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The Poacher's Daughter

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Winner of the 2015 Wrangler Award for Outstanding Novel "Synopsis: In 1885, young Rose Edwards is widowed by Montana vigilantes who hang her husband for an alleged theft, then burn her Yellowstone Valley cabin to the ground as a warning for her and others of her kind to quit the territory. Penniless and illiterate, yet fiercely independent, Rose begins a two-year odyssey to Winner of the 2015 Wrangler Award for Outstanding Novel "Synopsis: In 1885, young Rose Edwards is widowed by Montana vigilantes who hang her husband for an alleged theft, then burn her Yellowstone Valley cabin to the ground as a warning for her and others of her kind to quit the territory. Penniless and illiterate, yet fiercely independent, Rose begins a two-year odyssey to revisit the land of her childhood, a land she once traveled with her father, an itinerant robe trader among the Assiniboines and Blackfeet. But the old ways of the hunter and trapper are disappearing. European investors are flooding the bison ranges with vast herds of cattle, raising mansions and polo fields on ground once claimed by teepees and sod-roofed hunters' shacks. With an aging roan gelding named Albert as her closest friend, Rose finds herself a reluctant hero in an ageless battle, the face of an indigenous population, both native and white, as she stubbornly pushes back against the invading aristocracy. And hanging over her every decision is an alcoholic father, who hunts bison inside the newly formed Yellowstone National Park, selling the mounted heads and tanned robes to Eastern tourists even as his daughter makes her stand against the destruction of the land she loves"--


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Winner of the 2015 Wrangler Award for Outstanding Novel "Synopsis: In 1885, young Rose Edwards is widowed by Montana vigilantes who hang her husband for an alleged theft, then burn her Yellowstone Valley cabin to the ground as a warning for her and others of her kind to quit the territory. Penniless and illiterate, yet fiercely independent, Rose begins a two-year odyssey to Winner of the 2015 Wrangler Award for Outstanding Novel "Synopsis: In 1885, young Rose Edwards is widowed by Montana vigilantes who hang her husband for an alleged theft, then burn her Yellowstone Valley cabin to the ground as a warning for her and others of her kind to quit the territory. Penniless and illiterate, yet fiercely independent, Rose begins a two-year odyssey to revisit the land of her childhood, a land she once traveled with her father, an itinerant robe trader among the Assiniboines and Blackfeet. But the old ways of the hunter and trapper are disappearing. European investors are flooding the bison ranges with vast herds of cattle, raising mansions and polo fields on ground once claimed by teepees and sod-roofed hunters' shacks. With an aging roan gelding named Albert as her closest friend, Rose finds herself a reluctant hero in an ageless battle, the face of an indigenous population, both native and white, as she stubbornly pushes back against the invading aristocracy. And hanging over her every decision is an alcoholic father, who hunts bison inside the newly formed Yellowstone National Park, selling the mounted heads and tanned robes to Eastern tourists even as his daughter makes her stand against the destruction of the land she loves"--

30 review for The Poacher's Daughter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Connie G

