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Nancy Mitford: The Biography Edited from Nancy Mitford's Letters

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Nancy Mitford was witty, intelligent, often acerbic, a great tease and an acute observer of upper-class British idiosyncrasies. With the publication of "The Pursuit of Love" and "Love in a Cold Climate" (advised by Evelyn Waugh), she became a huge bestselling author and has remained a household name ever since. A few years before she died, she had started to collect materi Nancy Mitford was witty, intelligent, often acerbic, a great tease and an acute observer of upper-class British idiosyncrasies. With the publication of "The Pursuit of Love" and "Love in a Cold Climate" (advised by Evelyn Waugh), she became a huge bestselling author and has remained a household name ever since. A few years before she died, she had started to collect material and letters to use for an autobiography. Her devastating illness prevented her from writing this memoir, but in 1974 Harold Acton, her close friend, completed her project on the basis of what she had collected in a work that is a witty tribute to her larger-than-life personality.


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Nancy Mitford was witty, intelligent, often acerbic, a great tease and an acute observer of upper-class British idiosyncrasies. With the publication of "The Pursuit of Love" and "Love in a Cold Climate" (advised by Evelyn Waugh), she became a huge bestselling author and has remained a household name ever since. A few years before she died, she had started to collect materi Nancy Mitford was witty, intelligent, often acerbic, a great tease and an acute observer of upper-class British idiosyncrasies. With the publication of "The Pursuit of Love" and "Love in a Cold Climate" (advised by Evelyn Waugh), she became a huge bestselling author and has remained a household name ever since. A few years before she died, she had started to collect material and letters to use for an autobiography. Her devastating illness prevented her from writing this memoir, but in 1974 Harold Acton, her close friend, completed her project on the basis of what she had collected in a work that is a witty tribute to her larger-than-life personality.

30 review for Nancy Mitford: The Biography Edited from Nancy Mitford's Letters

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sketchbook

    Nancy Mitford (1904-1973) could not be bothered with a daily journal. However, she loved writing letters and they comprise the tasty pate de foie of this memoir. (The internet has killed letter-writing; future memoirs & bios will be very boring I fear). In the early 50s Nancy, a Francophile, adapted a French comedy, "The Little Hut," that ran for 3 years in London. The story of a husband who shares his wife with her lover when all are stranded on a tropical island, "Hut" dismayed Puritan theatre Nancy Mitford (1904-1973) could not be bothered with a daily journal. However, she loved writing letters and they comprise the tasty pate de foie of this memoir. (The internet has killed letter-writing; future memoirs & bios will be very boring I fear). In the early 50s Nancy, a Francophile, adapted a French comedy, "The Little Hut," that ran for 3 years in London. The story of a husband who shares his wife with her lover when all are stranded on a tropical island, "Hut" dismayed Puritan theatre critics here when it transferred to Broadway. It only lasted a few weeks, but Eric Bentley was wise enough to appreciate its satiric take on sex. Mitford never visited the US. Ever. She believed most Americans were doltish and the Bwy reception confirmed her views. The producer begged her to attend the opening, sure that her Personality would burp-up-the-press. "He says I must go, everything paid," she wrote, "He speaks as if I would make all the difference--." She would have made a difference. The unique Mitford "voice" is present in everything she wrote, which included some travel pieces. On a '50s trip to Russia: "We shot into the air with the minimum of fuss -- no revving, no voice bossing about safety belts -- no safety belts either. But we never seemed to gain any height at all and it was, 'Oh, do mind that tree,' all the way to Moscow. So I was able to see the endless steppes very comfortably as from a train." On a visit to Rome she compared the Eternal City to a village, "with its one post office, one railway station and life centered round the vicarage." Romans were not amused. Author Harold Acton notes that in literature as in life laughter was the golden key to her heart. Published in the mid-70s, Acton's memoir is Rinso-White; he offends no one. If curious, you have to Google some names and then you come away convinced that Mitford didnt have much of a sex life; many of her closest attachments were into same-sex relations, including Acton himself. "I'm sure everything would be fine if we were married--" she wrote naively, referring to a pash for Hamish Erskine, a Bright Young Thing of 1930. Two decades, a failed social marriage and several best-sellers later, she realized, "One has only to know about other people's lives for one's own to seem completely perfect." Acton explores Mitford's friendship with Evelyn Waugh, the mischief-maker, "Auntie" Vi Trefusis, and Alvilde Lees-Milne, wife of childhood friend James Lees-Milne -- therein a cosy lavender marriage. The development of Mitford's work and the entire U and Non-U Game are discussed in pleasing detail. Also here are Mitford's final 3 years when she was slowly dying of a hideous cancer. When a fan suggested she see a faith healer, Nancy wrote a friend, "If I hadn't lost all sense of humor I should think it funny." Awarded the Legion d'Honneur (1972), she said it was the only honor she had ever wanted. She was then glued to her bed, "crunching pain killers."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hanneke

