the course of the first seven books), but I love the characters. I also love how well-researched the time period is. It's like stepping into England of the early 19th century. I was unsure how I felt about where the Lord Harold/Jane romance was going (Jan I loved this book. You have to suspend disbelief to read this series (Jane Austen solves crimes that just happen to happen to people around her, almost all of which somehow involve Lord Harold Trowbridge, whom she slowly falls in love with over the course of the first seven books), but I love the characters. I also love how well-researched the time period is. It's like stepping into England of the early 19th century. I was unsure how I felt about where the Lord Harold/Jane romance was going (Jane Austen in love? How dare she mess with a cultural icon!), but I think it was handled well, although they could have kissed and that would have been okay with me. When Lord Harold died at the end of this book, telling Jane he should have married her years ago and making her promise she would continue to write, I was sobbing and had to pick up the next in the series immediately. The eighth book is titled "Jane and His Lordship's Legacy" -- Jane inherits all of Lord Harold's diaries and letters. I'm looking forward to reading it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    A particularly sad and poignant entry in the series, but wonderful nonetheless. I can't help but find joy in mysteries set among abbey ruins.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    An entertaining tale and interesting as some characters were Catholic recusants. Charles Carroll of Maryland is mentioned as well as Society of Jesus. However, the villain was a tad obvious.

  8. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    This 7th installment finds Jane still living in Southhampton living with her mother, sister and friend while waiting for Mrs. Austen to decide whether to move to one of Edward's holdings in Kent or Hampshire. Jane's curiosity is awakened by the arrival of someone at Netley Abbey. Rumor has it that the Abbey is haunted by ghosts of the monks who used to live there. Jane doesn't quite believe it but it's fun to imagine just the same. She is surprised by a visit from The Gentleman Rogue himself. Lo This 7th installment finds Jane still living in Southhampton living with her mother, sister and friend while waiting for Mrs. Austen to decide whether to move to one of Edward's holdings in Kent or Hampshire. Jane's curiosity is awakened by the arrival of someone at Netley Abbey. Rumor has it that the Abbey is haunted by ghosts of the monks who used to live there. Jane doesn't quite believe it but it's fun to imagine just the same. She is surprised by a visit from The Gentleman Rogue himself. Lord Harold wants Jane to spy on the beautiful but dangerous widow Sophia Challoner who resides at the Abbey. Lord Harold believes that Mrs. Challoner, whom he had known intimately in Portugal, is a French spy. An unlucky accident brings Jane right into Mrs. Challoner's home and her confidence. The widow has nothing good to say about Lord Harold and Jane begins to question whose opinion is correct. The arrival of a stranger from Baltimore arouses Jane's suspicion but she becomes confused again when Maria Fitzherbert, a cast off royal mistress, joins the house party. While Jane socializes with Mrs. Challoner and friends, she dreams of living the life of a tonnish lady by Lord Harold's side. Another mysterious stranger arrives at the Abbey and Mrs. Challoner's maid accuses her employer of witchcraft. With the help of His Lordship's valet, Jane attempts a more in-depth investigation involving hysterical maids, secret tunnels and a stranger called Mon Singeur. Just as Jane thinks she has it all worked out, something goes horribly wrong and one dear to her becomes the victim. This is not the best mystery of the series. It's not too difficult to figure out who Mon Singeur is and what the connection between Mrs. Challoner's houseguests is. I also suspected the villain and I think that Lord Harold was stupid and should have figured it out. This story is darker and more sad than some of the others. Jane spends almost the whole book mooning over Lord Harold and I find it quite out of character for her.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The most amazingly tragic book of this series! I am still sighing over the satisfying yet desperately sad ending. A complete must read, but the impact of the story won't have it's full effect unless you read the 6 previous books. It's an excellent series, so why not?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm heartbroken. I think I fell in love with lord towbridge as Jane did. I knew they would never marry, but I long for more of him :( I think this was one of my favorite of the series but I am in very low spirits at the moment.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This series goes from strength to strength. I suspected the malefactor almost immediately, but the suspense of shifting loyalties kept me spellbound until the heartbreaking ending. I almost cried.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marci

