Hot Best Seller

The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia

Availability: Ready to download

Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than ten years and has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely book, he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, th Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than ten years and has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely book, he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, the secrets of their success, and, most intriguing of all, what they think of one another. Why are the Danes so happy despite having the highest taxes? Do the Finns really have the best education system? Are the Icelanders as feral as they sometimes appear? How are the Norwegians spending their fantastic oil wealth? And why do all of them hate the Swedes? In The Almost Nearly Perfect People, Booth explains who the Scandinavians are, how they differ and why, and what their quirks and foibles are, and he explores why these societies have become so successful and models for the world. Along the way, a more nuanced, often darker picture emerges of a region plagued by taboos, characterized by suffocating parochialism, and populated by extremists of various shades.


Compare

Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than ten years and has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely book, he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, th Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than ten years and has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely book, he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, the secrets of their success, and, most intriguing of all, what they think of one another. Why are the Danes so happy despite having the highest taxes? Do the Finns really have the best education system? Are the Icelanders as feral as they sometimes appear? How are the Norwegians spending their fantastic oil wealth? And why do all of them hate the Swedes? In The Almost Nearly Perfect People, Booth explains who the Scandinavians are, how they differ and why, and what their quirks and foibles are, and he explores why these societies have become so successful and models for the world. Along the way, a more nuanced, often darker picture emerges of a region plagued by taboos, characterized by suffocating parochialism, and populated by extremists of various shades.

