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Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven

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by Barbara J. Patterson, Pamela Bradley and Jean Riordan (Perfect Paperback - Jan 1, 2000)


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by Barbara J. Patterson, Pamela Bradley and Jean Riordan (Perfect Paperback - Jan 1, 2000)

30 review for Beyond the Rainbow Bridge: Nurturing Our Children from Birth to Seven

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

    (edited) My family is not exactly a "Waldorf Family," however, we do appreciate the Waldorf style and philosophy. (And I have long since learned that I do not have to subscribe to any philosophy wholly in order to borrow from it). But this book really brought to light a lot of what the Waldorf philosophy rides on for young children and gave me ideas for bringing that into my own parenting. My children are a bit old for this book's teachings, though. I'd say that it's best for parents of infants u (edited) My family is not exactly a "Waldorf Family," however, we do appreciate the Waldorf style and philosophy. (And I have long since learned that I do not have to subscribe to any philosophy wholly in order to borrow from it). But this book really brought to light a lot of what the Waldorf philosophy rides on for young children and gave me ideas for bringing that into my own parenting. My children are a bit old for this book's teachings, though. I'd say that it's best for parents of infants up to age 5. What is great about this book is the parent questions at the end of each chapter. This really helps a skeptic, I think, digest the book instead of holding it at arms length and dismissing the whole thing. Another great aspect is the songs and craft instructions for making simple Waldorf toys. But, by far, the biggest gem for me in the whole book is the magic word "may". Once I started using that with my children ("You may put your dishes away." "You may hang up your coat."), I was converted! Wow! It works! If you want to understand, you may read this book. :) I believe that this book is a huge help in enjoying my children more and raising future children in a more gentle way.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ardra

    Great intro to Waldorf early education. Really loved the ideas presented in this book. It has changed how I view simple tasks such as sweeping the floor, baking with Ethan, etc. Now instead of seeing it as a chore (that's a PIA), I look at it as a calming activity that doesn't need to be rushed, keeping in mind that my children are absorbing my attitude. The old fashioned way of life (the daily rituals--Monday is wash day, Tuesday is ironing day, Wednesday is baking day, etc) was very comforting Great intro to Waldorf early education. Really loved the ideas presented in this book. It has changed how I view simple tasks such as sweeping the floor, baking with Ethan, etc. Now instead of seeing it as a chore (that's a PIA), I look at it as a calming activity that doesn't need to be rushed, keeping in mind that my children are absorbing my attitude. The old fashioned way of life (the daily rituals--Monday is wash day, Tuesday is ironing day, Wednesday is baking day, etc) was very comforting for children. We wouldn't want to give up our modern conveniences but we can still recreate some of these rhythms. Also it really sold me on the idea of gentle discipline so that our children don't build up protective walls that we can't penetrate. (Easier said than done--I'm trying out singing a song as I get Ethan to do what I want him to do--helps to keep me calm anyway!) It inspired me to read a lot more about Waldorf education. Ultimately I decided that pursuing the K-12 school is not for us since I question the anthroposophic ideas it is based on. However for preschool I could not be happier, and I see Ethan absolutely thriving under the loving care of his teacher (who loaned me this book.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    In trying to learn about Waldorf early childhood education, I read most of this book, very quickly. It's super easy to read, and the mystery of Waldorf is fading, finally. An awkward relationship to the belief system behind Waldorf has replaced my intrigue. The "science" of anthroposophy feels too much like faith, and faith would be fine, if it wasn't called science. This is not much of a review of this book, but this book led me here: It will be, for me, a tradition to borrow from, with lots of In trying to learn about Waldorf early childhood education, I read most of this book, very quickly. It's super easy to read, and the mystery of Waldorf is fading, finally. An awkward relationship to the belief system behind Waldorf has replaced my intrigue. The "science" of anthroposophy feels too much like faith, and faith would be fine, if it wasn't called science. This is not much of a review of this book, but this book led me here: It will be, for me, a tradition to borrow from, with lots of good ideas, particularly with regard to how to adjust my own behavior for the benefit of my child's imitation. I've started doing more work around her, cleaning and such, tidying her things when she gets fussy. And maybe one less-cynical day, I'll believe in the world of faceless angels.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sheridan