    Michael Zimmer's love and knowledge of the Old West are evident in his book The Poacher's Daughter. Set in Montana Territory in 1885, Rose Edward's husband has been murdered by vigilantes and her cabin has been burned down. Rose had a tough childhood with her alcoholic hunter father and a bunch of brothers, learning to ride and shoot as well as any man. She sees the way of life changing in the West as the Native Americans and buffalo are destroyed. Cattlemen with large tracts of land are running Michael Zimmer's love and knowledge of the Old West are evident in his book The Poacher's Daughter. Set in Montana Territory in 1885, Rose Edward's husband has been murdered by vigilantes and her cabin has been burned down. Rose had a tough childhood with her alcoholic hunter father and a bunch of brothers, learning to ride and shoot as well as any man. She sees the way of life changing in the West as the Native Americans and buffalo are destroyed. Cattlemen with large tracts of land are running out the people with the small holdings of property. The destitute woman works with horse thieves and trappers trying to accumulate a nest egg to fund a new start on her property. Meanwhile her friends are shot or hung by gunmen, hired by the rich cattlemen, who take the law into their own hands. How much of a difference can one determined woman make against the powerful landowners of the Yellowstone Valley? This is an action-packed Western adventure story full of gun battles, written by a man who loves the history of the Old West, and who has participated in reenactments of the period. The author's childhood on a horse ranch gave him the knowledge to write well about Rose's travels on horseback over the trails used by hunters, trappers, and traders in Montana heading into Canada. Some of my favorite parts of the book showed the softer side of Rose with her love for her horse, and her respect for the way of life of the Native Americans. It did seem like Rose led a bit of a charmed life considering how many shootouts she was involved in. Montana in 1885 was a dangerous place, full of physical hardship, but also possessing much natural beauty. Thanks to First Reads for a copy of this book. The author has an interesting website: www.michael-zimmer.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    I haven't read much Western fiction since "Lonesome Dove" but I was intrigued by all the 4 and 5 star GR reviews I read about this Western story of a young Montana woman trying to survive and find peace in the hardscrabble 1880's Montana Territory. Rose Edwards is an uneducated young widow who finds herself in the wrong place at the wrong times but always keeps her basic humanity as she's faced with the ups and downs of life on the often violent Plains. Her best friend is her horse and her frien I haven't read much Western fiction since "Lonesome Dove" but I was intrigued by all the 4 and 5 star GR reviews I read about this Western story of a young Montana woman trying to survive and find peace in the hardscrabble 1880's Montana Territory. Rose Edwards is an uneducated young widow who finds herself in the wrong place at the wrong times but always keeps her basic humanity as she's faced with the ups and downs of life on the often violent Plains. Her best friend is her horse and her friends are mostly horse thieves and outlaws but her innate nobility of spirit is what makes this a classic. I loved this book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Jellets

    Great Gunslingers! A FANTASTIC western that ranks as one of my BEST BOOKS of the year! I am not generally a fan of westerns. In fact, before Michael Zimmer’s The Poacher’s Daughter, I don’t think I’d read a single book within the genre. But this book … it detonated like dynamite in my hands … and ranks not just as a fantastic western adventure, but as one of my very best books of the year. Without a doubt, The Poacher’s Daughter, is a powerhouse, capable of standing shoulder-to-shoulder with fict Great Gunslingers! A FANTASTIC western that ranks as one of my BEST BOOKS of the year! I am not generally a fan of westerns. In fact, before Michael Zimmer’s The Poacher’s Daughter, I don’t think I’d read a single book within the genre. But this book … it detonated like dynamite in my hands … and ranks not just as a fantastic western adventure, but as one of my very best books of the year. Without a doubt, The Poacher’s Daughter, is a powerhouse, capable of standing shoulder-to-shoulder with fiction in any genre, the kind of book that two days after finishing, keeps you stuck musing on the plot and characters. A Booklist review raved that “all westerns should be this good” – well … that’s true … but perhaps even more true is that “all fiction should be this good.” The Poacher’s Daughter is the story of Rose Edwards, an amalgam of many real-life frontier women (who Zimmer kindly credits in the dedication to this book) who transitions from horse thief to homesteader to outlaw. Like a rock buffeted by storms and sea, Rose is very much at odds with forces beyond her control – nature, economics, class warfare, and brutal enemies – but she is also a wonderfully endearing heroine with a gentle heart and steel in her spine. I can’t remember rooting this hard for a character since Indiana Jones in Raiders of the Lost Ark. Of course, characterization is just one of the many things Zimmer does very, very well. His settings are so rich you can almost taste the dust of the plains in your teeth or feel the heat of the saloons on your cheeks. His language is authentic, and the pages of this book are chock full of historical detail that immerses the reader in the western world without swallowing him (or her) in a quicksand of minutia. Zimmer’s plotting skills are also tremendous, weaving a host of characters’ lives into an amazingly complex fabric that twists, turns, intersects, and surprises, but most importantly, always feels organic and always keeps the pages turning. This is a book to be devoured. Though I am far from a diehard western fan, Zimmer was still able to hook me like an expert angler by page two, landing me in world that was obviously quite dangerous (the notion of the Stranglers still gives me gooseflesh) but also immensely interesting. His chase scenes pound with tension, as horses and riders play cat-and-mouse over the bad lands, the pace of my reading quickening as the protagonists closed. I read the last four or so chapters of the book on one breath (I swear), holding it as Zimmer ratchets up the tension to piano wire tautness. And then the final three pages – a tenderness that will make your eyes tear -- to a POW! of a finale – this is a book that echoes like a thunderclap and reaches a deep place in your heart. Simply put, with The Poacher’s Daughter Zimmer is crafting legend. On one level, the crafting occurs within the novel as the person of Rose Edwards is slowly replaced with the legend of "Rose of Yellowstone". Zimmer handles this metamorphosis quite cleverly with the growth of Rose’s new persona largely occurring off-camera as the stories of her exploits are told and retold around campfires and saloons – far from Rose’s ability to fact correct -- becoming larger with each telling. Like Rose, we as readers, are only dimly aware of this gradual refashioning until we stumble upon the end result. For people desperately in need of something to believe in, Rose quickly becomes a symbol, transitioning from person to folk hero. But just as importantly, Zimmer is creating a broader legend outside his own novel by crafting a character, an every woman, who embodies the independent spirit of both the frontier and the average human being. Like the folklore that grew-up around Bonnie and Clyde – or perhaps more accurately Robin Hood – Zimmer taps into that same well for Rose, channeling that universal human desire for an archetypal hero who favors justice over the flawed laws of men, which are easily bent to serve immoral ends. Immensely satisfying and thoroughly enjoyable, I have nothing but praise for The Poacher’s Daughter.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joe Stack

