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THE QUESTION: Teaching Your Child the Essentials of Classical Education

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30 review for THE QUESTION: Teaching Your Child the Essentials of Classical Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    After reading "The Core" 3-4 times, I had high hopes for "The Question", Leigh Bortins' 2nd book in this series of 3. Unfortunately, I struggled to get through it. Partly because the language itself is difficult and then also because many times too many words were used to illustrate a simple point. Where "The Core" is a simple-to-use, easy to understand book for any homeschooler out there, "The Question" is geared specifically to Leigh's homeschool program "Classical Conversations". Although I'v After reading "The Core" 3-4 times, I had high hopes for "The Question", Leigh Bortins' 2nd book in this series of 3. Unfortunately, I struggled to get through it. Partly because the language itself is difficult and then also because many times too many words were used to illustrate a simple point. Where "The Core" is a simple-to-use, easy to understand book for any homeschooler out there, "The Question" is geared specifically to Leigh's homeschool program "Classical Conversations". Although I've been a part of CC for 7 years now and have a daughter currently participating in Challenge B, I still found the book overwhelming and unclear in many areas. It would be beneficial for Leigh and her team of writers to remember that not all her readers are seasoned classical educators. Some of us need less fancy talk and more practical application.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shaina Herrmann

    If I could give this 10 stars, I would! Wow!๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ This is the second book in a trilogy written by Leigh Bortins, the founder of Classical Conversations. I read this very slowly because there was so much to grasp on each page! Lord willling, I will be rereading this one several more times over the next 14+ years that I plan to be in CC. Also.... what craziness is this?! I just happened finish it exactly one year from the day I started it! This is the second time this has happened to me this month! If I could give this 10 stars, I would! Wow!๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘ This is the second book in a trilogy written by Leigh Bortins, the founder of Classical Conversations. I read this very slowly because there was so much to grasp on each page! Lord willling, I will be rereading this one several more times over the next 14+ years that I plan to be in CC. Also.... what craziness is this?! I just happened finish it exactly one year from the day I started it! This is the second time this has happened to me this month! ๐Ÿ˜ฑ

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kela

    I found The Core to be a very informative book about classical education so I was looking forward to reading The Question, the follow-up geared towards parents of middle- and high-schoolers. Initially I enjoyed the book, but after awhile it became very repetitive. The purpose is to guide parents through five essential questions that will help students become critical/analytical thinkers. Bortins shows the reader how to apply these questions to every subject, from geography to math to literature. I found The Core to be a very informative book about classical education so I was looking forward to reading The Question, the follow-up geared towards parents of middle- and high-schoolers. Initially I enjoyed the book, but after awhile it became very repetitive. The purpose is to guide parents through five essential questions that will help students become critical/analytical thinkers. Bortins shows the reader how to apply these questions to every subject, from geography to math to literature. Each subject is its own chapter, but since the five questions are always the same the book becomes quite tiresome. I eventually gave up on it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Odette Leon

    Great read! This was my second book by Leigh Bortins and geared more for middle school age and high schoolers..Super insightful on how to ask questions to promote thought and how to foster environments where open communication and freedom to think on their own is welcomed..

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shaleece Keithley

    This book is an amazing tool for those interested or already engaged in classical education. Bortin takes the reader through each of the subjects (Math, Science, History, Etc) and gives examples of how to apply the 5 common topics (definition, comparison, relationship, circumstance, and testimony) to each of the subjects. But the core of The Question is built on just that: questions. Questions are the foundation of learning and understanding not only things like Math and Science but also current This book is an amazing tool for those interested or already engaged in classical education. Bortin takes the reader through each of the subjects (Math, Science, History, Etc) and gives examples of how to apply the 5 common topics (definition, comparison, relationship, circumstance, and testimony) to each of the subjects. But the core of The Question is built on just that: questions. Questions are the foundation of learning and understanding not only things like Math and Science but also current events and art. The dialectical stage is when the student takes what he/she has learned in the grammar stage and starts trying to figure out what it all means. A timeline becomes more than just a string of events but now it has the answers to how culture and history have been shaped. Highly recommend this book if you are considering classical education or as a means of helping your dialectical student develop questions that lead to true learning and understanding.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Thorsen

    This book explains how to integrate the second phase (dialectic) of the classical trivuum into your homeschool. It describes the five common topics (definition, comparison, relationship, circumstance, and testimony), and how to apply them to major subjects of instruction (reading, writing, math, geography and current events,mlogic, history, science, and fine arts). I read this book since Iโ€™m following the Classical Conversations curriculum and it behooves me to understand the teaching methodolog This book explains how to integrate the second phase (dialectic) of the classical trivuum into your homeschool. It describes the five common topics (definition, comparison, relationship, circumstance, and testimony), and how to apply them to major subjects of instruction (reading, writing, math, geography and current events,mlogic, history, science, and fine arts). I read this book since Iโ€™m following the Classical Conversations curriculum and it behooves me to understand the teaching methodology. The book delivered on describing the system, but I wasnโ€™t thrilled with it because it did nothing to make me energized and excited to implement this in my homeschool. There are other more motivating books out there.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Great book on how to teach your child through a classical education. This book is geared toward children who are in Dialectic phase of learning, around 12-14. The author thoroughly covers the five common topics as well as how to implement these topics and ask good questions in each area of study. So much good information and I'm going to have to return to this book at least every year for reminders.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I just read this as my classically-educated daughter is entering 7th grade, which Bortins recognizes as the beginning of the "Dialectic" stage. I enjoyed this book more than her first one, which covers the "Grammar" (elementary) stage because it feels like this finally gets to the heart of the classical model. Students in this stage start asking more questions and synthesizing the information they memorized in previous years, so it's inherently more satisfying.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Blaha