    The title on the cover page, stating that this is a biography of Nancy Mitford, is misleading, as this is cannot possibly be called a biography. It is a memoir and there is nothing wrong to call it that. The writer, her friend Harold Acton, was a very close confidente of Nancy. He quotes from the letters received from Nancy and his letters to her and from correspondence of other close friends in such an accomplished way that it almost feels like that Nancy wrote her own memoir. We get a very cle The title on the cover page, stating that this is a biography of Nancy Mitford, is misleading, as this is cannot possibly be called a biography. It is a memoir and there is nothing wrong to call it that. The writer, her friend Harold Acton, was a very close confidente of Nancy. He quotes from the letters received from Nancy and his letters to her and from correspondence of other close friends in such an accomplished way that it almost feels like that Nancy wrote her own memoir. We get a very clear look into her life from the direct quotes from her letters to her friends and vice versa. And that makes very interesting reading because she is a very witty woman and she does not shy away from bald judgements, often very funny and sharp. Unless you are, of course, the victim of her sharp tongue. I wondered what her friends thought about her remarks after the publication of this memoir! Harold Acton never even makes any allusion of why some of the Mitford sisters were notorious. He hardly ever mentions the other Mitford sisters in fact, only to tell how lovely they took care of Nancy in her final days. No mention of nazi sympathies of two sisters which shocked Brittain badly during WW-II, nor of the fact that her sister Diane was in prison during the war, together with her husband, the leader of the British Fascist Party. The fact that Acton avoids any troublesome issues and only mentions all the great events, travels and dinners in Nancy’s life, in short, all the fun she and her close friends were having, makes this book just a retrospection on good times shared. It is very interesting to read Nancy's ideas for new novels and of her extensive research for her historical novels. She always was nervous how her books would be received which shows her uncertainty about her general knowledge. One has to be aware that she never attended formal schools and was taught by governesses at home, as was the custom for girls of the highest class. Writing extensively every day to her friends, it was great fun to read all the gossipy news of that exalted world. As they said themselves, shrieking fun was often had by all and reported upon. Acton was a very affectionate friend and is very loving in describing the last years of Nancy when she suffered tremendously from agonizing pains, which morfine even could not relieve. All in all, I enjoyed to read Nancy’s witty letters and also those of her friends, especially those of the vicious Evelyn Waugh. Undoubtedly, all quite interesting people! I would not recommend this memoir to people who are not too familiar with the Mitford family though.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Beth Bonini

