Hot Best Seller

Namath: A Biography

Availability: Ready to download

In between Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan there was Joe Namath, one of the  few sports heroes to transcend the game he played. Novelist and former sports-columnist Mark Kriegel’s bestselling biography of the iconic quarterback details his journey from steel-town pool halls to the upper reaches of American celebrity—and beyond. The first of his kind, Namath enabled a natio In between Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan there was Joe Namath, one of the  few sports heroes to transcend the game he played. Novelist and former sports-columnist Mark Kriegel’s bestselling biography of the iconic quarterback details his journey from steel-town pool halls to the upper reaches of American celebrity—and beyond. The first of his kind, Namath enabled a nation to see sports as show biz. For an entire generation he became a spectacle of booze and broads, a guy who made bachelorhood seem an almost sacred calling, but it was his audacious “guarantee” of victory in Super Bowl III that ensured his legend. This unforgettable portrait brings readers from the gridiron to the go-go nightclubs as Kriegel uncovers the truth behind Broadway Joe and why his legend has meant so much to so many.


Compare

In between Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan there was Joe Namath, one of the  few sports heroes to transcend the game he played. Novelist and former sports-columnist Mark Kriegel’s bestselling biography of the iconic quarterback details his journey from steel-town pool halls to the upper reaches of American celebrity—and beyond. The first of his kind, Namath enabled a natio In between Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan there was Joe Namath, one of the  few sports heroes to transcend the game he played. Novelist and former sports-columnist Mark Kriegel’s bestselling biography of the iconic quarterback details his journey from steel-town pool halls to the upper reaches of American celebrity—and beyond. The first of his kind, Namath enabled a nation to see sports as show biz. For an entire generation he became a spectacle of booze and broads, a guy who made bachelorhood seem an almost sacred calling, but it was his audacious “guarantee” of victory in Super Bowl III that ensured his legend. This unforgettable portrait brings readers from the gridiron to the go-go nightclubs as Kriegel uncovers the truth behind Broadway Joe and why his legend has meant so much to so many.

30 review for Namath: A Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    B. R. Reed

