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The Belgian Cookbook

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SAVORIES: If you serve these, let them be, like an ankle, small and neat and alluring. This dish is not obligatory; recollect that it is but a culinary work of supererogation. SOUP: Let your soup be extremely hot; do not let it be like the Laodiceans. You know what St. John said about them, and you would be sorry to think of your soup sharing the fate which he describes with su SAVORIES: If you serve these, let them be, like an ankle, small and neat and alluring. This dish is not obligatory; recollect that it is but a culinary work of supererogation. SOUP: Let your soup be extremely hot; do not let it be like the Laodiceans. You know what St. John said about them, and you would be sorry to think of your soup sharing the fate which he describes with such saintly verve. Be sure that your soup has a good foundation, and avoid the Italian method of making _consommé_, which is to put a pot of water on to warm and to drive a cow past the door. FISH: It is a truism to say that fish should be absolutely fresh, yet only too many cooks think, during the week-end, that fish is like the manna of the Hebrews, which was imbued with Sabbatarian principles that kept it fresh from Saturday to Monday. I implore of you to think differently about fish. It is a most nourishing and strengthening food --other qualities it has, too, if one must believe the anecdote of the Sultan Saladin and the two anchorites. MEAT: If your meat must be cooked in water, let it not boil but merely simmer; let the pot just whisper agreeably of a good dish to come. Do you know what an English tourist said, looking into a Moorish cooking-pot? "What have you got there? Mutton and rice?" "For the moment, Sidi, it is mutton and rice," said the Moorish cook; "but in two hours, inshallah, when the garlic has kissed the pot, it will be the most delicious comforter from Mecca to Casa Blanca." Simmer and season, then, your meats, and let the onion (if not garlic) just kiss the pot, even if you allow no further intimacy between them. Use bay-leaves, spices, herbs of all sorts, vinegar, cloves; and never forget pepper and salt. Game is like Love, the best appreciated when it begins to go. Only experience will teach you, on blowing up the breast feathers of a pheasant, whether it ought to be cooked to-day or to-morrow. Men, as a rule, are very particular about the dressing of game, though they may not all be able to tell, like the Frenchman, upon which of her legs a partridge was in the habit of sitting. Game should be underdone rather than well done; it should never be without well-buttered toast underneath it to collect the gravy, and the knife to carve it with should be very, very sharp. VEGETABLES: Nearly all these are at their best (like brunettes) just before they are fully matured. So says a great authority, and no doubt he is thinking of young peas and beans, lettuces and asparagus. Try to dress such things as potatoes, parsnips, cabbages, carrots, in other ways than simply boiled in water, for the water often removes the flavor and leaves the fiber. Do not let your vegetable-dishes remind your guests of Froissart's account of Scotchmen's food, which was "rubbed in a little water."


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SAVORIES: If you serve these, let them be, like an ankle, small and neat and alluring. This dish is not obligatory; recollect that it is but a culinary work of supererogation. SOUP: Let your soup be extremely hot; do not let it be like the Laodiceans. You know what St. John said about them, and you would be sorry to think of your soup sharing the fate which he describes with su SAVORIES: If you serve these, let them be, like an ankle, small and neat and alluring. This dish is not obligatory; recollect that it is but a culinary work of supererogation. SOUP: Let your soup be extremely hot; do not let it be like the Laodiceans. You know what St. John said about them, and you would be sorry to think of your soup sharing the fate which he describes with such saintly verve. Be sure that your soup has a good foundation, and avoid the Italian method of making _consommé_, which is to put a pot of water on to warm and to drive a cow past the door. FISH: It is a truism to say that fish should be absolutely fresh, yet only too many cooks think, during the week-end, that fish is like the manna of the Hebrews, which was imbued with Sabbatarian principles that kept it fresh from Saturday to Monday. I implore of you to think differently about fish. It is a most nourishing and strengthening food --other qualities it has, too, if one must believe the anecdote of the Sultan Saladin and the two anchorites. MEAT: If your meat must be cooked in water, let it not boil but merely simmer; let the pot just whisper agreeably of a good dish to come. Do you know what an English tourist said, looking into a Moorish cooking-pot? "What have you got there? Mutton and rice?" "For the moment, Sidi, it is mutton and rice," said the Moorish cook; "but in two hours, inshallah, when the garlic has kissed the pot, it will be the most delicious comforter from Mecca to Casa Blanca." Simmer and season, then, your meats, and let the onion (if not garlic) just kiss the pot, even if you allow no further intimacy between them. Use bay-leaves, spices, herbs of all sorts, vinegar, cloves; and never forget pepper and salt. Game is like Love, the best appreciated when it begins to go. Only experience will teach you, on blowing up the breast feathers of a pheasant, whether it ought to be cooked to-day or to-morrow. Men, as a rule, are very particular about the dressing of game, though they may not all be able to tell, like the Frenchman, upon which of her legs a partridge was in the habit of sitting. Game should be underdone rather than well done; it should never be without well-buttered toast underneath it to collect the gravy, and the knife to carve it with should be very, very sharp. VEGETABLES: Nearly all these are at their best (like brunettes) just before they are fully matured. So says a great authority, and no doubt he is thinking of young peas and beans, lettuces and asparagus. Try to dress such things as potatoes, parsnips, cabbages, carrots, in other ways than simply boiled in water, for the water often removes the flavor and leaves the fiber. Do not let your vegetable-dishes remind your guests of Froissart's account of Scotchmen's food, which was "rubbed in a little water."