    Here in Jane Austen’s seventh novel-length adventure, the love story arc stretching from the first book finds its tragic climax, but along the way, Jane Austen’s wit and brilliance take center stage. Readers all know that there is no hope that this romance can end happily, but we have had hope that there would be happiness along the way. Stephanie Barron has provided us with a tale that walks along a tense line dividing happiness and grief. (view spoiler)[ I’m not sure how to take the abrupt, clo Here in Jane Austen’s seventh novel-length adventure, the love story arc stretching from the first book finds its tragic climax, but along the way, Jane Austen’s wit and brilliance take center stage. Readers all know that there is no hope that this romance can end happily, but we have had hope that there would be happiness along the way. Stephanie Barron has provided us with a tale that walks along a tense line dividing happiness and grief. (view spoiler)[ I’m not sure how to take the abrupt, close to shocking proposal scene early in the novel when Lord Harold takes Jane out in his closed carriage for a conference on strategy and yet acknowledges what Jane’s mother has broadly hinted, that his actions have compromised Jane’s reputation and that in shallow society’s eyes, he “owes” her a proposal of marriage. Jane herself is distressed by his bluntness and the absence of any hint of love in the exchange. It is the same thing she has rejected twice over: the business of trading herself to satisfy societal expectations. She turns aside the proposal with a bitter joke and they land in a surprising discussion of her writing. Thus the mock proposal turns into the first time when Jane finally shares with him what is truly important to her, who and what she is at the core. The entire scene is full of tension in that we readers are pretty sure they both wish for the romance, but Lord Harold still holds back, and Jane, true to her character, will not be the one to take the initiative, lest she be proven a fool. Jane cannot wholly believe that Lord Harold means herself when, less than halfway through the book, he says to her, “My dear Jane . . . if you have not understood, by this time, that I love but one woman in the world—then we have nothing further to say”—which should have been clear, but it is not clear because Lord Harold has a fatal flaw of not actually being able to judge people clearly. No greater example is there than his flawed judgment of women, as Jane well knows. He falls prey to pretty and scheming women time and again, as he admits to Jane. She knows he prefers physical beauty, and she is no beauty. She knows the world he belongs to values money, class, position, power; all the things she lacks. Apparently he has at last figured out that Jane’s intrinsic worth is more than all the world’s values, but even so, we and Jane are tormented right to the end with waiting for a direct declaration that both gives and asks for a commitment. That fatal flaw in his character cannot accept that for all her actual superiority to himself, Harold should work to deserve Jane as a wife. It is too late when he admits to how much he feels for Jane, and he realizes he should have married her before it was too late—but it is everlastingly too late. The mystery in this novel becomes clear at the inquest into the death of the little maid that Lord Harold’s valet, Orlando, is the duplicitous culprit, and this is a second blatant instance of Lord Harold being unable to judge character rightly. He thinks because he saved Orlando’s life, Orlando is loyal to him. Because Lord Harold doesn’t believe Orlando is guilty yet, unwary readers are thrown off and may still think one of the twin brothers named da Silva is responsible. Orlando is in the pay of the French, spying and reporting, and Sophia Challoner knows it. Orlando set fire to the Itchen shipyard and slit the throat of Mr Dixon, the ship builder. He knocked down Jane and attacked Jeb Hawkins, the Bo'sun’s Mate, and stole his boat when Jeb and Jane discovered him in the tunnel under the Abbey. They weren’t able to recognize him then, so they and we were still thinking da Silva was the man in the long cloak. Lord Harold chases that long cloak into Netley Abbey, and because Harold cannot instantly adjust to his error of judgment, Orlando is able to stab him. Thus the death of Lord Harold contains the elements of a Shakespearean tragedy: the noble hero with the fatal flaw; the affairs of governments and the peace of nations resting on the outcome of the conflict; the internal struggle of the hero against his fatal flaw (that lack of true judgment of other people), shown in his otherwise inexplicable delay in committing himself to Jane Austen; elements of the supernatural in the stories of the ghosts of Netley Abbey; elements of comedic relief in the witty exchanges among characters who interact with the brilliant Miss Austen; and finally, catharsis in the terrible suffering we know Jane undergoes. Two women characters and the men in their circle comprise the major red herrings. The mysteries surrounding these women provide much of the rich layers of this story. Sophia Challoner, the woman Lord Harold Trowbridge identifies to Jane as a formidable French weapon, is a widow who hates him for being responsible for killing a man with whom she was in love in Portugal. Sophia is neither working for France nor for England; she works to help Mrs. Fitzherbert get her son back to safety. Harold is wrong about Sophia, as Jane has thought, and it has been a point that threatened to divide Harold and Jane (and it is yet another instance of Lord Harold judging wrongly). Sophia decides to marry the military da Silva brother and go back to Portugal, which she feels is her home. Mrs. Fitzherbert, the Prince of Wales’s mistress and illegal wife, is the mother of the mysterious American gentleman, Mr Ord. Mr Ord and the French-speaking religious da Silva brother, who is given the title monsignor, are intent upon getting back to America to escape their various problems in England. I’m not sure what Mr Ord was doing visiting England. Supposedly he’s making his “Grand Tour,” but since he was destined for the priesthood, what’s the point? Well, the story needed him to come and confuse matters, and he did a very good job of that. (hide spoiler)] I really liked the detection in this novel. Jane is insightful, clever, witty, and ultimately, correct in all her assumptions and deductions. It is a pleasure to watch her play the detective so well with Lord Harold, and to have her aided by her brother Frank as well as all the other interesting characters who help. Jane and her household are breaking up—her mother, Martha Lloyd, and her sister, Cassandra (who spends the time of this novel in Kent where her brother Edward and his family are mourning the death of his wife) are on the point of accepting Edward’s offer of Chawton Cottage for their future home, and they will move there when the winter is over. Frank and Mary Austen have moved over to the Isle of Wight. This novel is certainly one of the very best of the series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marfita