    The westerns by Michael Zimmer are too well written to pass up. With THE POACHER'S DAUGHTER, Mr. Zimmer has set a high bar, one that may be difficult for him to follow. His writing style is engaging; there are no wasted words. He takes his time telling the story. You feel as if you're there. His characters, particularly Rose the main character, are likable, have their flaws or weaknesses. Mr. Zimmer knows history and uses that knowledge to frame his story which takes place at a time when the Wes The westerns by Michael Zimmer are too well written to pass up. With THE POACHER'S DAUGHTER, Mr. Zimmer has set a high bar, one that may be difficult for him to follow. His writing style is engaging; there are no wasted words. He takes his time telling the story. You feel as if you're there. His characters, particularly Rose the main character, are likable, have their flaws or weaknesses. Mr. Zimmer knows history and uses that knowledge to frame his story which takes place at a time when the West was changing, the open range disappearing. Rose and her friends are the west that is being forcibly changed by the hired vigilantes. Their struggle, her struggle, to cope leads to remarkable adventures with slips and turns that catch you by surprise. The story grabbed me right from the first paragraph. When done, I passed the book to my wife who does not read westerns, and she was as captivated as I was. A reader won't find their time wasted by reading this story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Sundell

    No matter your opinion of frontier fiction, you'll like Michael Zimmer's wonderful title, the Poacher's Daughter. It has heart, history, heroism, and hell . . . all in one! His knowledge of the West is worth the price, alone. The attention to detail is mesmerizing. Rose of Yellowstone is an unforgettable character and I refuse to give anything about her away. You read the Poacher's Daughter, and then we'll talk :-) I highly recommend this title! The truth is, I don't read as much as I should. My No matter your opinion of frontier fiction, you'll like Michael Zimmer's wonderful title, the Poacher's Daughter. It has heart, history, heroism, and hell . . . all in one! His knowledge of the West is worth the price, alone. The attention to detail is mesmerizing. Rose of Yellowstone is an unforgettable character and I refuse to give anything about her away. You read the Poacher's Daughter, and then we'll talk :-) I highly recommend this title! The truth is, I don't read as much as I should. My bad, entirely. Before reading the Poacher's Daughter, the last book I read was David McCullough's, John Adams. Before that, the Year of Wonders. I'm slow to catch on to the fastest bestsellers :-) Joanne Sundell