    Solid sports bio. Namath's people came to America in the early 1900s from Hungary and settled in Beaver Falls, PA. (The Hungarian name Nemet became Namath.) His father worked hard at the local steel mill. Joe was the youngest of four sons and an adopted daughter and they all lived in a working class neighborhood. Joe was a natural athlete with great hand-eye coordination and he excelled at baseball, basketball and football. He also had massive hands which contributed to his ball handling abiliti Solid sports bio. Namath's people came to America in the early 1900s from Hungary and settled in Beaver Falls, PA. (The Hungarian name Nemet became Namath.) His father worked hard at the local steel mill. Joe was the youngest of four sons and an adopted daughter and they all lived in a working class neighborhood. Joe was a natural athlete with great hand-eye coordination and he excelled at baseball, basketball and football. He also had massive hands which contributed to his ball handling abilities. His HS football coach was an excellent teacher and taught him the fundamentals of QBing. Joe was a bit of a hustler, hung out at the local pool hall and was not much of a student. A HS girlfriend did much of his homework. His SAT scores were low and not good enough for most colleges. (I'm surprised no one took the test for him.) His grades and test scores were not good enough for Maryland so he headed south to Alabama and came under the tutelage of Bear Bryant. As different as they were they actually had a good relationship. He had three great years at Alabama that ended with a heroic effort in the 1965 Orange Bowl, a 21-17 loss to TX. Four yrs later he would return to the Orange Bowl and his New York Jets team would upset the heavily favored Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl 3 (perhaps the most famous of all Super Bowls). The following yr he played in his final playoff game. He lost more NFL games than he won, he threw way more interceptions than TDs and he probably hung on a little too long. But when he was on the man could hurl a football. The strong arm with the quick release. He could also take a beating on the field and at times he did. The book covers his football career, the competition between the NFL and AFL pre-merger, Sonny Werblin (an interesting man), his drinking and womanizing, Bachelors III, Noxzema & Farrah, CC & Co, his failed marriage etc. "Baby Joey" is now 74 and I believe he currently resides down in FL. He is probably more responsible than anyone in turning pro football into show business, for better or for worse. He was one of a kind. You can't help but like the guy with his smile, charm and easy ways. 3+ stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    Tremendously exhaustive and detailed look at the cocky renegade quarterback who led the Jets to victory in Super Bowl III and whose rebellious, laid-back charm perfectly epitomized the impact of the turbulent Sixties in the world of sports. Joe Namath is unique among sports legends. Like Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantle, he was adored by multitudes, many of whom had no idea how talented he was or how much suffering he endured off the playing field. But unlike Mantle and Ruth, Joe in private was actual Tremendously exhaustive and detailed look at the cocky renegade quarterback who led the Jets to victory in Super Bowl III and whose rebellious, laid-back charm perfectly epitomized the impact of the turbulent Sixties in the world of sports. Joe Namath is unique among sports legends. Like Babe Ruth or Mickey Mantle, he was adored by multitudes, many of whom had no idea how talented he was or how much suffering he endured off the playing field. But unlike Mantle and Ruth, Joe in private was actually a very different man from the hero of the public eye. The author works patiently with hundreds of friends and family members to reveal the real truth about Joe, which is far more compelling than the easy legend of endless victory, endless charm, and endless sexual conquests. Joe's image was that of an easy-going good-time guy who loved bending the rules and teasing authority figures. A whole generation of aging, alcoholic sports writers hated him for being a cocky know-it-all who "guaranteed" victory over the other team. They saw him as a creepy long-hair who undermined the values of conventional masculinity. In actual fact Joe was a very disciplined, private man who endured an enormous amount of pain and kept his emotions in check, not because he was pursuing a paycheck but because that was his understanding of what a man did. The boozed up clowns in the press box wanted an icon of Sixties decadence they could hate. (Because they could never confront their own decadence, natch!) So they invented the idea of Broadway Joe, the decadent good-looking guy who breaks the rules and sneers while he gets away with it -- just like Jamie Lannister only sexier! But the irony is that the real Joe Namath was closer to Ned Stark -- the battered warrior who refuses to back away from what he thinks is right even when his enemies are sacking him on every play. As a kid I knew Namath had bad knees and played hurt but until I read this book I had no idea what that really meant. Joe's ability to tolerate unbearable pain game after game, year after year, is impossible not to admire and even revere. At the same time, Joe's problems with alcohol become a lot easier to understand when you realize the level of sheer physical discomfort he had to live through every single day, minute, and year of his life. And when you watch him in old age, desperately trying to hustle gullible senior citizens on cable TV, you have to ask, what happened to Joe? What happened to Joe's money? He sacrificed so much and ended up like this? Why? Was it worth it? I took off one star because the book ends around 2004 and doesn't really explain what Joe has been up to the last fifteen years -- and how his money problems have driven him back onto TV in the most demeaning circumstances possible. Also, Kriegel as a writer is nothing special. His style runs to sentimental sports writer cliche, like saying Joe is "the strong silent type" or that his ability to take punishment is "in the blood." It's in the blood? Why not just put on a Hungarian accent in honor of Joe's roots, and go completely Bela Lugosi and say, "the blood IS the life, Mr. Namath!"

  3. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I'm a big football fan, although not a huge Joe Namath fan. But this book was pretty intersting reading and seemed very complete and balanced. Enjoyable. I'm a big football fan, although not a huge Joe Namath fan. But this book was pretty intersting reading and seemed very complete and balanced. Enjoyable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    This was a thoroughly researched and intriguing look into the life of a man who is an icon in the world of sports and marketing. There was nothing particularly radical or pioneering about Joe Namath. He was a very talented athlete, but also a flawed one. He made the leap from man to legend by guaranteeing victory in a Super Bowl, but this aparently was done as much to shut up an annoying heckler than due to supreme confidence on Namath's part. The Jets victory in Super Bowl III was mostly a resu This was a thoroughly researched and intriguing look into the life of a man who is an icon in the world of sports and marketing. There was nothing particularly radical or pioneering about Joe Namath. He was a very talented athlete, but also a flawed one. He made the leap from man to legend by guaranteeing victory in a Super Bowl, but this aparently was done as much to shut up an annoying heckler than due to supreme confidence on Namath's part. The Jets victory in Super Bowl III was mostly a result of their superior defense, some good breaks, and just enough big plays on offense to pull out a fairly dull game. But the prediction made by the man who played the most prominent position for his team established a legacy that would only become enhanced by time. As a testament to greatness during a period of turbulent change as the stuffiness of the 50's gave way to the revolution of the 60's and the "have your cake and eat it too" excess of the 70's, Joe Namath was a product of fortuitous circumstance. To his credit, like Frank Sinatra he did things his way and this ultimately turned out to be very lucrative for him. As a man, he comes off as an amiable drunk who is not particularly loyal to those who stood by him and those he fought alongside with. Mostly he is loyal to the protection of his legacy, particularly the revenue it generates, and to his children. He has made good money by living on his past but knows better than to live in it. Joe Namath's greatest accomplishments were backing up a prediction with the help of players he was isolated from who were alienated by the double standard put in place for him, and living a bachelor lifestyle that created an image he was able to capitalize on. By the end of the book he is a heartbroken (left by his wife) alcoholic loner rather than a carefree alcoholic surrounded by hangers on but not necessarily true friends. His life goes on, making his living autobiography a work in process. As for the bio adeptly written about him by Mark Kriegel, I found it be engaging and informative. Longtime football fans will especially enjoy it, particularly Jets fans looking to relive past glory.