    I don’t think I’ve ever read two biographies on the same subject alongside each other. It just goes to show how a biographer’s choice of material, and attitude towards his/her subject, can shape the ‘story’ of a person’s life - and also, then, how the reader feels about the person. After reading Selina Hastings’ 1985 biography of Mitford I found myself disliking the author, and yet her eccentricities seemed endearing again when reading Acton’s version of her life. Harold Acton was a close friend I don’t think I’ve ever read two biographies on the same subject alongside each other. It just goes to show how a biographer’s choice of material, and attitude towards his/her subject, can shape the ‘story’ of a person’s life - and also, then, how the reader feels about the person. After reading Selina Hastings’ 1985 biography of Mitford I found myself disliking the author, and yet her eccentricities seemed endearing again when reading Acton’s version of her life. Harold Acton was a close friend of Nancy Mitford’s and his great affection for her is definitely the frame of this biography. Even when she is being outrageously opinionated, bigoted and snobby, he is an indulgent narrator - never a judgmental one. His own ‘reading’ of Mitford’s character is that, like her great friend Evelyn Waugh, she had ‘delicate and kind heart’ but a sharp tongue. Acton’s main role in this biography was to choose and organise from Mitford’s own voluminous correspondence to friends and family over the years. The book reads, at times, more like an epistolary memoir than an actual biography because Mitford’s letters are the majority if not the entirety of the book. Because Mitford’s letters were made up largely of references to shared acquaintance and shared jokes, and allusions to whatever project she was working on, they aren’t always terribly easy to follow. However, there is the advantage of feeling like you have direct access to her private voice and something of her fabled charm and distinctive thought processes. Although this was the first biography to be written about Mitford, I would recommend it only to those readers who already know the writer (and her work) fairly (if not very) well. It’s Advanced Mitford, so to speak.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Harold Acton and Nancy traveled in the same continental circles which they each grew into after the end of the Second World War - Nancy in Paris and Harold in Florence they have in common the total embrace of Europe not always natural to the English abroad, and so flow in a confluence of literary and aristocratic beau monde, but one that does not exclude large aesthetic and social-political sympathies. This Memoir was published just after her in 1973 and focuses on the years not chronicled in he Harold Acton and Nancy traveled in the same continental circles which they each grew into after the end of the Second World War - Nancy in Paris and Harold in Florence they have in common the total embrace of Europe not always natural to the English abroad, and so flow in a confluence of literary and aristocratic beau monde, but one that does not exclude large aesthetic and social-political sympathies. This Memoir was published just after her in 1973 and focuses on the years not chronicled in her biographically referenced novels. Harold's voice is a refined lilt that basically sews together the enormously pleasurable talk quoted from Nancy's many correspondences. Her humour is omnipresent and carries her through hapless love, war time work, writer's doubts, penny pinching, as well as humbles her through wild success, but humour's most audacious employ is in how she managed to keep mixing silly and deathly serious throughout four hellish years of physical agony leading up to her death - territory where even Harold is squeamish to go. Strikingly, what comes out of this, and might not have been present in the many other Mitford material, is Nancy's soldiering, explorer's spirit - her life long passion for a North Pole adventurist combines with her later biographical passions for history's military men - it's amazingly surprising to find that her idea of heaven is the rush of the calvary into battle! Another remarkable section are the tales from the London Bombings of the Blitz when she is driving a rescue van among the explosions, and for perhaps once not required to exaggerate a bit in letters to her Mother. This actioned spirit emerges to temper just a bit the Nancy lover of New Look Dior, escritoirs et chaise longues, hedgehogs, roses, nights spent in, Paris, Versailles, Venice and mock-conservativism. Nancy truly is love.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen-Leigh

    Very evocative biography. Nancy's voice is clear, the end of her life not presented in depressing sadness, her love life not presented as miserable. Harold and her letters show an upbeat, hardworking, intelligent, humorous woman who was loved and led a full life. I really enjoyed how this biography was written, a very individual style about a very individual one. Nancy Mitford was famous and deservedly so.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Davison

    An interesting look at the life and times of Nancy Mitford. Along the way I learnt that she was friends with other ‘bright young things’ on the London writing and social scene between the wars. She counted Evelyn Waugh and Cecil Beaton, Dior and Violet Trefusis among her friends. I found out that it was Nancy who came up with and was thereafter identified with the concept of "U" (upper) and "non-U" language, whereby social origins and standing were identified by words used in everyday speech. Ev An interesting look at the life and times of Nancy Mitford. Along the way I learnt that she was friends with other ‘bright young things’ on the London writing and social scene between the wars. She counted Evelyn Waugh and Cecil Beaton, Dior and Violet Trefusis among her friends. I found out that it was Nancy who came up with and was thereafter identified with the concept of "U" (upper) and "non-U" language, whereby social origins and standing were identified by words used in everyday speech. Evidently, as her letters to Acton showed, she had intended this whole U and non-U idea as a joke, but many took it seriously, and Mitford was considered an authority on manners and breeding—this is possibly her most lasting legacy. I have a couple of older friends who find the Mitford sisters and their odd ( reprehensible in the case of Unity) allegiances to Fascism and Hitler endlessly fascinating. At least now I’ve got a better understanding of one of the sisters. I’m not likely to rush out and read her novels just yet.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Annalisa

