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The Gentle Art Of Domesticity

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Jane Brocket delights in domesticity. Lively, curious, and creative, she takes inspiration from her surroundings, from art, literature, and nature, and expresses her passion through the gentle arts of needlework, cooking, gardening, and homemaking—and now through her writing. In The Gentle Art of Domesticity Brocket celebrates everything that is, and can be, wonderful abou Jane Brocket delights in domesticity. Lively, curious, and creative, she takes inspiration from her surroundings, from art, literature, and nature, and expresses her passion through the gentle arts of needlework, cooking, gardening, and homemaking—and now through her writing. In The Gentle Art of Domesticity Brocket celebrates everything that is, and can be, wonderful about home life. This gorgeous and unusual book, full of whimsy, warmth, and a wealth of stunning photographs, helps us to see domesticity with new eyes. Whether she’s knitting a tea cozy or baking jam tarts, crocheting a blanket or sewing an apron, Brocket fills her home with beauty, color, and fun. She transforms day-to-day domesticity into a realm of possibilities, both practical and imaginative—and encourages us to do the same in our own lives.Rather than categorize readers as quilters or embroiderers, bakers or gardeners, Brocket embraces the idea that they may be all of these, and more. The key to practicing any of the domestic arts, she says, is to recognize the value of homemaking, overlooked skills, and ordinary things. This book’s glorious synthesis of style, DIY projects, and philosophical musings inspires us not only to emulate Brocket’s handmade creations but also to share her enjoyment of the simple pleasures of home.


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Jane Brocket delights in domesticity. Lively, curious, and creative, she takes inspiration from her surroundings, from art, literature, and nature, and expresses her passion through the gentle arts of needlework, cooking, gardening, and homemaking—and now through her writing. In The Gentle Art of Domesticity Brocket celebrates everything that is, and can be, wonderful abou Jane Brocket delights in domesticity. Lively, curious, and creative, she takes inspiration from her surroundings, from art, literature, and nature, and expresses her passion through the gentle arts of needlework, cooking, gardening, and homemaking—and now through her writing. In The Gentle Art of Domesticity Brocket celebrates everything that is, and can be, wonderful about home life. This gorgeous and unusual book, full of whimsy, warmth, and a wealth of stunning photographs, helps us to see domesticity with new eyes. Whether she’s knitting a tea cozy or baking jam tarts, crocheting a blanket or sewing an apron, Brocket fills her home with beauty, color, and fun. She transforms day-to-day domesticity into a realm of possibilities, both practical and imaginative—and encourages us to do the same in our own lives.Rather than categorize readers as quilters or embroiderers, bakers or gardeners, Brocket embraces the idea that they may be all of these, and more. The key to practicing any of the domestic arts, she says, is to recognize the value of homemaking, overlooked skills, and ordinary things. This book’s glorious synthesis of style, DIY projects, and philosophical musings inspires us not only to emulate Brocket’s handmade creations but also to share her enjoyment of the simple pleasures of home.