  5. 5 out of 5

    carl theaker

    When I was a young teenager and just getting interested in the gridiron games I asked my Dad about the football player on the TV with white shoes. He said "That's Joe Namath", and I said, "I'm going root for him." Author Kriegel explains that during Joe's retirement that's what everyone does when they see him-- tell him what they were doing at some memorable point where Joe affected their lives. I went out and bought some track shoes that were white, and wore them for all my sandlot football game When I was a young teenager and just getting interested in the gridiron games I asked my Dad about the football player on the TV with white shoes. He said "That's Joe Namath", and I said, "I'm going root for him." Author Kriegel explains that during Joe's retirement that's what everyone does when they see him-- tell him what they were doing at some memorable point where Joe affected their lives. I went out and bought some track shoes that were white, and wore them for all my sandlot football games. This bio is certainly thorough, with 50 pages of notes to back up the story. It's as well researched as the tales of real historical figures, say Thomas Jefferson. Kriegel starts at the arrival of Joe's Grandparents from the old country and continues from there. The high school quarterbacking runs a little long for me, but that might be because I was interested in getting to the era where I 'met' him as a QB for the Jets. You do get a lot of insights into Joe's personal life, the bordering on hoodlum sorts of friends, his cagy negotiaing, the right guy in the right place at the right time for marketing a personna and its impact on the AFL-NFL. Though at 440pages, there's already enough to read, but a few things seemed missing, some input from a fan, (say me,) no comments from Buddy Ryan who was a Jets defensive coach for the Super Bowl 3, wonder if Buddy had already crossed Kriegel somewhere else along the line? And the big games lack some drama when retold. Perhaps Kriegel was trying to make the book less football and more main stream? If you have an interest in Joe, it's a good read, and if in football or his personna at all, it's still worth a go long!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bookmarks Magazine

    The divided opinion about Namath seems driven as much by its subject as by its author. Critics extol the coverage of Namath's early career, but when the story turns post-football, many reviewers flinch. It is as if they can't reconcile their memories of Broadway Joe with the drunken, luckless-in-love man he became (sadly demonstrated last year on live television when an inebriated Namath twice told ESPN's sideline reporter Suzy Kolber that he wanted to kiss her). Kriegel, a former sports reporte The divided opinion about Namath seems driven as much by its subject as by its author. Critics extol the coverage of Namath's early career, but when the story turns post-football, many reviewers flinch. It is as if they can't reconcile their memories of Broadway Joe with the drunken, luckless-in-love man he became (sadly demonstrated last year on live television when an inebriated Namath twice told ESPN's sideline reporter Suzy Kolber that he wanted to kiss her). Kriegel, a former sports reporter, goes heavy on play-by-play breakdowns