    I can't resist a book by or about Nancy Mitford, although this one did rather disappoint. The book was written by Harold Acton, a life-long friend of Mitford's. For someone new to Nancy Mitford, I expect this book would be a bit puzzling: Acton writes for those already "in-the-know" and I would have missed many of his references had I not already been familiar with the Mitford family. Nonetheless I enjoyed reading about Nancy from a friend's perspective. She still fascinates and entertains me wi I can't resist a book by or about Nancy Mitford, although this one did rather disappoint. The book was written by Harold Acton, a life-long friend of Mitford's. For someone new to Nancy Mitford, I expect this book would be a bit puzzling: Acton writes for those already "in-the-know" and I would have missed many of his references had I not already been familiar with the Mitford family. Nonetheless I enjoyed reading about Nancy from a friend's perspective. She still fascinates and entertains me with her wit. The verbal jousting between she and her father, her teases and tricks and desire to make fun of everything seem to have been a great influence on her family and all who knew her. This book also underlined the very particular skill she had at writing engagingly and with clarity on every topic she tackled. When her biography of Madame Pompadour came out in 1960, it was a top seller and people from all walks of life were reading it, in the soon to be swinging sixties no less. Next on my list are her last books, the biographies of Pompadour, Voltaire, Louis XIV the Sun King, and Frederick the Great.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I had trouble reading this book. Something about the style it was written in was not very compelling. Most of the text seemed to be taken from Nancy's letters and maybe that was the problem; I felt it was kind of choppy. Also, there were quite a few quotes or phrases in French and translations would have been helpful. (I can read French up to a certain point but I could only understand about half of what was said. I might have understood more but I didn't always want to sit there and laboriously I had trouble reading this book. Something about the style it was written in was not very compelling. Most of the text seemed to be taken from Nancy's letters and maybe that was the problem; I felt it was kind of choppy. Also, there were quite a few quotes or phrases in French and translations would have been helpful. (I can read French up to a certain point but I could only understand about half of what was said. I might have understood more but I didn't always want to sit there and laboriously translate it.) But otherwise, it was a loving potrait of who Nancy was. I'm sorry I couldn't get into it more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bryn (Plus Others)

    If you are only going to read a single biography of Nancy Mitford, this is not the one! That being said, yes, four stars because it was a very enjoyable read -- it is just that he pleasure is that of Mitford's own writing; Acton has built his book almost entirely from her letters, carefully chosen and strung together with a thin narrative thread that does just enough to place them in context and occasionally to share his own memories of her. Any biographer is creating a narrative of their subjec If you are only going to read a single biography of Nancy Mitford, this is not the one! That being said, yes, four stars because it was a very enjoyable read -- it is just that he pleasure is that of Mitford's own writing; Acton has built his book almost entirely from her letters, carefully chosen and strung together with a thin narrative thread that does just enough to place them in context and occasionally to share his own memories of her. Any biographer is creating a narrative of their subject, of course, but in this case Acton is not only constrained by his own relationship to Nancy, but by the fact that three of her sisters (Diana, Pam and Deborah) were heavily involved, and thus he was careful not to include any of the unpleasant family truths that might upset them -- so, for instance, while he notes in passing that Diana Mosley was imprisoned during WW2, he neglects to mention Nancy's role in making that happen, or how that impacted their relationship years later when Diana found out! He also ignores Jessica almost entirely; to read his book you would think Nancy has no relationship to her whatsoever, whereas in reality they exchanged letters on & off over the years. Possibly he did not have access to her share of Nancy's letters? I know that over the decades she refused to cooperate with projects that she felt would whitewash Diana's fascism, and this one certainly does. Regardless, I enjoyed getting to read so many more of Nancy's own words, and while I recognise that Acton's narrative of her life is hugely simplified and beautified, I appreciated hearing what it looked like to a contemporary and friend of hers. I am going on to the Selina Hastings biography next (Nancy Mitford: A Biography) and I am curious to see how they differ.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Interesting but disappointing I have long been a great fan of Nancy Mitford’s books, especially Love in a Cold Climate. This biography was based on her letters and while it gave interesting insight into her life, it was at times rambling and jumped about in time. There were also quite a lot of passages in French, which I do not speak or know well enough to understand, so a translation would have been useful. There were glimpses of the real Nancy, including some unsavoury traits such as racism, t Interesting but disappointing I have long been a great fan of Nancy Mitford’s books, especially Love in a Cold Climate. This biography was based on her letters and while it gave interesting insight into her life, it was at times rambling and jumped about in time. There were also quite a lot of passages in French, which I do not speak or know well enough to understand, so a translation would have been useful. There were glimpses of the real Nancy, including some unsavoury traits such as racism, towards the end of the book, but I do not feel that I knew her much better at the end than at the beginning.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alayne