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    Sweet and stark and gutsy and feminist and achingly arcahic yet today's headline modern. Best western since Lonesome Dove. & As good. "Synopsis: In 1885, young Rose Edwards is widowed by Montana vigilantes who hang her husband for an alleged theft, then burn her Yellowstone Valley cabin to the ground as a warning for her and others of her kind to quit the territory. Penniless and illiterate, yet fiercely independent, Rose begins a two-year odyssey to revisit the land of her childhood, a land she Sweet and stark and gutsy and feminist and achingly arcahic yet today's headline modern. Best western since Lonesome Dove. & As good. "Synopsis: In 1885, young Rose Edwards is widowed by Montana vigilantes who hang her husband for an alleged theft, then burn her Yellowstone Valley cabin to the ground as a warning for her and others of her kind to quit the territory. Penniless and illiterate, yet fiercely independent, Rose begins a two-year odyssey to revisit the land of her childhood, a land she once traveled with her father, an itinerant robe trader among the Assiniboines and Blackfeet. But the old ways of the hunter and trapper are disappearing. European investors are flooding the bison ranges with vast herds of cattle, raising mansions and polo fields on ground once claimed by teepees and sod-roofed hunters' shacks. With an aging roan gelding named Albert as her closest friend, Rose finds herself a reluctant hero in an ageless battle, the face of an indigenous population, both native and white, as she stubbornly pushes back against the invading aristocracy. And hanging over her every decision is an alcoholic father, who hunts bison inside the newly formed Yellowstone National Park, selling the mounted heads and tanned robes to Eastern tourists even as his daughter makes her stand against the destruction of the land she loves"--

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Schipper

    Good stuff! I liked this story for several reasons, first it was fast paced and action filled. Second, I really liked the main character, and third it was soo good! I'm surprised that a male author could write a story about a woman, but he rocked it! I loved Rose..such an interesting story. Good stuff! I liked this story for several reasons, first it was fast paced and action filled. Second, I really liked the main character, and third it was soo good! I'm surprised that a male author could write a story about a woman, but he rocked it! I loved Rose..such an interesting story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    One of the best Westerns I have read in a very long time. All the characters ring true to the history of the time and places described. An intelligent Western whose story of a strong-willed independent woman will remain in readers mind long after the last page is read. Recommended

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    Audiobook. The synopsis does not do this one justice. Four stars because it starts out slow and there isn't much to grab you in the first five or six chapters but stick with it. It gets much better. Audiobook. The synopsis does not do this one justice. Four stars because it starts out slow and there isn't much to grab you in the first five or six chapters but stick with it. It gets much better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    If I could give this more than 5 stars, I would. I am not usually into this time period for historical fiction but the character and landscape sucked me in. It is by far the best book that I have read so far this year. I love books that have a strong female lead and one that doesn't expect a man to save her all the time and this is certainly one of those books and to find one in this landscape of the old west is rare at least for me. It was brilliantly written and the ending could not have been If I could give this more than 5 stars, I would. I am not usually into this time period for historical fiction but the character and landscape sucked me in. It is by far the best book that I have read so far this year. I love books that have a strong female lead and one that doesn't expect a man to save her all the time and this is certainly one of those books and to find one in this landscape of the old west is rare at least for me. It was brilliantly written and the ending could not have been more perfect for her.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

    Took me a while to get into this book. But, once I did, the characters and story were great. I love Albert and several tears were shed over him... A worthy read if you like American history and the mythical Wild West.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    One of the best of the year.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    Compared to other westerns I've read, this one had a slow burn. The title character is Rose Edwards and at the very beginning she's standing near the burning remains of her Montana home after her husband was hung by a lynch mob, and so begins a series of ups and down for Rose that seems to bring more downs than anything. She joins up with a couple of horse thieves who frequent the trail near her home and joins their gang for lack of anywhere else to go. The main concern for Rose and the others ar Compared to other westerns I've read, this one had a slow burn. The title character is Rose Edwards and at the very beginning she's standing near the burning remains of her Montana home after her husband was hung by a lynch mob, and so begins a series of ups and down for Rose that seems to bring more downs than anything. She joins up with a couple of horse thieves who frequent the trail near her home and joins their gang for lack of anywhere else to go. The main concern for Rose and the others are the various cattlemen in the state, many who seem to be coming in from outside the country and are pushing out the homesteaders and frontiersmen as well as natives in the cattlemen's pursuit. Rose runs afoul of their various henchmen in her journeys back and forth, and the longer she goes the more she finds herself and her friends pushed around by those who think they can just buy the legality they need. The first two thirds of the book have, as I've noted above, a very slow burn and perhaps could have been cut back some if only to bring the pacing and timing a little better. Moreover, though the book takes place in Yellowstone and Montana, I rarely felt like I was experiencing the regions in this work. The location is central to the plot, but I didn't feel I knew it any better. I suppose this is much why it took me longer than usual to get through this book. The last third is where we get the payoff. Rose loses just about everything and is finally pushed to the end. She finally chooses to seek vengeance on those that wronged her and finds that there are many who sympathize and support her. Moreover she's developed a regional reputation from her year of riding with the horse thieves. The book explores the ideas of legality vs. justice. The wealthy cattlemen seem to be able to buy whatever legality they want, but it's apparent that even if they can make something legal they can't make it just, and the rest of the people can see the lack of the latte, even if they don't know how to remedy this. In fact, Rose has to do many illegal acts to exact the justice that's required, and even though everyone can recognize the illegality of these acts many show they prefer justice over mere legality. Overall I found it an okay. I suspect it could do with a bit less and maintain its impact.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Belle