  7. 5 out of 5

    James Carter

    Today, there are two mutually exclusive groups, die-hard fans and haters, when it comes to speaking of Joe Namath. The former will point out how Namath changed the face of NFL by the virtue of his Super Bowl III victory which legitimatized the fledgling league AFL, and the latter will point out his junk statistics, often the touchdown-interception ratio, that don't stand up at all today. There are three ways to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The player has to either: A. win cham Today, there are two mutually exclusive groups, die-hard fans and haters, when it comes to speaking of Joe Namath. The former will point out how Namath changed the face of NFL by the virtue of his Super Bowl III victory which legitimatized the fledgling league AFL, and the latter will point out his junk statistics, often the touchdown-interception ratio, that don't stand up at all today. There are three ways to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The player has to either: A. win championships, B. pile up mindblowing statistics, or C. revolutionize the game. Most players who make it fall in category B quite often while some do for A more than B, yet nearly nobody does for C. Well...guess what? Joe Namath did all of the three, and that's why he is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Joe Namath was the first quarterback to be Rookie of the Year. He was the first quarterback to throw for over 4,000 yards (which was accomplished in 14 games), a record in 1967 that wasn't broken until Dan Fouts did it in 16 games twelve years later. By the way, no Jets quarterback has ever thrown for over 4,000 yards since 1967. In fact, many of Namath's Jets records still stand to this day, a remarkable achievement given the fact that the game was completely different back then with very little protection for quarterbacks. In the 9/24/72 shootout game against the Baltimore Colts, Joe Namath and Johnny Unitas combined for 872 yards and 8 touchdowns with Namath netting 496 yards and 6 touchdowns. Never in the history of pro football has anyone seen this kind of aerial display before. Joe Namath was the first real superstar in NFL history, and his Beatles-like popularity attracted a huge number of fans, both women and men alike. Because of him and because of Super Bowl III, NFL, after merging with AFL, grew immensely in TV viewership. The very first Monday Night Football game featured Joe Namath against the Cleveland Browns. It's safe to say that Joe Namath won the first Super Bowl in existence because it was officially named as AFL-NFL World Championship Game in the first two. If it wasn't for Joe Namath, it would have been very hard to envision NFL as it is today which means there would be no Kansas City Chiefs, Miami Dolphins, New England Patriots, Oakland Raiders, New York Jets, Buffalo Bills, Denver Broncos, Cincinnati Bengals, San Diego Chargers, and Tennessee Titans (Houston Oilers). His Super Bowl III victory forever changed the landscape, and that's why he is a football icon. Yes, Joe Namath wasn't the same again afterwards, and yes, his career would have been totally different if he had two healthy knees given the current advancement of medical technology. Yet it's still remarkable what Joe Namath was able to accomplish given his limitations and he had the greatest quick release ever which wasn't seen again until Dan Marino came along. Today, when people think of Joe Namath, they think of the Suzy Kolber incident which ruined his reputation along with alcoholism, and that's why people nowadays have no clue of what he did back then. Now, back to Namath, it's a very long book with the writer getting in the way with his stupid "look at me" attitude, something that I doubt the former New York Jet quarterback would have approved, yet it's revealing of who Namath was. The biography of his life becomes darker toward the end, exposing him for never being a team player who was constantly surrounded by people of questionable motives. Hence, if I was ever asked this question whether or not I would pick Joe Namath for my all-time NFL team, I will have to honestly say no. I regard him as the most popular player in New York Jets football history which will never be topped and he was in the right place at the right time, but the greatest player in team's history is rightfully Don Maynard. Most importantly, to settle the all-time debate, Joe Namath truly deserves to be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. All in all, because of Namath, there's a lot to appreciate about Joe Namath, and I learned a lot about him and the history of NFL/AFL. By the way, forget Namath's so-called Super Bowl guarantee. That was completely blown out of proportion years later, and I didn't even want to acknowledge it in the first place.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Joe Namath was a high school star in every sport that involved a ball and was pursued by over 50 colleges and universities to play football while also having received a lucrative professional baseball contract offer. The University of Alabama and Paul "Bear" Bryant won the rights to Joe mostly due to a poor showing on a college entrance exam. Other than his absentee father, Bryant was the first male figure that Joe respected. As a Jets rookie, Namath received a lucrative contract some thirty tim Joe Namath was a high school star in every sport that involved a ball and was pursued by over 50 colleges and universities to play football while also having received a lucrative professional baseball contract offer. The University of Alabama and Paul "Bear" Bryant won the rights to Joe mostly due to a poor showing on a college entrance exam. Other than his absentee father, Bryant was the first male figure that Joe respected. As a Jets rookie, Namath received a lucrative contract some thirty times what veteran players were receiving at the time. In the end, his professional win|loss record was not that impressive but he did hold a number of records including passing for over 4000 yards in a season. A season that only included 14 games as opposed to the modern-day schedule of 16 games. That record stood for more than a decade. Growing up I recall watching Joe "Willie" Namath lead the AFL New Jets to victory over the heavily favored Baltimore Colts in the Super Bowl. Prior to the game Namath guaranteed victory over the Colts an eighteen point favorite in the game. In spite of my father denouncing Namath and his lifestyle outside of football, I was smitten with his swagger. Joe was everything I was not supposed to emulate. He drank, he opposed authority figures and he viewed women as a conquest. In today's vernacular Joe Namath was a "playa"