    An interesting look at a time long gone; of upper class English people and the way they talked, lived etc. Certainly Nancy Mitford was a fascinating character, but there were things about her that I would not have liked. If you are interested in the author of Love in a Cold Climate and others, then this is recommended reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary Walsh

    Not quite amusing I am sure Nancy Mitford was a.darling but th is biographer doesn't really get that across. Not very enjoyable actually

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maureen S

    Scanned is more accurate - not much additional that I did not glean from her book of letters

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Vincent Nelson

    After reading other biographies about the Mitford sisters, I decided to delve into one about Nancy. Harold Acton's biography was the perfect place to start, as it glosses over her childhood and delves more fully into her grown-up life. Written from the perspective of one of her friends, Nancy's humor and vibrant personality truly shine through. Acton's portrayal of her allows the readers to see what attracted everyone from the Bright Young Things to literary types to older women to Nancy. The inc After reading other biographies about the Mitford sisters, I decided to delve into one about Nancy. Harold Acton's biography was the perfect place to start, as it glosses over her childhood and delves more fully into her grown-up life. Written from the perspective of one of her friends, Nancy's humor and vibrant personality truly shine through. Acton's portrayal of her allows the readers to see what attracted everyone from the Bright Young Things to literary types to older women to Nancy. The inclusion of so many excerpts from her letters to friends and sisters gives a glimpse into the teases, pain, and joys of the author as well as putting on plain display her amazing sense of humor and joy of life. Acton does as times delve into more personal commentary than is useful to understand Nancy, often describing her companions from his perspective. I found this at times a bit useless, but reading a book written with such affection for its subject was really refreshing at at times made me feel as thought I too was part of the social circle in which Nancy lived.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ella

    Towards the end of the book, Acton quotes Nancy Mitford's review of a biography: "I hardly could believe my eyes as I read it. It's scissors and paste in style, a long quotation in almost every paragraph. I found this so irritating..." This biography of Nancy Mitford is even worse for the 'scissors and paste' style, with Acton scarcely contributing more than the tag phrases which introduce each long extract from Mitford's letters. He offers little in the way of a frame or context for the letters Towards the end of the book, Acton quotes Nancy Mitford's review of a biography: "I hardly could believe my eyes as I read it. It's scissors and paste in style, a long quotation in almost every paragraph. I found this so irritating..." This biography of Nancy Mitford is even worse for the 'scissors and paste' style, with Acton scarcely contributing more than the tag phrases which introduce each long extract from Mitford's letters. He offers little in the way of a frame or context for the letters, and includes hundreds of little asides - his and Mitford's - about a cast of friends and acquaintances that are never properly introduced or distinguished from one another. It's a shame, because so many of the letters are a pleasure to read - funny and gossipy and interested - and give a strong sense of what Nancy Mitford was like in real life, and as a friend. The gossiping about Violet Trefusis was a highlight, and some of what the book loses in clarity is won back with Acton's evident affection for his subject.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David