    I would say this is an amazing book for parents interested in Waldorf education. It was simple, but gave a great overview into the first years of childhood. A definite must read for Waldorf parents or anyone interested in it. Even if you are not, still a good read. Some great tips. The most helpful - using "you may" instead of "would you" For instance - "would you take out the garbage?" they can say NO! "You may take out the garbage now." It is amazing how great this works!!! I would say this is an amazing book for parents interested in Waldorf education. It was simple, but gave a great overview into the first years of childhood. A definite must read for Waldorf parents or anyone interested in it. Even if you are not, still a good read. Some great tips. The most helpful - using "you may" instead of "would you" For instance - "would you take out the garbage?" they can say NO! "You may take out the garbage now." It is amazing how great this works!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This book is similar to other Waldorf family/parenting books. The exceptional part, and chapter most helpful to me, is about Creative Discipline and the magic word of "may". It would be worth checking out at a library for this chapter. Otherwise the rest of the content gets covered in other books like Simplicity Parenting or You Are Your Child's First Teacher, which I like better. The format of some of this book is a bit hard to follow because of the recorded conversations. This book is similar to other Waldorf family/parenting books. The exceptional part, and chapter most helpful to me, is about Creative Discipline and the magic word of "may". It would be worth checking out at a library for this chapter. Otherwise the rest of the content gets covered in other books like Simplicity Parenting or You Are Your Child's First Teacher, which I like better. The format of some of this book is a bit hard to follow because of the recorded conversations.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Medlin

    I loved the chapter on creative discipline. The rest of the book was good, but just basic Waldorf philosophy, nothing that new or different. If you are unfamiliar with Waldorf, it would be a good introduction. If you are familiar with Waldorf, it might be a bit repetitive of what you already know.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    This book is an interesting guide to developing routines and environments that encourage children to develop into whole, well balanced adults. It is a sweet, nurturing approach to childhood, but is a little to gentle, inasmuch as I got bored and couldn't finish it. It may prove more useful when my daughter is older. This book is an interesting guide to developing routines and environments that encourage children to develop into whole, well balanced adults. It is a sweet, nurturing approach to childhood, but is a little to gentle, inasmuch as I got bored and couldn't finish it. It may prove more useful when my daughter is older.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kit

    I thought it would be more useful for people not attending a Waldorf school - but clearly it was directed at families utilizing that type of school. In addition, a lot of the recommendations were too vague to be practical or I had read elsewhere.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shalinee

    First parenting book I ever read from start to finish...despite Kavya's attempts to hide the book from me twice (meaning of that act not lost on me!). Good introduction to Waldorf early childhood education. Even if you filter out the Waldorfian references, it's a good parenting book. First parenting book I ever read from start to finish...despite Kavya's attempts to hide the book from me twice (meaning of that act not lost on me!). Good introduction to Waldorf early childhood education. Even if you filter out the Waldorfian references, it's a good parenting book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    Lots of useful activities for engaging the senses. I love love love the tip for getting kids to cooperate. You use the phrase "you may..." and it is working for my willful three year old Lots of useful activities for engaging the senses. I love love love the tip for getting kids to cooperate. You use the phrase "you may..." and it is working for my willful three year old

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie

    I'm not totally convinced Waldorf is the way to go but I did glean lots of ideas from this book. Great sections on outdoor time, rhythms and doll play. I'm not totally convinced Waldorf is the way to go but I did glean lots of ideas from this book. Great sections on outdoor time, rhythms and doll play.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    There were some sweet and tender moments in this book which I will take into my life as a parent. There were also some of those dogmatic pronouncements that risk souring the whole experience. General reflection: we are waiting for parents to meet the movement, and we are doing a poor job of meeting parents where they are. The kind of suggestions (although they come across more as rules, like what shape dolls should have at what age and what color walls should be painted to reflect the light in a There were some sweet and tender moments in this book which I will take into my life as a parent. There were also some of those dogmatic pronouncements that risk souring the whole experience. General reflection: we are waiting for parents to meet the movement, and we are doing a poor job of meeting parents where they are. The kind of suggestions (although they come across more as rules, like what shape dolls should have at what age and what color walls should be painted to reflect the light in a particular way) set forth here work for only a very, very, very, very, extremely, undoubtedly, far too small sample of the population. I get that off-the-beaten-path movements start small and always sound strange when compared to the mainstream. But the attitude conveyed in this book still remains so much at the letter of the law, rather than of the spirit. I find it disempowering overall, even if at moments it's truly inspiring or enlightening. Like, do beeswax crayons really have a significantly different color saturation than regular crayons and therefore impact a child's sight in a meaningful way? As a Waldorf "insider," those are not the battles I want to be fighting. Oh, and by the way, this *is* the book where the author calls any amount of TV "poison." Cheers!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Summers