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marty

    Very interesting -- well researched. The writer picked out info from other reporters private notes. Lots of things about Namath I didn't know (like he was around when the U of Alabama was integrated). Very interesting -- well researched. The writer picked out info from other reporters private notes. Lots of things about Namath I didn't know (like he was around when the U of Alabama was integrated).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bret Eubank

    Remember when Namath was tipsy on MNF hitting on Suzy Kobler? Welp, this book tells the story of how Joe ended up that way--and much more. Engrossing read with plenty of details-on and off the field.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve Green

    A great book about the life and times of one of the all time quarterback greats.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark Warren

    Great biography on Broadway Joe. Must read for fans.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Kriegel's book opened my eyes about Joe Namath in writing this biography. Growing up in Upstate New York, we didn't get all the stories about Namath and his partying, womanizing and his special treatment given to him while his Jets teammates were held to different standards. I admired his talent, especially given his medical handicap, to win lead the Jets to the Super Bowl III title and keep the Jets competitive for a few years. But by reading Kriegel's work, one has to wonder what Joe Namath co Kriegel's book opened my eyes about Joe Namath in writing this biography. Growing up in Upstate New York, we didn't get all the stories about Namath and his partying, womanizing and his special treatment given to him while his Jets teammates were held to different standards. I admired his talent, especially given his medical handicap, to win lead the Jets to the Super Bowl III title and keep the Jets competitive for a few years. But by reading Kriegel's work, one has to wonder what Joe Namath could have been with a set of healthy knees and a tamer, more responsible lifestyle. Throughout the biography, I felt Kriegel did a wonderful job of balancing the highkights of Namath's life, his football career and the events that followed his retirement from football. It is balanced with the events of life -- joyous events like his love for his daughters, the love of family, and countered by his addiction to booze, blondes and bars and a lifestyle that seemed wonderful, but often tainted the image that many of us had growing up with #12. In his book "The Paolantonio Report," Sal Paolantonio called Joe Namath the most overrated quarterback in the history of the NFL. After reading Kriegel's work, I am inclined to agree with Paolantonio. I am glad things are better for Broadway Joe, and there is merit to Kriegel's statements that Namath changed the way business in pro football is conducted and how the game is played -- merit that may have warranted his place in Canton. He had a good career, he got into the Hall of Fame, and he has a Super Bowl ring. Can you image what he could have done with healthy knees and a different lifestyle. This is an excellent book for those wanting history on Namath, the early AFL, the NFL merger and the "games" people play in schmoozing, coddling and protecting "big ticket players" like Namath.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Corleto-Bales

    An exhaustive biography of the first "modern" athlete, Joe Namath came from the milltown of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania to become the NFL's highest paid player and a pitchman for everything from aftershave to typewriters. He led the New York Jets to victory in Super Bowl III in 1969, proving that the AFL could play with the traditional NFL and anointing the Super Bowl as a social and mercantile holiday in the United States; (the two previous Super Bowls were routs). Namath was a golden boy jock w An exhaustive biography of the first "modern" athlete, Joe Namath came from the milltown of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania to become the NFL's highest paid player and a pitchman for everything from aftershave to typewriters. He led the New York Jets to victory in Super Bowl III in 1969, proving that the AFL could play with the traditional NFL and anointing the Super Bowl as a social and mercantile holiday in the United States; (the two previous Super Bowls were routs). Namath was a golden boy jock who excelled at baseball and basketball, too, but got to the University of Alabama and Bear Bryant on his football skills. Hobbled since high school with bad knees, Namath played 13 seasons in professional football with every ailment you can think of and played well beyond what he should have. This is a very American story and should be made into a movie. Great line from the book: "The old NFL guys thought this [the commercial aspect of pro football as it emerged in the 1960s:] was still about football." Namath was the first really anti-hero athlete who partied hard, played around with women as a happy bachelor and kept his hair long. He was first called "Broadway Joe" after a Sports Illustrated cover in 1965, and the name was used derisively by his teammates--at first. I'm sorry I mostly missed the Namath era, only really remembering him as a sitting on the bench for the Rams.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Bateman

