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An Early Meal - a Viking Age Cookbook & Culinary Odyssey

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A cookbook and culinary factbook A cookbook and culinary factbook based on what we know today about the Viking Age food culture. Both the recipes and the factbook part are based on finds, literary sources, other contemporary sources and experimental archaeology. In the first part of the book the authors presents the food of the Viking Age. They describe what one may have eat A cookbook and culinary factbook A cookbook and culinary factbook based on what we know today about the Viking Age food culture. Both the recipes and the factbook part are based on finds, literary sources, other contemporary sources and experimental archaeology. In the first part of the book the authors presents the food of the Viking Age. They describe what one may have eaten during the Viking Age, how the food was prepared and the practices that surrounded eating the food. This chapter is based on the yet to be finished doctoral thesis by Daniel Serra, archaeological finds from the period across Scandinavia and a range of various other sources. The second part is a cookbook presented as a journey through Viking Age Scandinavia with 42 different recipes divided into seven geographical areas. The recipes are based upon archaeological finds and experimental archaeology bound together by the combined archaeological and culinary expertise of Daniel Serra and Hanna Tunberg. Almost all dishes can be cooked just as easily in the kitchen as out in a re-enactors camp. In addition to the background material and the actual cookbook, there are some very interesting appendixes. Not only do we include an Encyclopedic part, which act as a quick reference guide to both food and cooking equipment, there will also be a list of plant finds and a reference for translation of plants, fish birds and other ingredients between English, Latin, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian and German.


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A cookbook and culinary factbook A cookbook and culinary factbook based on what we know today about the Viking Age food culture. Both the recipes and the factbook part are based on finds, literary sources, other contemporary sources and experimental archaeology. In the first part of the book the authors presents the food of the Viking Age. They describe what one may have eat A cookbook and culinary factbook A cookbook and culinary factbook based on what we know today about the Viking Age food culture. Both the recipes and the factbook part are based on finds, literary sources, other contemporary sources and experimental archaeology. In the first part of the book the authors presents the food of the Viking Age. They describe what one may have eaten during the Viking Age, how the food was prepared and the practices that surrounded eating the food. This chapter is based on the yet to be finished doctoral thesis by Daniel Serra, archaeological finds from the period across Scandinavia and a range of various other sources. The second part is a cookbook presented as a journey through Viking Age Scandinavia with 42 different recipes divided into seven geographical areas. The recipes are based upon archaeological finds and experimental archaeology bound together by the combined archaeological and culinary expertise of Daniel Serra and Hanna Tunberg. Almost all dishes can be cooked just as easily in the kitchen as out in a re-enactors camp. In addition to the background material and the actual cookbook, there are some very interesting appendixes. Not only do we include an Encyclopedic part, which act as a quick reference guide to both food and cooking equipment, there will also be a list of plant finds and a reference for translation of plants, fish birds and other ingredients between English, Latin, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian and German.

30 review for An Early Meal - a Viking Age Cookbook & Culinary Odyssey

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    squeeeeeee!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott Frank

    This is a great, great book. It successfully combines an archaeological review of food-related finds at Norse sites with experimental archaeology and a cook book; and it blends those together very well. Sure, there are lots of recipes - presumably why most people would buy this book, since it is marked as a "cookbook", but it also contains an excellent survey of viking-era cooking methods, foodstuffs, and sometimes even ritual preparations, all based on archaeological finds at each of the sites m This is a great, great book. It successfully combines an archaeological review of food-related finds at Norse sites with experimental archaeology and a cook book; and it blends those together very well. Sure, there are lots of recipes - presumably why most people would buy this book, since it is marked as a "cookbook", but it also contains an excellent survey of viking-era cooking methods, foodstuffs, and sometimes even ritual preparations, all based on archaeological finds at each of the sites mentioned (which are, in fact, even cited at the back). My single quibble is the lack of a single Icelandic site as one of the ones they selected - we get one in England, two in Norway, two in Denmark, and two in Sweden. The ecological and sociological conditions in Iceland, and given how they differed from most of the rest of the Norse world, it would probably be an interesting comparison to the other sites (as opposed to say, two in Sweden that are just a couple hundred kilometers apart) But that's the barest of quibbles - an impressive book, with impressive research, well distilled into useful (mostly - some of us don't have cauldrons) recipes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    I have a rather esoteric interest in food history, so I found this book really interesting. It is as much a history book as it is a cookbook, though it mostly covers food history with the relevant bits of actual history for context. It's well-written and organized, and offers helpful appendices in the back, complete with conversion charts for those who want to attempt the recipes. The recipes themselves are not actual recipes from the viking age as those don't exist, but they are the authors' be I have a rather esoteric interest in food history, so I found this book really interesting. It is as much a history book as it is a cookbook, though it mostly covers food history with the relevant bits of actual history for context. It's well-written and organized, and offers helpful appendices in the back, complete with conversion charts for those who want to attempt the recipes. The recipes themselves are not actual recipes from the viking age as those don't exist, but they are the authors' best guesses at what kind of recipes would have been used back then, based on archeological context and other knowledge. As such, they are not fancy recipes that are very involved, many are quite plain. I personally feel they would not be all that tasty. You'd probably use these recipes only when you want as close to historically accurate food as possible for re-enactments, parties, curiosity, etc. To their credit, they do give directions for cooking both in conventional ovens and "in the field". Anyway, the book itself is very well made and the pages are thick and high quality.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dymphy