    As a Western, The Poacher’s Daughter ticked all the boxes. With a strong lead character, the olden days of Indians and homesteaders fill the pages. Growing cities are set against a back drop of thievery and violence, as expected from a Western. Saloons and taverns and plains are filled with the everyday bustle of the ever growing West. **********SPOILERS BELOW: Zimmer also explores feminism during a time when the concept was likely foreign. His protagonist, Rose Edwards, defies all stereotypes of As a Western, The Poacher’s Daughter ticked all the boxes. With a strong lead character, the olden days of Indians and homesteaders fill the pages. Growing cities are set against a back drop of thievery and violence, as expected from a Western. Saloons and taverns and plains are filled with the everyday bustle of the ever growing West. **********SPOILERS BELOW: Zimmer also explores feminism during a time when the concept was likely foreign. His protagonist, Rose Edwards, defies all stereotypes of a pioneer woman. After burying her husband, she joins up with some friends, a gang of horse thieves that used to visit her no-good husband. That opens up her passage into the world of thieving, and during one of her rides she makes friends with some ladies at a whorehouse. Despite the stigma surrounding such a profession, Rose makes friends with them, and both she and Nora, one of her closest friends, are able to start a small cattle business. Their failure is not a result of them being women, but a result of violence and abuse of power from richer and better known individuals in the area. It was quite refreshing to read about a woman that was able to survive and be well known in an area often dominated by men. However, at times, Rose was also less emotional than a woman would normally be. It is somewhat hard to make that claim; I am not saying all women are emotional and moody, but the character that Zimmer created was either completely emotionless, or had extremely stilted, unnatural emotions. The beginning of the novel was especially so. I cry very easily, usually from reading about the character’s response to a death, etc. However, despite all the death and loss in the two or so years that I followed Rose’s life journey, each death or loss left me feeling either indifferent or just in a slight shock. Perhaps some people enjoy reading about someone who rolls with the punches. For me, it was a little too stale.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Billy

    18 FALLEN ANGELS EFFECT ON MILES CITY, MONTANA Within the book it was mentioned they went into Miles City, Montana numerous times. The first time I was in Miles City was 1963, there was Three houses of prostitution on North Main Street, all The same structure but painted differently, all placid Colors, one green, one yellow and one pink, each Employed 6 women working shifts for 24/7 coverage. At that time prostitution wAs completely legal, if a Customer became abusive he would be arrested by The City poli 18 FALLEN ANGELS EFFECT ON MILES CITY, MONTANA Within the book it was mentioned they went into Miles City, Montana numerous times. The first time I was in Miles City was 1963, there was Three houses of prostitution on North Main Street, all The same structure but painted differently, all placid Colors, one green, one yellow and one pink, each Employed 6 women working shifts for 24/7 coverage. At that time prostitution wAs completely legal, if a Customer became abusive he would be arrested by The City police. A few years later I was passing through Miles City and Was informed they had a new City Attorney that pledged To outlaw prostitution if elected, he won the election and True to his pledge closed all three houses and outlawed Prostitution within city limits. I was further informed the entire economy of the city shrunk, many Business’s went out of business due to the unforeseen Future being effected after the 18 working girls were gone. Mom & Pop stores without any connection to their red Light district failed due to lack of customers, too late they realized many traveling salesmen and like vocations Would map out their sales routes through Miles City so They could partake in the adventures of those placid Colored houses of sin. The city population was amazed when they found a large Per cent age of the cities overall annual economy was Derived from the 18 fallen angels.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carol Crigger