    A decent enough biography of Namath, but one that leans a bit too heavily on short, flashy sentences ("He tossed it to Sauer. Touchdown. That's how Joe did it: it was in the blood") and previously published accounts of Namath's gridiron exploits (e.g., pieces in Sports Illustrated, Paul Zimmerman's fantastic The Last Season of Weeb Ewbank, Rick Telander's Joe Namath and the Other Guys, etc.). And sometimes Kriegel doesn't even get it right when he's using a very easy-to-read printed source, such A decent enough biography of Namath, but one that leans a bit too heavily on short, flashy sentences ("He tossed it to Sauer. Touchdown. That's how Joe did it: it was in the blood") and previously published accounts of Namath's gridiron exploits (e.g., pieces in Sports Illustrated, Paul Zimmerman's fantastic The Last Season of Weeb Ewbank, Rick Telander's Joe Namath and the Other Guys, etc.). And sometimes Kriegel doesn't even get it right when he's using a very easy-to-read printed source, such as when he writes that Weeb Ewbank shipped a past-his-prime Don Maynard to Philadelphia. If he'd bothered reading Zimmerman's book carefully, or even pulled up Maynard's profile on Wikipedia or thefootballcube.com, he'd see that the legendary wide receiver was traded to Don Coryell's St. Louis Cardinals. Nevertheless, the interviews with Namath's myriad of ex-friends are spot-on, and the portrait of the quarterback that is presented here seems reasonably accurate. It's probably for the best that Namath--a secretive and rather odd individual--chose not to speak with Kriegel, since it seems unlikely that he would have been very forthcoming. The most interesting part of the book concerned Namath's married life, off-Broadway career, and bizarre divorce (his wife left him for a plastic surgeon who, in her words "wasn't a jock" and "had such a cool ponytail").