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! Well, I was more motivated to read this one and it went quickly. Lord Harold wants Jane to inveigle her way into the society of a suspected traitor, who is also beautiful and charming. Sophia Challoner charms Jane and thinks of her as a friend all the while Jane must wrestle with Lord Harold's opinion of Sophia and her own inclinations. Clearly there is a history between LH and Sophia. Jane is now 33 and past harboring hopes of marriage (which she claims would get in Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! Well, I was more motivated to read this one and it went quickly. Lord Harold wants Jane to inveigle her way into the society of a suspected traitor, who is also beautiful and charming. Sophia Challoner charms Jane and thinks of her as a friend all the while Jane must wrestle with Lord Harold's opinion of Sophia and her own inclinations. Clearly there is a history between LH and Sophia. Jane is now 33 and past harboring hopes of marriage (which she claims would get in the way of her writing anyway). And historically we know she dies in her early 40s, single. Still, her mother ping-pongs between thinking LH is gonna pop the question and thinking he's the worst man on earth. Lord Harold actually goes so far as to ask Jane if he should ask for her hand, but in such a way that she thinks it's in jest. And he teaches her to shoot a pistol! Oh, and there's treachery about and, gasp!, Roman Catholicism. And the Prince Regent's mistress/possible wife turns up. Golly! Definite spoiler below: Anyway, Barron apparently kills Lord Harold off in the last line of the book. Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! Where will she get the ... Romantic Tension she created between Jane and Lord Harold? Luckily, Jane is already in mourning for her sister-in-law so the black outfit can serve a double purpose. I don't know what to feel. I'm already heart-broken for this fictional Jane knowing she will never know the love of a really interesting man. The real one might have been more sanguine about her life for all I know. Anyway, onward to the next volume.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    YES. Absolute favorite so far, the ending regarding Jane and Lord Harold, I actually gasped out loud in shock, it was that unexpected. Whew, now that that's out of the way, this volume walked the fine line, for me, of the reader being able to solve the mystery but still be kept guessing as to certain particulars. This, I believe, it was makes a mystery engaging in the first place, and this installment in the series had it in spades. The new faces we met, Sophia, Mr. Ord, were sympathetic, intere YES. Absolute favorite so far, the ending regarding Jane and Lord Harold, I actually gasped out loud in shock, it was that unexpected. Whew, now that that's out of the way, this volume walked the fine line, for me, of the reader being able to solve the mystery but still be kept guessing as to certain particulars. This, I believe, it was makes a mystery engaging in the first place, and this installment in the series had it in spades. The new faces we met, Sophia, Mr. Ord, were sympathetic, interesting, dynamic characters, and I appreciated this feeling more like part of the series by so many recurring characters from last book, given as they remained in Southampton. I could take or leave the whole French spies/Peninsular War/Catholics in England bit, but that is always the case, the characters are more compelling than the backdrop in which they are set. This takes a turn towards more direct information relating to extant historical details on Jane's life - where she is in her writing career, the missive from Ned regarding Chawton - and I'm not sure how I feel about that. It makes one feel that the protagonist is decidedly Jane Austen, which in the previous books had been someone lacking and I tended to think of the character named as Jane Austen merely as a Regency woman of similar circumstances. In delineating these factual details, the author opens herself up to more scrutiny, is this woman really Jane?, that sort of thing, and so my reading was tinged more with the color of doubting whether actual!Jane would do as fictional!Jane does.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Reading Fury

    The Jane series continues but with an unexpected ending that will force a new beginning for Jane. As always, Barron's plot is historically sound and chock full of era-laden detail. A mysterious and very beautiful woman seems to turn Trowbridge's head, leaving jane wondering what he means to her. jane's nearly insufferable mother is at her pain in the derriere best, but I missed Cassandra's presence. She seems a good counter point to Jane, but Martha steps up to fill the void. An interesting pers The Jane series continues but with an unexpected ending that will force a new beginning for Jane. As always, Barron's plot is historically sound and chock full of era-laden detail. A mysterious and very beautiful woman seems to turn Trowbridge's head, leaving jane wondering what he means to her. jane's nearly insufferable mother is at her pain in the derriere best, but I missed Cassandra's presence. She seems a good counter point to Jane, but Martha steps up to fill the void. An interesting perspective is given to those who know Jane Austen's actual history and where the household women in these stories actually wind up. The plot moves along with twists and bits of turns, and Jane becomes more endearing to the reader.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maureen M