    We meet Rose Edwards as she’s burying her husband, though not feeling awfully sorry because he’s dead. What she’s sorry about is that, after hanging Muggy, the vigilante’s, angry after looking for gold that Muggy didn’t have, burned their house and all their belongings. She’s left with nothing but a piece of land near the Yellowstone River and a horse almost as old she is. Almost as tough, too. Thus begins a riveting tale of hardship, friendship, kinship and one-upmanship. Rose is a fascinating c We meet Rose Edwards as she’s burying her husband, though not feeling awfully sorry because he’s dead. What she’s sorry about is that, after hanging Muggy, the vigilante’s, angry after looking for gold that Muggy didn’t have, burned their house and all their belongings. She’s left with nothing but a piece of land near the Yellowstone River and a horse almost as old she is. Almost as tough, too. Thus begins a riveting tale of hardship, friendship, kinship and one-upmanship. Rose is a fascinating character. All woman, but handy and hardy as a man when it comes to work, whether digging graves, killing wolves, or herding horses. She can handle a gun just fine, as well, which serves her in good stead when she takes up with some old friends, a rather inept duo of horse thieves. None of her talents ever seem to get her very far, especially when certain factions decide she’d painted with the same brush as her husband was. This is a book you will want to keep on your shelf for a reread, particularly if you get to feeling down and out. You might decide you don’t have it so bad after all. Author Michael Zimmer’s prose immerses you in Rose Edwards’ life. The loneliness, the isolation, the hunger⏤every hardship you can think of in a Montana of sweltering heat and bone-chilling blizzard⏤and you’ll feel every one of them right along with Rose, a woman who never gives up. A wonderful story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Lee Wood

    THE RICH GET RICHER This is a sad but a normal way of life west of the Big Muddy. The powerful cattle owners association never happy until they've taken/stolen the small farmers ranches for their own. These large ranchers didn't care who they murdered as long as they got what they wanted. Hired gunhawks, regulators or stragglers. Who went around hanging these so called cattle or horse rustlers with a "T" for thieves as a warning to ALL. There's a lot of action but it's sad and it didn't have to ha THE RICH GET RICHER This is a sad but a normal way of life west of the Big Muddy. The powerful cattle owners association never happy until they've taken/stolen the small farmers ranches for their own. These large ranchers didn't care who they murdered as long as they got what they wanted. Hired gunhawks, regulators or stragglers. Who went around hanging these so called cattle or horse rustlers with a "T" for thieves as a warning to ALL. There's a lot of action but it's sad and it didn't have to happen, but that's life. ALWAYS the rich trying to get richer off poor who don't have a chance, these wealthy cattle and horse owners had their own private army of goons to do their bidding. The governors, Washington representative were all in those moguls pockets. Donations given so that the vote went to help these greedy men keep their dirty schemes and politics thriving....SOUND FAMILIAR..

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Christensen

    I love stories about independent women, and this is one of my favorites! Although nearly 500 pages long, it is a real page turner. The story takes place in 1885, when young Rose Edwards is widowed by vigilantes in Montana who hang her husband and burn her cabin in Yellowstone Valley. Penniless, she must reinvent herself, and she becomes widely known as "Rose of Yellowstone" as she battles the invading aristocracy and cattle barons of the area, and she takes a powerful stand against the oncoming I love stories about independent women, and this is one of my favorites! Although nearly 500 pages long, it is a real page turner. The story takes place in 1885, when young Rose Edwards is widowed by vigilantes in Montana who hang her husband and burn her cabin in Yellowstone Valley. Penniless, she must reinvent herself, and she becomes widely known as "Rose of Yellowstone" as she battles the invading aristocracy and cattle barons of the area, and she takes a powerful stand against the oncoming destruction of the land she loves, just the way it is. You will become well acquainted with the Old West characters she knows well. Here is a quote I particularly liked: " Well, you go ahead and look on the hind side of life, if that's your druthers. I think I'll keep my eyes all starry and full of dreams".