30 review for The Gentle Art Of Domesticity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    How do I loathe this "book"? Let me count the ways: 1) Faux Book It takes more than a cover and pages to make a book. This appears to be a printout of blogposts, without the interactivity of an actual blog and without the structure of an actual book. While there is a table of contents, and there are "chapters," this "book" has no real bones to it. There's no thesis the author develops and the chapters are thrown together. 2) Faux Feminism Convincing your husband to do the "domesticated" tasks of, s How do I loathe this "book"? Let me count the ways: 1) Faux Book It takes more than a cover and pages to make a book. This appears to be a printout of blogposts, without the interactivity of an actual blog and without the structure of an actual book. While there is a table of contents, and there are "chapters," this "book" has no real bones to it. There's no thesis the author develops and the chapters are thrown together. 2) Faux Feminism Convincing your husband to do the "domesticated" tasks of, say, making an actual meal while you decorate cupcakes with blue icing and gummy sharks is not feminism. It demeans the work of the home, and the (mostly women) who do it, to even suggest such a thing. This sentence alone makes me want to throttle the "author": [At my "fiercely academic girls' school":] No heed was paid to the fact that we were all women, most of us likely to have relationships with the opposite sex and make babies, and inhabit a domestic space of some sort." Excuse me, but anyone who is not homeless and does not inhabit a hotel inhabits a domestic space. Homes are not the exclusive purview of heterosexuals, couples, parents, or women. 3) Faux Crafting No technique. A few scattered recipes, none for anything useful. No contribution to practical knowledge here, folks. Move on, there's nothing to see. 4) Faux Design Illegible font for chapter headings and tiny gray print overcome any charm that the pretty photos might have. 5) Dashed Expectations This one is at least partly my fault. I waited eagerly for it on hold at the library, suffering through the holiday shutdown knowing that it was held captive until the reopening. But to entitle something "The Gentle Art of Domesticity..." is to make some claim that you have something to say about the subject, either a scholarly contribution about the role of crafting or a contribution to crafting lore itself. This book should have been entitled, "Jane Brocket loves Tea Cosies and Gummy Sharks (and Cary Grant and Ribbon)." Random personal musings may be blog fodder, but something more ought to be required of a book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heide

    An enormous, thoughtful, beautiful book, perfect for anyone with any leanings at all toward domesticity. Makes me yearn to spend my days reading Jane Eyre, baking bread and growing tomatos. This book makes me realize how many small simple ways there are to make my home life more special. I got my copy from Amazon UK (they have international shipping), not sure if it's available in the US yet. An enormous, thoughtful, beautiful book, perfect for anyone with any leanings at all toward domesticity. Makes me yearn to spend my days reading Jane Eyre, baking bread and growing tomatos. This book makes me realize how many small simple ways there are to make my home life more special. I got my copy from Amazon UK (they have international shipping), not sure if it's available in the US yet.

  3. 4 out of 5

    JayeL

    I bought this book after reading several critical reviews. I bought it because I love the photos and words on Brocket's blog. It is totally worth the price even if you never read the text. I have devoured all of the pictures and slowly made my way through the text. Brocket is an excellent and thoughtful writer. There are so many good thoughts that the photos offer a welcome diversion to some of the text. Not in a bad way, but in a way that allows me to process the words. The photos are similar to I bought this book after reading several critical reviews. I bought it because I love the photos and words on Brocket's blog. It is totally worth the price even if you never read the text. I have devoured all of the pictures and slowly made my way through the text. Brocket is an excellent and thoughtful writer. There are so many good thoughts that the photos offer a welcome diversion to some of the text. Not in a bad way, but in a way that allows me to process the words. The photos are similar to the photos on Jane's blog, Yarnstorm, in style and color choice. They are a luscious feast of flowers, fabrics and fairy buns. Of course there are yarns, needles and plants to round out the domesticity. If you want to make the quilts, the patterns she uses are all about the fabrics and the colors. The patterns are simple enough to figure out just from looking at the pictures. The knitting and crochet patterns are well documented and referenced in the back of the book. She does give many recipes for her culinary inspiration. I know now why publisher's like C&T have moved away from the Art and Inspiration series: people only want patterns. Why? I don't know since people mostly don't make the projects anyway. Most of the reviews were critical of the fact that there were no patterns in the book. Even someone whose opinion I valued devalued the book, because there were no patterns. Sigh! While I wanted to see some of the patterns after reading about them, frankly, I am glad there are no patterns. I want inspiration and not patterns. I can't believe a gorgeous, feast for the eyes book like this could be devalued by intelligent, capable women because there are no patterns. Patterns are overrated. I can see Jane following up on The Gentle Art of Domesticity with a "Patterns of the Gentle Art of Domesticity," even if the patterns to which she refers are very well documented in the bibliography. You should buy this book for its color and inspiration alone. Formerly thoughtful publishers have gone down the path of cookie cutter quilt books where there is a page of text, then pattern after pattern with little to no text on why the artist made the quilt or where the inspiration came from. There are already plenty of patterns in the world, let's beef up the inspiration side of things. Hopefully, this book will be the beginning of a trend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gina House