    "An early meal" is a cookbook detailing recipes by findplace (York, Hereby, etc), adapted for the modern times. The book starts by sketching a context in which to read the recipes. It also explains why some recipes are included and why others are not (e.g. due to some fish becoming extinct). The recipes include instructions on how to recreate a dish when you don't have that spit handy. There are some conventional dishes, but also some what more exotic ones (heart on a spit) or "novel to me", suc "An early meal" is a cookbook detailing recipes by findplace (York, Hereby, etc), adapted for the modern times. The book starts by sketching a context in which to read the recipes. It also explains why some recipes are included and why others are not (e.g. due to some fish becoming extinct). The recipes include instructions on how to recreate a dish when you don't have that spit handy. There are some conventional dishes, but also some what more exotic ones (heart on a spit) or "novel to me", such as peas in a bag. The photographs are gorgeous, yet clean. This book really tempts me to run to the nearest grocery market and to go and buy the ingredients and start cooking.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Ideiosepius

    This book is deftly presented as a ‘voyage’ inspired by two 9th century interviews with traders. The reader is taken along on the travels of a trading expedition to seven known Viking era trading centres. Each of the destinations is presented at the beginning of it’s chapter and the authors use this introduction to the locations to present regional and seasonal food variations as well as exploring the local, archaeological sites, the finds and what they imply about the ways different communities This book is deftly presented as a ‘voyage’ inspired by two 9th century interviews with traders. The reader is taken along on the travels of a trading expedition to seven known Viking era trading centres. Each of the destinations is presented at the beginning of it’s chapter and the authors use this introduction to the locations to present regional and seasonal food variations as well as exploring the local, archaeological sites, the finds and what they imply about the ways different communities must have dealt with food supply issues. This book is the result of the many years practical ‘period’ cooking and food preparation by two authors. The first thirty two pages present the background to the early meal; what they ate, how they prepared it, feasting occasions and so forth. Neatly presented, with lovely illustrations, one can read this first section quite swiftly. So unless one has ever tried to research such things themselves one might overlook the vast amount of research and knowledge that has gone into the writing of these modestly presented, matter of fact pages. I have been trying to re-create and research the cooking of the era for a couple of years now and am sure that anyone with any interest in the historical period will find this section invaluable. The bulk of the book is course, recipes. They have been developed through the authors’ involvement in experimental cooking which utilised old written sources and archaeological finds to make practical recipes for feasts and demonstrations. As such these recipes are very practical, they often also give different cooking instructions to cover both modern kitchens and living history cooking conditions. Some of the recipes will not be attractive to most modern tastebuds, but everyone should be able to find at least one meal to bond with. I have only tried one recipe so far and it worked well, titbits of information are scattered through all the recipes, making them great fun to read even if you are not intending to attempt all the recipes therein. To be honest I am not sure how I would go with such a delicacy as Pickled Kale Lamb, however the Rose Hip Mead has me salivating every time I read it and one day I would really like to attempt the Spit-Roasted Heart

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sidsel Pedersen

    While the other recipe books I have for the Viking age tend to play a bit fast and loose with the accuracy of the food, this book is all about being as authentic as can be. The introduction is excellent and gives great insights into what and how the Vikings ate as well as how we know. The recipe part so far is interesting... and some of it I even want to try to eat. The book is well written, though a bit repetitive, if you read the introduction to a site and then the explanation of a dish, they While the other recipe books I have for the Viking age tend to play a bit fast and loose with the accuracy of the food, this book is all about being as authentic as can be. The introduction is excellent and gives great insights into what and how the Vikings ate as well as how we know. The recipe part so far is interesting... and some of it I even want to try to eat. The book is well written, though a bit repetitive, if you read the introduction to a site and then the explanation of a dish, they do tend to go over the same stuff twice. But I am not sure the book are meant to be read cover to cover, as I just did. There are a lot of really good information and it is definitely a book I will use as a reference book in the future. Read my full review: http://wp.me/p40HVI-Fq

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Galvin

  8. 5 out of 5

    Indrė Kazakevičiūtė

  9. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cydric Gagnon

  11. 5 out of 5

    Astrid Charters

  12. 5 out of 5

    Celia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christine Frost

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Jenks

  15. 5 out of 5

    T. Patrick

  16. 4 out of 5

    Russell Jaques

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ingver

  19. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bev Azizi

  21. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnn Montemayor

  22. 4 out of 5

    Regan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Petr Kotas

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janet Anderson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leslee Gill

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kari

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aenyell

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeremias

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ragnvald Raddatz

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan W

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