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard Harral

    I was distracted a lot while reading the book; however, I still loved the story. Writer spun a great story of a woman raised in a very tough time and place for women. A woman that endured living on the frontier was more than cowboy tough. I think men very often have no idea how hard it is for a woman to raise her children, put up with what her husband expects her to do, and work a job to help support the modern family. An excellent read to learn what went on after the buffalo were all but exterm I was distracted a lot while reading the book; however, I still loved the story. Writer spun a great story of a woman raised in a very tough time and place for women. A woman that endured living on the frontier was more than cowboy tough. I think men very often have no idea how hard it is for a woman to raise her children, put up with what her husband expects her to do, and work a job to help support the modern family. An excellent read to learn what went on after the buffalo were all but exterminated. What fallowed was not a picnic for Indians and most settlers. Lots of good history for the reader.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Rose, the Poacher’s daughter was so much more The first few chapters I was not finding Rose very interesting. But I suppose now that I have read the book I see it was because she hadn’t come into her full self. The history inserted into the story of western part of the country was illuminating. The characters and the life they lived was exhausting and it made me think of what would I be able to do to survive in that time. Rose was a wonderful character and I was sorry to get to the end of the boo Rose, the Poacher’s daughter was so much more The first few chapters I was not finding Rose very interesting. But I suppose now that I have read the book I see it was because she hadn’t come into her full self. The history inserted into the story of western part of the country was illuminating. The characters and the life they lived was exhausting and it made me think of what would I be able to do to survive in that time. Rose was a wonderful character and I was sorry to get to the end of the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gerald Guy

    For women to survive in the untamed western territories of 19th century America, they had to be strong of body and mind. Michael Zimmer’s Rose Edwards was that times ten. Raised by an abusive father and guided into a life of lawlessness, she took life’s knocks and got up with hardly a whimper. With a Smith & Wesson on her hip, a Merwin Hulbert strapped to her shoulder and a Sharps over her saddle, she backed down from nobody. The Poacher’s Daughter is action-packed and has a surprise ending. I l For women to survive in the untamed western territories of 19th century America, they had to be strong of body and mind. Michael Zimmer’s Rose Edwards was that times ten. Raised by an abusive father and guided into a life of lawlessness, she took life’s knocks and got up with hardly a whimper. With a Smith & Wesson on her hip, a Merwin Hulbert strapped to her shoulder and a Sharps over her saddle, she backed down from nobody. The Poacher’s Daughter is action-packed and has a surprise ending. I loved it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    hipposelect

    My first review out here, I believe...this is just about the rip-roaring-est, rootin' tootin'-est Westerm adventure that I've read in a month of Sundays. Rose is just about as intrepid a western woman as you'll ever read about, not to mention being as determined and and hard-nosed as they come. Thrown into circumstances beyond her control, she nevertheless battles with her every resource. It's a great read. My first review out here, I believe...this is just about the rip-roaring-est, rootin' tootin'-est Westerm adventure that I've read in a month of Sundays. Rose is just about as intrepid a western woman as you'll ever read about, not to mention being as determined and and hard-nosed as they come. Thrown into circumstances beyond her control, she nevertheless battles with her every resource. It's a great read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    K.

    A powerful tale of a woman's life in the West. Rose is no angel, but she's a true Western woman. She does what she must to survive, she's loyal, and she'd be the one you'd pick to defend you in a shootout. I absolutely fell in love with Zimmer's heroine, who's independent, tender, and fierce. She dares to both partner with and defy the men who surround her. I highly recommend this strong, clear, and fresh traditional Western. A powerful tale of a woman's life in the West. Rose is no angel, but she's a true Western woman. She does what she must to survive, she's loyal, and she'd be the one you'd pick to defend you in a shootout. I absolutely fell in love with Zimmer's heroine, who's independent, tender, and fierce. She dares to both partner with and defy the men who surround her. I highly recommend this strong, clear, and fresh traditional Western.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hugh T. Harrington