    Only 2 books in my life have been put on the "LIFE BIBLE" shelf...not to have anything to do with religion, but because these books have changed my life in a great way somehow. This book is one of them. I savored every page, waiting for a time before bed when I could sip a cup of tea, snuggle under the sheets and read each page slowly and carefully. It not only inspired me, but brought me joy, laughter and a feeling of "yes, this is me". Truly, truly a remarkable and extremely enjoyable book. LO Only 2 books in my life have been put on the "LIFE BIBLE" shelf...not to have anything to do with religion, but because these books have changed my life in a great way somehow. This book is one of them. I savored every page, waiting for a time before bed when I could sip a cup of tea, snuggle under the sheets and read each page slowly and carefully. It not only inspired me, but brought me joy, laughter and a feeling of "yes, this is me". Truly, truly a remarkable and extremely enjoyable book. LOVED IT!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Beth666ann

    Jane Brocket (she does the yarnstorm blog) is interested in ways that everyday life/domesticity can be made meaningful and beautiful. I support that project. The worst way to look at this book = rich woman who does not have to work spends far too much time playing with food color and writing poetically about cupcakes and paintings. A more charitable interpretation would include her thoughtful discussions of the value of making things, valuing one's living space and the way it looks/feels. At its Jane Brocket (she does the yarnstorm blog) is interested in ways that everyday life/domesticity can be made meaningful and beautiful. I support that project. The worst way to look at this book = rich woman who does not have to work spends far too much time playing with food color and writing poetically about cupcakes and paintings. A more charitable interpretation would include her thoughtful discussions of the value of making things, valuing one's living space and the way it looks/feels. At its worst, this book promotes insularity and is class-blind; at its best, it promotes an interesting sort of inwardness and thoughtfulness about the materials of everyday life. I felt both things at the same time while reading the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Roberts

    This book is beautiful! You do have to love color, yarn, quilts and looking at neon-colored cupcakes, though. The writing is average, something many people might write in their diary. However, there is so much inspiration in here to remember the "gentle arts" that (mostly) women have performed though the centuries. It reminds us that in this overly technological wordl, we can still enjoy simple earthy pleasures together. Check out the pumpkin tea cosy! This book is beautiful! You do have to love color, yarn, quilts and looking at neon-colored cupcakes, though. The writing is average, something many people might write in their diary. However, there is so much inspiration in here to remember the "gentle arts" that (mostly) women have performed though the centuries. It reminds us that in this overly technological wordl, we can still enjoy simple earthy pleasures together. Check out the pumpkin tea cosy!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Pritchard

    Although the book is “pretty,” and beautifully illustrated, I admit to being annoyed by the trend in this new generation of books that glorify domesticity. These are women of means who apparently spend their days relishing their roles. I was a stay-at-home mom, so I am not denigrating that. I am just annoyed by the author’s gushy tone about giving up her previous career. Hope she still feels the magic at menopause. That said, a couple nice recipes, and pretty things all in a row.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bianca