    We are not a Waldorf family. We use an eclectic blend of several parenting and homeschooling methods, so I read this to get a bit more familiar with Waldorf. There are some things I really like, and others I don’t. Great book if you are a Waldorf family. If not, maybe get it from the library.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melena Anderson

    I consider myself “flexible Waldorf” in that I don’t wholly subscribe to the anthroposophy aspects of this educational model. That being said, the gentle parenting advice included in this book gave me quite a bit to reflect on. I was able to finish this book in one sitting, and I enjoyed it more than I expected. The list of suggested reading and resources at the end was also helpful. As a potential future homeschooling parent, it’s important to me to understand all of the teaching styles availab I consider myself “flexible Waldorf” in that I don’t wholly subscribe to the anthroposophy aspects of this educational model. That being said, the gentle parenting advice included in this book gave me quite a bit to reflect on. I was able to finish this book in one sitting, and I enjoyed it more than I expected. The list of suggested reading and resources at the end was also helpful. As a potential future homeschooling parent, it’s important to me to understand all of the teaching styles available to me and choose the values that are most important and relevant to my family. This book is a nice introductory read, I just wish it was longer.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Iworsky

    Easy read. 3.5 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Ascue

    If I ever have a child, this book will definitely be a night table staple for many many years. In the meantime, I will buy it for all my friends expecting little humans, or already raising some!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Surprised that I didn't like this book more than I did. I've been reading about Waldorf principles for early childhood, and have liked many of them so far. However, this book delves so much into pseudoscience that I wasn't able to recover the parts of Waldorf which intrigue me. It's important to remember that Steiner was much more of a philosopher than an expert in childhood development - and that most of his "theories" are based solely on his own musings, not any sort of fact. (He also has some Surprised that I didn't like this book more than I did. I've been reading about Waldorf principles for early childhood, and have liked many of them so far. However, this book delves so much into pseudoscience that I wasn't able to recover the parts of Waldorf which intrigue me. It's important to remember that Steiner was much more of a philosopher than an expert in childhood development - and that most of his "theories" are based solely on his own musings, not any sort of fact. (He also has some worrying opinions about reincarnation - the quality of which he believes to be tied to race/skin color, but that's another subject entirely) Definitely some interesting content for those interested in Waldorf, but overall too heavily leaning on the pseudoscience side for my tastes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    WhizKid

    Ms.Gun let me borrow during the first week of school so that I can have a better understanding of the nursery and teaching practices. My husband wrapped it nicely with brown paper so it stays clean (He's the best). I've been reading it during my commute. "To all children everywhere especially those who have been our greatest teachers" Ms.Gun let me borrow during the first week of school so that I can have a better understanding of the nursery and teaching practices. My husband wrapped it nicely with brown paper so it stays clean (He's the best). I've been reading it during my commute. "To all children everywhere especially those who have been our greatest teachers"