    This book is probably only for the truly Mitford-obsessed (=me). One of Nancy Mitford's closest friends quotes extensively from her correspondence to create a portrait of his friend. Despite my obsession, I found the book slow going at first, and nearly gave up. Glad I stuck with it, because it did get much more interesting as it went on. Some of the stuff about her biography of Frederick the Great was particularly amusing. Her attempt to understand his homosexuality was interesting in its matte This book is probably only for the truly Mitford-obsessed (=me). One of Nancy Mitford's closest friends quotes extensively from her correspondence to create a portrait of his friend. Despite my obsession, I found the book slow going at first, and nearly gave up. Glad I stuck with it, because it did get much more interesting as it went on. Some of the stuff about her biography of Frederick the Great was particularly amusing. Her attempt to understand his homosexuality was interesting in its matter-of-fact approach, and the report of her visits to key historic sites in the then-communist East Germany and Czechoslovakia were fascinating. The crazy sense of humor is of course the main pleasure, and there was plenty of that, too. But I don't think I can call it a good read. Still, I am now curious about this author, and will add some of his work to my To-Read list.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Harold Acton's memoir of Nancy Mitford is a wonderfully personal remembrance of Mitford by one of her oldest friends. Acton worked from scads of her delightfully chatty letters and quotes liberally from them, so that it's as if Nancy herself wrote the memoir (which may have been partially Acton's aim, as she died before she could complete her autobiography). It's not nearly as complete a biography as those by Selina Hastings or Laura Thompson, but the quotations and personal anecdotes make it es Harold Acton's memoir of Nancy Mitford is a wonderfully personal remembrance of Mitford by one of her oldest friends. Acton worked from scads of her delightfully chatty letters and quotes liberally from them, so that it's as if Nancy herself wrote the memoir (which may have been partially Acton's aim, as she died before she could complete her autobiography). It's not nearly as complete a biography as those by Selina Hastings or Laura Thompson, but the quotations and personal anecdotes make it essential reading for Mitford fans.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Mader

    Interesting seeing Mitford's life through Acton's eyes as well as her letters, but Acton doesn't seem very adept at weaving in his own point of view. Whenever he is talking about his own life or giving his own impressions, the writing seems awkward. Also it's oddly, and jerkily, repetitive--a line in one paragraph is repeated not-quite word-for-word a few paragraphs later. Also he skated over certain areas of her life, sometimes coming up with kind reasons instead of actual ones. I understand the Interesting seeing Mitford's life through Acton's eyes as well as her letters, but Acton doesn't seem very adept at weaving in his own point of view. Whenever he is talking about his own life or giving his own impressions, the writing seems awkward. Also it's oddly, and jerkily, repetitive--a line in one paragraph is repeated not-quite word-for-word a few paragraphs later. Also he skated over certain areas of her life, sometimes coming up with kind reasons instead of actual ones. I understand the intent, just noting it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Gaskell

    I had a mixed response to this. Some of it zipped along, whilst other sections seemed to get bogged down with too much detail and I found myself skipping bits. Much of the text is drawn from her correspondence with families and friends so it is almost the memoirs she never got round to starting. It would have been helpful to have translations of the French sentences for those of us who can do little more than say hello and goodbye!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor

    I did enjoy this. Harold Acton uses a large amount of quotes from Nancy's letters to her friends and family, and because of this you can really "hear" her voice throughout, she really comes alive. But I think the way they were used was slightly difficult - perhaps having quotes indented would have made it a lot easier to read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Val

    Nancy intended to write a memoir of her life in France after WWII. Harold Acton has tried to do it for her, using her own words as much as possible. He quotes extensively from her letters, adds commentary, anecdotes, reminiscences from her friends and relatives and factual details. Nancy's distinct voice speaks through her letters.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katriona

    An insight into the mind of Nancy Mitford. The writer was a bit pompous at times and some of Nancy's opinions shocked & bothered me, but it was interesting and hilarious at times, the rhythm of her writing and phrases becoming familiar. An insight into the mind of Nancy Mitford. The writer was a bit pompous at times and some of Nancy's opinions shocked & bothered me, but it was interesting and hilarious at times, the rhythm of her writing and phrases becoming familiar.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gill

    The ability of the Mitford sisters to carry on a friendship through letters always amazes me. I wish I had the ability... Witty, caustic and occasionally controversial, Nancy Mitford's life was so unlike my own that it's a pleasure to look into another world..

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jaylia3

    Nancy wanted to write her own memoir but she got too sick. This book by her friend Harold Acton treats her more lovingly than her other biographies, and it has his detailed personal memories and insights that only someone close to her could include.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard Thomas

    An affectionate biography of Nancy Mitford who was not as nice as she looked

  26. 4 out of 5

    Libby Webdale

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robin Rose

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lachlan Watt

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Pasifull

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