  16. 5 out of 5

    Scott Martin

    Few athletes generate as much of a legendary aura as Joe Namath. The Guarantee, Super Bowl III, the swinging reputation, the pantyhose commericals...all of those still make the man Joe Namath as famous now as he was 40+ years ago as a Jets Quarterback. The book does provide some insight into those stories and legends. Namath was the superstar football player who was a trend-setter in many ways. The star treatment, the constant publicity, and the public battles w/ substance abuse (in his case, al Few athletes generate as much of a legendary aura as Joe Namath. The Guarantee, Super Bowl III, the swinging reputation, the pantyhose commericals...all of those still make the man Joe Namath as famous now as he was 40+ years ago as a Jets Quarterback. The book does provide some insight into those stories and legends. Namath was the superstar football player who was a trend-setter in many ways. The star treatment, the constant publicity, and the public battles w/ substance abuse (in his case, alcoholism...especially later in life)...there is no denying his talent (hard to believe that he actually played at Bama...under the Bear, and was one of the Bear's favorites). The writing style of this book would not pass muster in most writing classes (the author is a columnist on Fox Sports (I don't think his style as good as Peter King's...or even other columnists on Fox Sports). Still, you read this, and you wonder a couple of things...how important Super Bowl III was to Namath and football (his pro career outside of Super Bowl III was not all that grand)...how overrated he was at times...and you wonder what he could have done with a little more focus, a little less partying, and modern medical advances in knee repairs.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Kriegel delivered exactly what I was hoping for in a bio of Joe: insight into the man and an understanding of what "Broadway Joe" meant in the world of professional football, sports and American culture. The authors delivers a good balance between the action--the games, the partying, the relationships--and the context for that action. Joe's role in Bear Bryant's legacy? Check. The AFL-NFL merger? Check. The Super Bowl? Check. Modern sports marketing? Check. The book hits the important events whi Kriegel delivered exactly what I was hoping for in a bio of Joe: insight into the man and an understanding of what "Broadway Joe" meant in the world of professional football, sports and American culture. The authors delivers a good balance between the action--the games, the partying, the relationships--and the context for that action. Joe's role in Bear Bryant's legacy? Check. The AFL-NFL merger? Check. The Super Bowl? Check. Modern sports marketing? Check. The book hits the important events while presenting a portrait of the man that seems honest and ends up--to me--be very affecting. Neither a mash note nor an expose to Joe Namath, Kriegel presents a life without apology or soul-gazing. If you ever had an inkling that you might want to know more about Joe Namath the man and the football player or just have an interest in the modern world of the NFL and how we got here, "Namath" is one I'd recommend for you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    A book I came across when I was looking for somehting else. I had forgotten I'd read when it first came out. In my teens and early 20's JOE willie Namath was the man. His guarantee of a Jets victory over the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III changed the games course. Remmeber he played for the upstart AFL and it was the 1st victory for the new league. Namath signed for a then huge sum of 400,000 dollars. You wont find him in many record books since injuries and probably a pretty active night lif A book I came across when I was looking for somehting else. I had forgotten I'd read when it first came out. In my teens and early 20's JOE willie Namath was the man. His guarantee of a Jets victory over the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III changed the games course. Remmeber he played for the upstart AFL and it was the 1st victory for the new league. Namath signed for a then huge sum of 400,000 dollars. You wont find him in many record books since injuries and probably a pretty active night life kept him from setting all kinds of records and seriously shortened his career. The book captures the essence of the man and his courage to play when he could barely walk. He was one of the 1st players to show the show biz style of sports, it is a great portrait of the man.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Joe Namath is not my favorite football player but I enjoyed listening to this book. It was not the biography of Joe that is really so interesting, but Joe Namath's years in football were a pretty exciting time. The author goes into wonderful long descriptions of the founding of the AFL, the founding of the Jets, race and football, gambling and football, TV and football, rise of the big salaried athlete, and athletes and commercial endorsements. But Joe was interesting too. He and I are the same Joe Namath is not my favorite football player but I enjoyed listening to this book. It was not the biography of Joe that is really so interesting, but Joe Namath's years in football were a pretty exciting time. The author goes into wonderful long descriptions of the founding of the AFL, the founding of the Jets, race and football, gambling and football, TV and football, rise of the big salaried athlete, and athletes and commercial endorsements. But Joe was interesting too. He and I are the same age so much of the political and social world corresponded to mine. I hope my knees are in better shape. This was a great book for the fall football season.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I will have to admit that sports biographies are still my favorite choice in reading. I was very impressed by this biography of Joe Namath. The author produced a well researched book that gave a lot of insight into an American Sports icon. For those of us who were just young enough not to have remembered seeing Joe play football, I enjoyed the details on each of his seasons that the author provides. Ultimately, the potrait shows how those who seemingly have everything, are usually defected in ma I will have to admit that sports biographies are still my favorite choice in reading. I was very impressed by this biography of Joe Namath. The author produced a well researched book that gave a lot of insight into an American Sports icon. For those of us who were just young enough not to have remembered seeing Joe play football, I enjoyed the details on each of his seasons that the author provides. Ultimately, the potrait shows how those who seemingly have everything, are usually defected in major areas. Namath is no exception to the phenomena.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brian Souter

    This is a real worthwhile read . The author has done extensive research in all aspects of Joe Namath's life from early childhood on - everyone who had influenced and mentored him and ultimately how he impacted American football not only at the professional level but at the college level as well. This is a no nonense biography, more about grit and pain and bad decisions than his youthful playboy lifestyle. Personally I feel Joe Namath is an icon. And I believe that if you read this book you will th This is a real worthwhile read . The author has done extensive research in all aspects of Joe Namath's life from early childhood on - everyone who had influenced and mentored him and ultimately how he impacted American football not only at the professional level but at the college level as well. This is a no nonense biography, more about grit and pain and bad decisions than his youthful playboy lifestyle. Personally I feel Joe Namath is an icon. And I believe that if you read this book you will think so too..."I guarantee it!"