    The Question has definitely stirred up my desire to be thorough in educating my children. I love how this book painted the picture of how to walk through the five common topics: definition, comparison, relationship, circumstance and testimony. I'm looking forward to walking through the ideals presented in this book and having in depth discussions with my children on a plethora of topics. This book is inspiring and a good read for any parent homeschooling their children.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    It was good. It had a lot of good information about classical education and how it helps enrich your students life and not just master skills needed for school, but to make them a more enlightened human being in general. However, I donโ€™t think every student fits the mold they describe. Not all kids are that naturally inquisitive and I think it probably is a lot harder to implement everything she says in the book then how she makes it sound! But it is a good reference.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adrianne

    This book literally not only changed my homeschooling approach but day to day life interactions with my children. Itโ€™s worth itโ€™s weight in gold. If you are in CC especially I recommend reading this book by the time your oldest is 7-8 and especially before you enter Essentials. Iโ€™m happy I read this and canโ€™t wait to finish out the trilogy now ๐Ÿ˜

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    A good reminder of our aim into the next season of homeschooling. I really enjoyed the general principles as they were given in Part 1 over the way it plays out specifically in each subject in Part 2. (But that's probably because we're not there yet in our journey.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Practical, engaging handbook for the dialectic process.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kaytee Cobb

    Getting excited about this next phase! Glad I had a "book club" to read along with

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    My favorite quote from the book: "I want to be sure that the time my family spends in academics aids rather than hinders my children's ability to resolve conflict, to seek peace, and to be content with tension. They need to know not only how to answer hard questions abut also how to live with circumstances beyond their control without trying to control others. It seems like the purpose of education has become, as C.S. Lewis identifies it in That Hideous Strength, the ability for some to control o My favorite quote from the book: "I want to be sure that the time my family spends in academics aids rather than hinders my children's ability to resolve conflict, to seek peace, and to be content with tension. They need to know not only how to answer hard questions abut also how to live with circumstances beyond their control without trying to control others. It seems like the purpose of education has become, as C.S. Lewis identifies it in That Hideous Strength, the ability for some to control others. Instead, the classical model teaches young people to control themselves. Christian education teaches that self-control is impossible without the aid of the Holy Spirit." "The Question" advocates life-long learning. This is a family endeavor that revolves more and more around discourse as our children mature. The chapters help us brainstorm as parents how we can begin the conversation with our children on a variety of subjects. Asking questions takes work, and I was grateful for Leigh's honesty about the struggle as a parent of allowing our children to work through this process without being fed the answers. I believe this endeavor is worthy of our attention, humility, and effort for it will bear much fruit- in us and our children.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kerrie

    This is the "sequel" to The Core, by the same author. This book is for parents and tutors of the Challenge level in Classical Conversations. I have to say I enjoyed The Core more, but The Question has a lot of good information in it too. The only thing that gets laborious is that for each subject Bortins discusses, she goes into the five common questions and how that subject can be dealt with using them. That gets old after a while. I will finish it as time allows, but at this point,I only pick This is the "sequel" to The Core, by the same author. This book is for parents and tutors of the Challenge level in Classical Conversations. I have to say I enjoyed The Core more, but The Question has a lot of good information in it too. The only thing that gets laborious is that for each subject Bortins discusses, she goes into the five common questions and how that subject can be dealt with using them. That gets old after a while. I will finish it as time allows, but at this point,I only pick it up every once in a while.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brent Rosendal

    A good book on the classical model of homeschooling. Some of things taught and recommended are geared for kids older than mine and so I will definitely read this one again when our son is in middle school. The book gave me a deeper understanding and appreciation for the classical model of homeschooling.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    There are plenty of books that provide vision and inspiration to parents who are educating at home. However, many of these leave me thinking, "That's all very nice, but how about giving me something I can use?" This book provides inspiration as well as the 'how-to' element those other books do not provide.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Corkum

    An excellent book on educating Middle School Aged children. Should be read AFTER the Core. Even though I would not recommend the organization Classical Conversations because of structure and ethical concerns, Leigh has the best, modern books on classical education.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joellen Armstrong

    Wonderfully detailed book about homeschooling classically during the dialectic stage. Filled with information on how the integrate subjects in this stage & generally, how to cope with students who have SO many questions! Lots of encouragement & tons to glean. Wonderfully detailed book about homeschooling classically during the dialectic stage. Filled with information on how the integrate subjects in this stage & generally, how to cope with students who have SO many questions! Lots of encouragement & tons to glean.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ali (Our Book Boyfriends) Flores

    A great help for moving beyond Foundations!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Atwood

  24. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Lewis

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Amole

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Petri

  28. 5 out of 5

    Keri Howell

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lanny

    I read the first half and really enjoyed it. I plan on rereading/finishing the book in a few years when it will actually be applicable to my child.

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