    Here are delicious photography, if over-sweet, and prose as familiar and comfortable as chocolate milk. Then, as I read, I started to wonder if the milk had gone off, because, well, I couldn't say why. On "the domestic library," she writes, "As I get older, I find I am happier to reread rather than spend (waste?) time with unknown and possibly disappointing books." Is that, I wonder, encouragement to enjoy another kind of pleasure or acknowledgement of an atrophied sense of adventure? She notes Here are delicious photography, if over-sweet, and prose as familiar and comfortable as chocolate milk. Then, as I read, I started to wonder if the milk had gone off, because, well, I couldn't say why. On "the domestic library," she writes, "As I get older, I find I am happier to reread rather than spend (waste?) time with unknown and possibly disappointing books." Is that, I wonder, encouragement to enjoy another kind of pleasure or acknowledgement of an atrophied sense of adventure? She notes that at her "fiercely academic girls' school...No heed was paid to the fact that we were all women, most of us likely to have relationships with the opposite sex and make babies, and inhabit a domestic space of some sort." What kind of institutional action would one have a school take in support of their students' future personal lives? However one would answer those questions, she feels strongly "that the feminists of the 1970s were misguided when they thought that teaching young girls to devalue domesticity constituted progress." Weren't the feminists the ones who noticed that the culture placed a low value on domestic arts, perhaps because, as she notes, "they don't require complicated skills, qualifications, training or equipment?" Nonetheless, she provides us with her vitae, as it wouldn't do for us to think her dumb, along with the lovely photos, tempting recipes and enviable crafts.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I was rather disappointed by this book. I expected it to be something of a celebration of the beauty of home, but found it was very half-hearted in that. As long as something is inherently decorative and largely purposeless, Jane Brockett approves of it (for example, embroidery and making ridiculously over-decorated cakes). But she is very scathing and derisory about most of what I would term domestic arts, and regards things that are generally useful (for example, cooking dinners as opposed to I was rather disappointed by this book. I expected it to be something of a celebration of the beauty of home, but found it was very half-hearted in that. As long as something is inherently decorative and largely purposeless, Jane Brockett approves of it (for example, embroidery and making ridiculously over-decorated cakes). But she is very scathing and derisory about most of what I would term domestic arts, and regards things that are generally useful (for example, cooking dinners as opposed to cakes, maintaining a level of cleanliness and tidiness in the home) as beneath her (and any other woman). Despite pretending to overthrow the tyrannies of feminism that forbid a woman to enjoy homemaking, in effect it just compounds them by denigrating almost all aspects of that. She only really has time for things that happen to be done at home but she feels are more "artistic" than important. However, the photography is beautiful, and if you can get past the patronising and pompous writing style there are some gems of information tucked in among the clutter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Though I skimmed this, I did look at every picture and read some of the text as it piqued my interest. I'm glad I paged carefully, because the spread on pp 220-221 shows exactly what I did with my three sons each respectively, to give them homemade quilts from scraps. We used top sheets (unused because we sleep with duvets) for the back, and boughten batting for the middle. And yarn ties to reinforce each corner. And now I've given you more specific and helpful information that Jane did througho Though I skimmed this, I did look at every picture and read some of the text as it piqued my interest. I'm glad I paged carefully, because the spread on pp 220-221 shows exactly what I did with my three sons each respectively, to give them homemade quilts from scraps. We used top sheets (unused because we sleep with duvets) for the back, and boughten batting for the middle. And yarn ties to reinforce each corner. And now I've given you more specific and helpful information that Jane did throughout almost all of this book. Most of the time if I liked what I saw in a picture, I could not find what I wanted to learn about it in the text. Frustrating. Interesting application of light. Is Berkshire the sunniest spot on England's island? But if so, why does Jane want *so *much* color in quilts, aprons, cupcakes, décor pillows, serving ware, etc. etc.? It does make for a very pretty book. Just not, imo, a very helpful one. tagged as dnf March 2021

  11. 5 out of 5

    C.A.