    In the seventh book in this series, Jane is enlisted by Lord Harold Trowbridge to help him uncover a spy network bent on doing damage to the British Navy. He asks her to find out what‘s going on at Netley Lodge, where his nemesis Lady Chalonner has settled. Jane isn’t sure that he’s on the right track and that tension adds to the romantic sparks between them. This is a twisty mystery, full of suspicious characters and hidden motives, all set in the true history of the Napoleon wars. Barton sets In the seventh book in this series, Jane is enlisted by Lord Harold Trowbridge to help him uncover a spy network bent on doing damage to the British Navy. He asks her to find out what‘s going on at Netley Lodge, where his nemesis Lady Chalonner has settled. Jane isn’t sure that he’s on the right track and that tension adds to the romantic sparks between them. This is a twisty mystery, full of suspicious characters and hidden motives, all set in the true history of the Napoleon wars. Barton sets herself a challenge in making the love story more overt as she continues to hew closely to Austen’s real life. But she pulls it off and delivers a strong addition to the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Meri-Lyn

    This is another good story in this series. I enjoyed the mystery involved with the spies and subterfuge between France and Britain in this historical period. This one ends very abruptly. I’m very interested in how the series will continue from this point. I really admire the weaving of facts with fiction that the author accomplishes. I continue to learn more history as I look up details while reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Warner

    3.5 stars. I enjoyed the story and the setting. The mystery was not fantastic, and there were plot holes, but the historical references were interesting. I also liked the idea of Jane Austen as a lead character in theory, but in reality the character in the book kept clashing with my idea of the actual Jane Austen. It was so discordant that I eventually had to ignore the link and pretend it wasn’t based on anyone. That said, I still enjoyed the book and would read another in the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angi

    This is by far my favorite of the series. Most of the books start out really slowly and take until you are about 35% in to become more interesting. This one pulled the reader in from the start. The authoress is always known for her twist at the end. This twist was one i did not see coming at all. Definitely my favorite so far.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rahel

    I just love this series so mutch. I am also heartbroken over the Death of one of my favorites. I know that in the Next book it will Not be revealed but i would Really like to know, when did he begin to love her.its such a sad Ending but we all knew there wasnt going to be a Wedding. I still wished for it, cause i like Happy endings.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book left me in tears after the tragic yet romantic ending. I am unable to sufficiently praise Stephanie Barron. She is an incredible writer! This copy had the first chapter of the next book (as a preview) in the series which comforted me...knowing that Jane would be able to go on with no hope of ever seeing the Gentleman Rogue again. So grateful for this series!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    It's somehow very satisfying to imagine Ms Austen as having lived a larger, less disappointed life. This isn't the first one I've read in the series; the author knows her stuff, captures the voice pretty well, and enjoys a little Gothic flair.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    This book made me really sad, but I still really liked it. It also made realize that all the political history that I know about Regency England and Jane Austen’s personal history come from this series. I love that about the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura Balcom

    Once again, this was a well-written book in the style of Jane Austen. Though its genre is ostensibly mystery, it’s actually more of a spy thriller and a romance with a tragic ending that made me cry, an excellent, fun read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cat {Wild Night In}

    I so wanted to love this novel. It's got Jane Austen as the main character, it's set at Netley, it's beautifully written... Sadly the plot was a shade too predictable and Jane Austen was a bit sappy so I didn't love it wholeheartedly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Probably the most fast-paced of the Jane Austen Mystery series! Despite the title there are no ghosts in this book, however, there will be ghosts afterwards! I love that this book includes real people and real places. Netley Abby in Southampton would be a intriguing place to see!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary Overgaard

    Very Rich and Satisfying One of the best Jane Austen mysteries I’ve read. Filled with interesting historical references, believably plotted and fast paced. Fun fashion discussion thrown in. After this I’m anxious to read more.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brooke Criswell

    As ever, enjoyable read that draws the reader into the world. Barron creates engaging, witty, and believable dialog which enhances the sense of the reader participating in the moment of the text. What a surprising resolution to the story. Read it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    I enjoy these novels because of the setting and the pace. I admire the skill the author displays in writing in the style of Jane Austen.

  30. 5 out of 5

    A Hudak

    Not totally convincing as a mystery but this book did provide insights into Jane Austen's time spent in Southampton which is not one of the better known periods of her life.

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