  19. 5 out of 5

    R. C.

    This is going to be a terribly personal write-up that will probably not tell you anything about the book itself. I re-read this one for my Re-Reading Old Well-Knowns festival. I remember not liking it at all when I was a young mother. It felt preachy to me then, somehow. Now, I'm not finding any of that. Maybe I've been whittled by my years of actual parenting - all three of my kids are now seven or older - into something more humble and more certain at once, so I can meet the author where she i This is going to be a terribly personal write-up that will probably not tell you anything about the book itself. I re-read this one for my Re-Reading Old Well-Knowns festival. I remember not liking it at all when I was a young mother. It felt preachy to me then, somehow. Now, I'm not finding any of that. Maybe I've been whittled by my years of actual parenting - all three of my kids are now seven or older - into something more humble and more certain at once, so I can meet the author where she is. I appreciated the reminder of why I did the things I do. In a few places I was stunned to see that where I had failed matched the difficulties I now have. Re-reading this made a lovely wrap-up to my years of parenting children from birth to age seven, and refreshed me for whatever future journeys with babies I may have.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Everything included in here was written in a much more interesting way in other Waldorf inspired books like my favorite Heaven on Earth. Maybe it was just my mood but the simplistic way that she offered solutions to common discipline issues turned me off. It's definitely not so simple and every child is so different! And seriously, why can't the kids just toss around the knitted animals?! You may toss these wool balls... You may play with the knitted animals in the barn. Okay okay it must be my mo Everything included in here was written in a much more interesting way in other Waldorf inspired books like my favorite Heaven on Earth. Maybe it was just my mood but the simplistic way that she offered solutions to common discipline issues turned me off. It's definitely not so simple and every child is so different! And seriously, why can't the kids just toss around the knitted animals?! You may toss these wool balls... You may play with the knitted animals in the barn. Okay okay it must be my mood!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    I really enjoyed this book. It took a while for me to have some quite to sit and read it. But the way it tells how to speak to children and the why or all of it I will find very helpful. Instead of giving choices because children get way too many choices and become self-centered, which I can now see it. I will try some of these things out for sure. One more great resource is the appendix has at least 20 pages of books to read with short summaries which I have been searching for.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christine Harold

    This is an introduction to the Waldorf model of education that was recommended to me by someone at the Seattle Waldorf school. It's definitely outside the mainstream of parenting and education literature, but a lot of it really resonates with me. I learned a lot. May be a little "crunchy" for some. This is an introduction to the Waldorf model of education that was recommended to me by someone at the Seattle Waldorf school. It's definitely outside the mainstream of parenting and education literature, but a lot of it really resonates with me. I learned a lot. May be a little "crunchy" for some.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Suzie

    This is a good overview of Waldorf principals. I knew most of it already, but I'm glad to have this on my shelf as a reference and a reminder. I especially appreciated the chapter on creative discipline, and the Rainbow Bridge birthday stories. I would recommend this to anyone wanting to try a more nurturing, gentle approach to early childhood education and development. This is a good overview of Waldorf principals. I knew most of it already, but I'm glad to have this on my shelf as a reference and a reminder. I especially appreciated the chapter on creative discipline, and the Rainbow Bridge birthday stories. I would recommend this to anyone wanting to try a more nurturing, gentle approach to early childhood education and development.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kiki

    I really enjoyed this book. Even though, after researching and attending some Waldorf classes with my daughter, I decided Waldorf wasn't for us, this was a really good book. A good way to dip your toes into the world of Waldorf and learn a bit about this approach to parenting/education. I really enjoyed this book. Even though, after researching and attending some Waldorf classes with my daughter, I decided Waldorf wasn't for us, this was a really good book. A good way to dip your toes into the world of Waldorf and learn a bit about this approach to parenting/education.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Seems to be more about anthroposophy than Waldorf-style education - I wonder if they are as dependent on each other as this book makes it seem? I like the patterns in the back for Waldorf dolls, though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    One of the first Steiner parenting books I read, and I've recently read a second time. Easy to read, it explains simple but important principles such as the importance of rhythm, breathing in and breathing out time, and is a nice gentle introduction to Steiner approaches to early childhood. One of the first Steiner parenting books I read, and I've recently read a second time. Easy to read, it explains simple but important principles such as the importance of rhythm, breathing in and breathing out time, and is a nice gentle introduction to Steiner approaches to early childhood.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    A friend gifted me this book a while ago, and even though we don't have a Waldorf school in my area, there is so much I can incorporate in my three year old's development. Loaded with tons of resources and references. A friend gifted me this book a while ago, and even though we don't have a Waldorf school in my area, there is so much I can incorporate in my three year old's development. Loaded with tons of resources and references.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    Excellent book to read if you are considering a Steiner Education for your children, very informative and inspiring, actually reinforced my decision for our children to attend Steiner School for their entire schooling years.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Aside from Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care, this is the best book I have ever read about raising children. Aside from Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care, this is the best book I have ever read about raising children.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    I just finished this one. Of all the books I've read to try to incorporate Waldorf methods into my homeschooling, this has been the most helpful. I just finished this one. Of all the books I've read to try to incorporate Waldorf methods into my homeschooling, this has been the most helpful.

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