    Before I get started, the author kind of looked like Marie- only Marie is prettier and not an idiot. Okay. I was so excited for this book to only find out that it was just a random mismatch of very unimportant information! Want to know what movies this author likes but have no importance to your life at all? Read this book! Want to look at somewhat cute cakes and kind of pretty knitted projects but not have a pattern/ recipe to learn how to make them? Read this book! It was kind of like a really Before I get started, the author kind of looked like Marie- only Marie is prettier and not an idiot. Okay. I was so excited for this book to only find out that it was just a random mismatch of very unimportant information! Want to know what movies this author likes but have no importance to your life at all? Read this book! Want to look at somewhat cute cakes and kind of pretty knitted projects but not have a pattern/ recipe to learn how to make them? Read this book! It was kind of like a really bad adult picture book. But hot damn, you will know all about the interesting life of the author and kids. Also kind of like a bad blog only on static paper form. Oh and did she tell you she was a master of all wine? Last and most important- EVERY SINGLE ONE OF HER QUILTS WERE HIDEOUS!!!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I didn't even make it past pg 15. I felt like I was reading slightly pretentious essays. I might not even mind reading slightly pretentious essays if they were at all inspiring, interesting, or thought provoking. But reading someone's (not so interesting) journal, that isn't especially entertaining or inspiring? No thanks. I also didn't like how it jumped from one idea to another so quickly, although retrospectively I'm thinking it might be good bathroom reading. I guess if I owned the book I'd I didn't even make it past pg 15. I felt like I was reading slightly pretentious essays. I might not even mind reading slightly pretentious essays if they were at all inspiring, interesting, or thought provoking. But reading someone's (not so interesting) journal, that isn't especially entertaining or inspiring? No thanks. I also didn't like how it jumped from one idea to another so quickly, although retrospectively I'm thinking it might be good bathroom reading. I guess if I owned the book I'd keep it in the john, but since it's a library book I'm just going to return it. I also got a non-thrifty vibe from the book too. I'm not down with not being thrifty.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan C Lance

    Some books in the library you pick up and put down...interesting but not enough to check out. Some books you check out from the library and return. That was nice. I enjoyed that book. Some books you bring home and ...wait... this one is different. I need this one. This one has things in it that I will come back to and enjoy and use, such as lists or recipes. This book is the last of the three. I smiled as I looked at the wonderful photographs. I wanted to copy down all the lists she had of favorite Some books in the library you pick up and put down...interesting but not enough to check out. Some books you check out from the library and return. That was nice. I enjoyed that book. Some books you bring home and ...wait... this one is different. I need this one. This one has things in it that I will come back to and enjoy and use, such as lists or recipes. This book is the last of the three. I smiled as I looked at the wonderful photographs. I wanted to copy down all the lists she had of favorite art or movies or books. Because this is difficult to find in a bookstore, I would recommend going to your local library. Check it out and see what you think!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    Just picked this up on Valentines day whilst roaming the isles of B&N waiting for my kids to go to sleep. I love books/people/blogs/anything that elevates the art of domesticity. It's a fine line between sheer drudgery and taking pleasure in building your nest. Books like this one inspire and remind me to enjoy the journey. Also, she involves her kids in so many of the things she does. I am trying to be better at that. Just picked this up on Valentines day whilst roaming the isles of B&N waiting for my kids to go to sleep. I love books/people/blogs/anything that elevates the art of domesticity. It's a fine line between sheer drudgery and taking pleasure in building your nest. Books like this one inspire and remind me to enjoy the journey. Also, she involves her kids in so many of the things she does. I am trying to be better at that.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily Briano

    This is such a delightful book. Brocket is a talented and engaging writer, and obviously a talented domestician. This is a book you actually want to *read* instead of just looking at the (adorable) pictures. I love how the topics are divided up, making the path to domesticity an achievable and enjoyable one. A must for anyone who enjoys the home arts. A wonderful source for books, movies, and travel ideas as well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Willis Anderson

    LOTS in this book and a must for any crafter or person who enjoys the comforts of home. I picked it up at the library today and will enjoy pouring over it the next three weeks while I have it checked out but think I need to have my own copy. There is so much in it to embrace the wonderfulness of home and the comforts of the soul in it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Relyn