    Just finished my second reading of The Poacher's Daughter. I may have reviewed it before. However, this time around I find it's even better than it was the first time I read it - and, I liked it very much then. I found the plot, the characters and the weapons, clothing, horses and tack, and historical time/place all very convincing. It's an outstanding and compelling journey which I highly recommend. It may be one of the finest novels I've ever read. Just finished my second reading of The Poacher's Daughter. I may have reviewed it before. However, this time around I find it's even better than it was the first time I read it - and, I liked it very much then. I found the plot, the characters and the weapons, clothing, horses and tack, and historical time/place all very convincing. It's an outstanding and compelling journey which I highly recommend. It may be one of the finest novels I've ever read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donia

    The book is well written with great characterizations. Zimmer has a wonderful ability to convey the story of the Montana/Wyoming/Yellowstone environs and it's range wars through the earthy lovable character of Rose. It took me awhile to "warm up" to the story but when I settled back and let the history unfold it began to grow on me. If you love American frontier history and the outdoors you can't go wrong with this book . The book is well written with great characterizations. Zimmer has a wonderful ability to convey the story of the Montana/Wyoming/Yellowstone environs and it's range wars through the earthy lovable character of Rose. It took me awhile to "warm up" to the story but when I settled back and let the history unfold it began to grow on me. If you love American frontier history and the outdoors you can't go wrong with this book .

  26. 5 out of 5

    Candace Simar

    This is an excellent historical novel set in Montana. The great characters and surprising plot carried me through this long book with ease. The writing is excellent, the dialogue pitch-perfect and I felt like I had visited that time and place at the final, surprising end. I'd highly recommend it. For sure, I will be reading more of Michael Zimmer. This is an excellent historical novel set in Montana. The great characters and surprising plot carried me through this long book with ease. The writing is excellent, the dialogue pitch-perfect and I felt like I had visited that time and place at the final, surprising end. I'd highly recommend it. For sure, I will be reading more of Michael Zimmer.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karla

    I loved this epic story. This might be the first western I've read, but Jane Kirkpatrick recommended it, so I had to give it a try. Despite reading some scary parts with one eye closed, I looked forward to opening the book every night. The end felt abrupt--inferring required; this definitely needs a sequel. :-) I loved this epic story. This might be the first western I've read, but Jane Kirkpatrick recommended it, so I had to give it a try. Despite reading some scary parts with one eye closed, I looked forward to opening the book every night. The end felt abrupt--inferring required; this definitely needs a sequel. :-)

  28. 5 out of 5

    PAT EVANS

    Best in a long while I don't review books anymore unless I rate them five stars. It cuts down on the writing. I have this book five stars because of the author's efforts to describe a totally unique heroine in the grasp of the Western Evolution from frontier to the industrial revolution. Guns gallor and unremitting grit. Kinky plot that ends with lovely twist. Enjoy. Best in a long while I don't review books anymore unless I rate them five stars. It cuts down on the writing. I have this book five stars because of the author's efforts to describe a totally unique heroine in the grasp of the Western Evolution from frontier to the industrial revolution. Guns gallor and unremitting grit. Kinky plot that ends with lovely twist. Enjoy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Darl Judd

    One of my favorite books lately. Great story idea and well written. Interesting presentation of how a gunslinger reputation develops about a person who is not that. Wake up hollywood I want to see the movie, unglamorized and presented straight. 4 stars is a top rating for me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Captain Dady Mody

    From my youth, I have been interested in reading novels about the Wild West. I can with all honesty say that this was one of the best that I have ever read. While I am no authority on this subject, "The Poachers Daughter" was a book that I related to being the genuine article that significantly delved with what I would consider a great deal of authenticity of that period together with the jargon of those times. Since I enjoyed the book so very much, I would love to read more books that are writt From my youth, I have been interested in reading novels about the Wild West. I can with all honesty say that this was one of the best that I have ever read. While I am no authority on this subject, "The Poachers Daughter" was a book that I related to being the genuine article that significantly delved with what I would consider a great deal of authenticity of that period together with the jargon of those times. Since I enjoyed the book so very much, I would love to read more books that are written by Michael Zimmer. Thank you for an interesting & enjoyable read.

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