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I grew up wanting to be a quarterback like Joe Namath. He was an incredible talent. This book does a great job showing the influences and events that made him the player he was, from his small hometown to Alabama and then to New York City. And it's a very descriptive account of all the other aspects of Joe's life I didn't know. Alcohol can be a pain reliever, but then it can also be a pain creator, too. God bless you, Joe. I grew up wanting to be a quarterback like Joe Namath. He was an incredible talent. This book does a great job showing the influences and events that made him the player he was, from his small hometown to Alabama and then to New York City. And it's a very descriptive account of all the other aspects of Joe's life I didn't know. Alcohol can be a pain reliever, but then it can also be a pain creator, too. God bless you, Joe.

  23. 5 out of 5

    The American Conservative

    'Given Joe’s stardom, Kriegel observes that “the only place for him to hit rock bottom” was on national TV. Namath went into rehab and sobered up, and Kriegel concludes the unfinished saga of Broadway Joe with the star “tanned, energized, healthy,” his “teeth … as white as his shirt.” Still super after all these years.' Read the full review, "Super Bowl Superhero," on our website: http://www.theamericanconservative.co... 'Given Joe’s stardom, Kriegel observes that “the only place for him to hit rock bottom” was on national TV. Namath went into rehab and sobered up, and Kriegel concludes the unfinished saga of Broadway Joe with the star “tanned, energized, healthy,” his “teeth … as white as his shirt.” Still super after all these years.' Read the full review, "Super Bowl Superhero," on our website: http://www.theamericanconservative.co...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    What made this biography so good for me wasn't just the profile specifically on Namath himself, but the multifaceted look on the elements around him; notably the TV business that hitched its wagon around him. Thanks to Kriegel's work, I am reminded that truthfully, there's nothing new under the sun. What made this biography so good for me wasn't just the profile specifically on Namath himself, but the multifaceted look on the elements around him; notably the TV business that hitched its wagon around him. Thanks to Kriegel's work, I am reminded that truthfully, there's nothing new under the sun.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Eilenfeldt

    Not a big football fan, this book was a little out of my norms. However, I loved Kriegel's bio of Pete Maravich and decided to give this a try. It was thoroughly enjoyable. Kriegel did a great job explaining where Namath fit in pop culture both as Brodway Joe and now. Additionally, I found the pacing to be better than "Pistol." Not a big football fan, this book was a little out of my norms. However, I loved Kriegel's bio of Pete Maravich and decided to give this a try. It was thoroughly enjoyable. Kriegel did a great job explaining where Namath fit in pop culture both as Brodway Joe and now. Additionally, I found the pacing to be better than "Pistol."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Scott Mccloud

    Best NFL book ever? Especially if you are a fan of Nick Toshes bio's like "Dino," who this guy is clearly influenced by and whom the author acknowledges. Read it during football season you will become a fan. Best NFL book ever? Especially if you are a fan of Nick Toshes bio's like "Dino," who this guy is clearly influenced by and whom the author acknowledges. Read it during football season you will become a fan.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Doy

    I know to a lot of people (people who don't understand how great the New York Jets are), Joe Namath is just some football player. However, the greatest writers of our times couldn't invent a more colorful character. I know to a lot of people (people who don't understand how great the New York Jets are), Joe Namath is just some football player. However, the greatest writers of our times couldn't invent a more colorful character.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I truly enjoyed this book but was left with such a sad impression of Namath's life. His night club feverish antics were amusing alongside his drive to play and win on a completely busted knee... the sad part is how alone he was as he became middle aged, unremembered for the most part. I truly enjoyed this book but was left with such a sad impression of Namath's life. His night club feverish antics were amusing alongside his drive to play and win on a completely busted knee... the sad part is how alone he was as he became middle aged, unremembered for the most part.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ardy Marie

    Well, this man had an interesting life and was quite the ladies man. I don't know how he missed hitting on me. Maybe because I was 12. Worth Reading, he was a good guy who did impressive things and was a people person. Well, this man had an interesting life and was quite the ladies man. I don't know how he missed hitting on me. Maybe because I was 12. Worth Reading, he was a good guy who did impressive things and was a people person.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Joe Cool, Joe Willie namath, Broadway Joe, no matter what you call him, Joe Namath was the godfather of of the pro ball player being like a rock star. This book covers the ups and downs of Joe Cool and it also sheds light on the early days of the modern NFL!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.