    I completely loved this book. How, oh how, did I ever miss reviewing it. I find that when too much time has passed and I really loved a book, I don't have much to say about it. Let me just try to summarize with this. I AM NOT crafty. Not talented AT ALL with my hands. Yet, here she goes getting me all excited about and interested in trying all sorts of crafty pursuits. Thank you, Jane. I completely loved this book. How, oh how, did I ever miss reviewing it. I find that when too much time has passed and I really loved a book, I don't have much to say about it. Let me just try to summarize with this. I AM NOT crafty. Not talented AT ALL with my hands. Yet, here she goes getting me all excited about and interested in trying all sorts of crafty pursuits. Thank you, Jane.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Nice Pictures, intended more for inspiration than instruction, therefore inherently disappointing. I did get a little sick of pictures of color coordinated cupcakes. Am I just jealous? Do I want to stay home wearing birkinstocks (color coordinated) and baking cupcakes in a home-made apron? Knitting up a tea cozy while they bake? It's possible Nice Pictures, intended more for inspiration than instruction, therefore inherently disappointing. I did get a little sick of pictures of color coordinated cupcakes. Am I just jealous? Do I want to stay home wearing birkinstocks (color coordinated) and baking cupcakes in a home-made apron? Knitting up a tea cozy while they bake? It's possible

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Chew

    I love this book. I have read it cover to cover, but the joy for me is just picking it up and reading bits here and there, and looking at the pictures. I want to live in this book, knitting and baking and eating rock buns with tea.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dena

    I want to quilt...This book is a terrible indulgence; it's impossible to do anything but bake or desire better sewing/knitting skills. I both like and loathe the lack of patterns. I want to quilt...This book is a terrible indulgence; it's impossible to do anything but bake or desire better sewing/knitting skills. I both like and loathe the lack of patterns.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Brilliant, just Brilliant. I wish I had an iota of Jane Brocket's creativity. This is a lovely, dreamy book, perfect for a lazy day with a cup of tea. Brilliant, just Brilliant. I wish I had an iota of Jane Brocket's creativity. This is a lovely, dreamy book, perfect for a lazy day with a cup of tea.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Missyk

    Read this book slowly; savor it. It's really lovely. Read this book slowly; savor it. It's really lovely.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Haka

    okay, so as far as i know, this is a collection of this lady’s successful blog posts- already and obsolete thing. i just... i am just so confused as to why this book exists. i don’t think it’s an instructional guide- because she’s totally unqualified and reminds the reader throughout that she’s just doing the “domestic thing” by her own whimsy and twee “inspirations.” apparently, this RANDOM affluent lady felt the need to demonstrate how one simply indulges in the creative domestic arts, as if p okay, so as far as i know, this is a collection of this lady’s successful blog posts- already and obsolete thing. i just... i am just so confused as to why this book exists. i don’t think it’s an instructional guide- because she’s totally unqualified and reminds the reader throughout that she’s just doing the “domestic thing” by her own whimsy and twee “inspirations.” apparently, this RANDOM affluent lady felt the need to demonstrate how one simply indulges in the creative domestic arts, as if people are too afraid to do it or have some misguided concept of feminism that would make a woman hate knitting, but like, who is AGAINST the domestic ARTS?! if ANYONE views domesticity as a way to control and repress women-then absolutely, there’s room for resistance, but this lady is celebrating domesticity in a way that ANYONE could find appealing and romantic. she appears to have an endless amount of time and money to galavant around to buy high quality materials to make obnoxious quilts and bakes all day. for someone who embraces “domesticity,” she has the privilege to pick and choose which parts of domesticity that “pleases” her- she appears to dump the unsexy, menial domestic work of cleaning or garden upkeep on her old man in a dismissive way while she spends the day in art galleries or big international cities for “inspiration.” she is the definition of one of those types who has never been told to “stfu.” She’s a twee, self-indulgent middle age lady more hell bent to prove to herself (above all else) that she’s happy to stay at home and knit dreadful tea cozies, and you should too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Bennett