55 review for The Belgian Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie Barrett

    The Belgian Cookbook TOC where recipes are broken up into food categories. Preface talks about Belgian refugees that the author got the recipes from. Different food categories and meals are discussed. Each recipe starts with a title. Some do not even list the ingredients. Paragraph following the title tells you what ingredients to add and how to make the dish. There are no pictures, no servings, no nutritional information. Pink rice, what a cool idea for a kid to enjoy using beets! Index is included a The Belgian Cookbook TOC where recipes are broken up into food categories. Preface talks about Belgian refugees that the author got the recipes from. Different food categories and meals are discussed. Each recipe starts with a title. Some do not even list the ingredients. Paragraph following the title tells you what ingredients to add and how to make the dish. There are no pictures, no servings, no nutritional information. Pink rice, what a cool idea for a kid to enjoy using beets! Index is included at the very end. Other books in the series are highlighted at the end. Very hard to read with no list of ingredients and so much more information we are so used to seeing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michele Rice Carpenter

    Interesting Cookbook Many of the recipes in this cookbook I'd not seen before. I'm not even sure I'd be able to find the ingredients, such as skate. The recipes sound interesting, and I look forward to trying some of them. Interesting Cookbook Many of the recipes in this cookbook I'd not seen before. I'm not even sure I'd be able to find the ingredients, such as skate. The recipes sound interesting, and I look forward to trying some of them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pascale

    In this intriguing little book full of recipes “sent by Belgian refugees from all parts of the United Kingdom,” -assumedly refugees from World War I-, with names and qualiticatives such as “Seulette” (“Lonely”), “Pour la Patrie” (“For the Fatherland”), “Chef reconnaissant” (“Grateful Chef”), “une amie au couvent” (“A Friend in a Convent”), etc., one would like to know more about these refugees’ life stories. But the recipes, most of them Belgian standards, nevertheless open a window to a time wh In this intriguing little book full of recipes “sent by Belgian refugees from all parts of the United Kingdom,” -assumedly refugees from World War I-, with names and qualiticatives such as “Seulette” (“Lonely”), “Pour la Patrie” (“For the Fatherland”), “Chef reconnaissant” (“Grateful Chef”), “une amie au couvent” (“A Friend in a Convent”), etc., one would like to know more about these refugees’ life stories. But the recipes, most of them Belgian standards, nevertheless open a window to a time when cooking was hearty and not necessarily caloric-count conscious: cream, milk, potatoes, roasts… It also sounds worthy of experimentation, especially since there are no weight specific indications beyond “ little of…,” “a dab of…,” “a good amount of…,” etc. I wish I could get a copy as fine as the Library’s, which they had to pull out of the stacks (since no one has borrowed this book in a very long time). It was the most gorgeous little book, with a red leather cover.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Sample recipe from the book: "LEEK SOUP. Cut up two onions and fry them till they are brown; you need not use butter, clarified fat will do very well. Clean your leeks, washing them well; cut them in pieces and fry them also; add any other vegetables that you have, two medium-sized potatoes, pepper, salt, and a little water. Let all simmer for three hours, and pass it through a fine sieve. Let there be more leeks than other vegetables, so that their flavor predominates." Sample recipe from the book: "LEEK SOUP. Cut up two onions and fry them till they are brown; you need not use butter, clarified fat will do very well. Clean your leeks, washing them well; cut them in pieces and fry them also; add any other vegetables that you have, two medium-sized potatoes, pepper, salt, and a little water. Let all simmer for three hours, and pass it through a fine sieve. Let there be more leeks than other vegetables, so that their flavor predominates."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hicks

    Interesting This cookbook is presented as it's cooks must have made these recipes a long while ago. Not many measurements and a lot of driving... I don't know how much I'll cook out of it, but a great addition to my cookbooks! Interesting This cookbook is presented as it's cooks must have made these recipes a long while ago. Not many measurements and a lot of driving... I don't know how much I'll cook out of it, but a great addition to my cookbooks!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  7. 4 out of 5

    Canoe41

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sherry B. Horton

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Ottsen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kay Ellicott

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  12. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Marbut

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chant

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lottee Omallee

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Roche

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gary Kemper

  18. 4 out of 5

    F. Wilson

  19. 5 out of 5

    annemie vrints

  20. 5 out of 5

    jamie buckalew

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shelley M Albright

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Gordon

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael Wolfe

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Harper

  25. 5 out of 5

    Redscarletto

  26. 4 out of 5

    Diana Blick

  27. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patrick MacGuire

  29. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

  30. 5 out of 5

    Avis Black

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Rocourt

  32. 5 out of 5

    Rebus7

  33. 4 out of 5

    Mary E.

  34. 5 out of 5

    Justin Renquist

  35. 5 out of 5

    Cal

  36. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  37. 4 out of 5

    Russell

  38. 4 out of 5

    Bob Dobbs

  39. 4 out of 5

    Zuri C.

  40. 4 out of 5

    Gabi Avila

  41. 5 out of 5

    Canoe41

  42. 5 out of 5

    Russell

  43. 5 out of 5

    Barry

  44. 5 out of 5

    Fre

  45. 4 out of 5

    Justin

  46. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Gillespie

  47. 5 out of 5

    Levi Wright

  48. 5 out of 5

    Joannine

  49. 4 out of 5

    Em

  50. 5 out of 5

    Genese Schutt

  51. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

  52. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  53. 4 out of 5

    Erin Anderson

  54. 5 out of 5

    Clarke

  55. 5 out of 5

    Niki

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