    This was a reread. I bought this book in Birmingham twelve years ago. Mine is actually the hardback edition with this cover, but that's not on goodreads. I went to Birmingham to go wedding dress shopping with my best friend and didn't go into any wedding dress shops and spent £80 on books. I adore this book. For those who are pompously claiming she isn't a feminist, they are overlooking the fact that her blog and the writing of this book (and then seventeen others) were her job. Yes, she's marri This was a reread. I bought this book in Birmingham twelve years ago. Mine is actually the hardback edition with this cover, but that's not on goodreads. I went to Birmingham to go wedding dress shopping with my best friend and didn't go into any wedding dress shops and spent £80 on books. I adore this book. For those who are pompously claiming she isn't a feminist, they are overlooking the fact that her blog and the writing of this book (and then seventeen others) were her job. Yes, she's married with kids and enjoys knitting, but if a man did all those things, would we say he couldn't be a feminist? Feminism is supposed to be about freedom, not new rules about the "right" way to live your life. She is also obsessed with railways and vegetable growing and has taught her son how to quilt. What this book is, is an encyclopedia of finding joy in small things, in enjoying homely pleasures. Brockett loves what she writes about and I love reading books packed with enthusiasm. She has a glorious flair with colour. Yes, she's more wealthy than me, but I could recreate many of her small joys just by hunting in charity shops for materials. My favourite thing about this book is how it makes me feel. I feel cosy and excited when reading it. A wonderful smush of orange and pink emotion that shouldn't go together, but it does.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Linebarger

    I read this book for the first time when it was first available in the U.S., probably seven or eight years ago. I remember spending hours with it, sitting on my front porch, through the warmer weather months, and I remember liking it. I pulled it off the shelf this year for a second reading, and it did not disappoint! The book explores all aspects of household life, from a distinctly feminine point of view, and explores the artful side of homemaking, referring to the disciplines involved as "dom I read this book for the first time when it was first available in the U.S., probably seven or eight years ago. I remember spending hours with it, sitting on my front porch, through the warmer weather months, and I remember liking it. I pulled it off the shelf this year for a second reading, and it did not disappoint! The book explores all aspects of household life, from a distinctly feminine point of view, and explores the artful side of homemaking, referring to the disciplines involved as "domestic arts". The photography, mostly done by the author, is gorgeous, and the turn of every page includes full color photos opposite the text. The book is, itself, a lovely read, exploring things that inspire the domestic artist, including movie and book recommendations (Cary Grant!!), nature, fine art, and more. As a woman who enjoys knitting and quilting (though I'm a novice at both), the author reminds me that I'm not necessarily knitting or quilting for perfection, but rather to have beautiful things, made by me, for my home and family, and for the satisfaction that comes from the making it with my own hands.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I like Brocket’s sense of color very much and I immediately started following her on Instagram. This is a highly episodic volume, probably a compilation of blog posts. It probably works better as a blog. I don’t love the book: possibly because the term “domesticity“ makes me feel rather feral despite her apologia on its behalf, but also I think her vision is not inspirational.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This book wasn't what I thought it was going to be. I don't doubt that it could be inspirational to people, but it doesn't really give you much help on how to create projects exactly. This review is also posted on the LibraryThing website. This book wasn't what I thought it was going to be. I don't doubt that it could be inspirational to people, but it doesn't really give you much help on how to create projects exactly. This review is also posted on the LibraryThing website.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    Adorable reminders of how the simple things make all the difference.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    Pretty book but it is largely yarn yarn yarn crafts which I don't have an interest in. If you knit, then this is your book. Pretty book but it is largely yarn yarn yarn crafts which I don't have an interest in. If you knit, then this is your book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Mckague

    Beautiful pictures but otherwise lacks substance. Reviews presented as almost a "how-to", sorely disappointed for this reason. Beautiful pictures but otherwise lacks substance. Reviews presented as almost a "how-to", sorely disappointed for this reason.

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