30 review for The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    This is a book about Scandinavia - judged time and time again by various polls to be the happiest and most satisfying place to live in the world. Yet we British ignore it. I came to this book with high levels of ignorance.... It made me realise how much we look south - towards France, Italy, Spain and Greece. We want sunshine and olives, and Mediterranean waves lapping at our feet. We don't give a hoot about the northern lands, and their strange cold habits. Well, more fool us. This book is fascin This is a book about Scandinavia - judged time and time again by various polls to be the happiest and most satisfying place to live in the world. Yet we British ignore it. I came to this book with high levels of ignorance.... It made me realise how much we look south - towards France, Italy, Spain and Greece. We want sunshine and olives, and Mediterranean waves lapping at our feet. We don't give a hoot about the northern lands, and their strange cold habits. Well, more fool us. This book is fascinating voyage through Nordic history, culture and psychology, and I am going to award it a full five stars. The author writes very amusingly, and that adds great charm to his observations. He is a British journalist and his wife is Danish. He spent several years living in Denmark, and has obviously travelled around Scandinavia extensively. But he has also done his research, and the book is far from being purely anecdotal. There are a lot of references to surveys done by various respectable bodies. One of my GR friends was critical of this book, describing the author as xenophobic. Yes, he is pretty rude. But I see this as a reflection of his personality, rather than an indictment of the people he describes. He's a glass half full sort of chap, with a dry sense of humour - so his way of seeing is bound to be rather jaded. I found it easy to see beyond some of his negative observations and evaluate the Scandinavians in my own terms - and much of that was positive. All in all I found the author incredibly readable, and because so much of this book was completely new to me, I found it utterly fascinating. I shall end with a few of the compliments that are given to Scandinavia by the rest of the world. Most of us are familiar with these Nordic labels, but the book explores them in ways that are extremely interesting - and there were lots of surprises, or at least there were for me. Peaceful Tolerant Happy Contented Egalitarian Progressive Prosperous Modern Liberal Best educated Technologically advanced Ambitious environmental policies Generously funded welfare state systems. Put down your bowl of taggiasca olives, and put aside your glass of sun-warmed Cabernet Sauvignon, it is definitely time to explore these amazing countries of the chilly north. This book makes the perfect introduction - it's a marvellously entertaining read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This is my new favorite book, and I'm excited to start pestering others to read it. The Almost Nearly Perfect People is my idea of a perfect read, with its elements of travelogue, history, anthropological and sociological observations, all peppered with British humor. A blurb quote on my copy described it as "Bill Bryson goes to Scandinavia," which is a good description. Michael Booth is a British journalist who lives in Denmark. One day he saw a story in the newspaper about the Danes being ranked This is my new favorite book, and I'm excited to start pestering others to read it. The Almost Nearly Perfect People is my idea of a perfect read, with its elements of travelogue, history, anthropological and sociological observations, all peppered with British humor. A blurb quote on my copy described it as "Bill Bryson goes to Scandinavia," which is a good description. Michael Booth is a British journalist who lives in Denmark. One day he saw a story in the newspaper about the Danes being ranked as the happiest people in the world, and he was puzzled. "Well, they are doing an awfully good job of hiding it ... They don't seem all that frisky to me." So Booth starts doing research and discovers that the Scandinavian countries have some rather appealing myths associated with them, such as being considered among the most peaceful, well-educated, prosperous, progressive and egalitarian people in the world. He visits and writes about five countries: Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden. The result is a delicious blend of fascinating research and amusing stories. I listened to this on audio, and I frequently laughed out loud at Booth's wit. Some of my favorite stories were when Booth visited a Finnish sauna, when he tried to understand the Danes' enthusiasm for their flag, when he witnessed a Norwegian parade, when he experienced the interconnectedness of Iceland, and when he tried to get Swedes to be more polite. He also includes some traditional jokes about each place, to see how the countries poke fun at each other. There is so much great stuff in this book that it feels impossible to do it justice in a summary. I thought it was a delight from start to finish. Highly recommended. Hat tip to Goodreader Caroline, whose excellent review prompted me to check out this wonderful book. Favorite Quotes "I feel a bit of a heel being critical about the kind, good-natured gentle folk who attended the choir week in Tønder. It is easy to mock their Gary Larson aestethic (sandals with socks, cutoff denim shorts with their shirts tucked in, and so on) and their Ned Flanders sensibilities. In truth, a more contended, kind, honest, community-minded group of people you could never hope to meet. The problem was that, for a cynical misanthrope such as myself, folkelig [folksiness] has much the safe effect as Kryptonite on Superman, or water on the Wicked Witch of the West. I become weak and confused, and begin to question who I am. Prolonged exposure to folkelig undoes me, smothers me, suffocates me." "I was losing enthusiasm for my groundbreaking anthropological research. Trying to get the Swedes to be more polite was like picking on Italian men for being vain, or Japanese women for being shy. The poor creatures could not help themselves, and besides, what had the Swedes ever done to me?" "When faced with the happiest, most trusting, and successful people on the planet, one's natural instinct is to try to find fault, to X-ray the fissures. It is an instinct I may not have been entirely successful in resisting over the course of this book, but I hope that any Nordic people who might read it will forgive me. Put it down to envy, if that helps." "The fissures and flaws are definitely there, though. This region has its own set of problems and challenges, weird personality kinds and frailties, just like the rest of us. But ultimately its success is still hard to argue with. As Paul McCartney once said when a journalist suggested that The White Album might have been better as just one disc instead of two: "Yeah, well, you know, it is still The White Album." Of course there are downsides even in almost nearly perfect societies: there are historical skeletons in every closet, and yes, countries with homogenous, monocultural tendencies do tend to be a little too safe and dull, and insular. Looking to the future, the Nordic countries are also facing some serious challenges — aging populations, creaking welfare states, the ongoing integration of immigrant populations, and rising inequality. But it's still Scandinavia. It is still the enviably rich, peaceful, harmonious, and progressive place it has long been. It's still The White Album.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Esil

    I listened to the audio of The Almost Nearly Perfect People. It was entertaining, interesting and thought provoking. Michael Booth is a Brit who has moved to Denmark, as his wife wanted to return to her home country. From this vantage point, Booth sets out to write a book about the people of Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden, and to explore what makes their lives different, better, worse and odd, compared to each other and especially compared to the rest of the world. His starting poi I listened to the audio of The Almost Nearly Perfect People. It was entertaining, interesting and thought provoking. Michael Booth is a Brit who has moved to Denmark, as his wife wanted to return to her home country. From this vantage point, Booth sets out to write a book about the people of Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden, and to explore what makes their lives different, better, worse and odd, compared to each other and especially compared to the rest of the world. His starting point are statistics suggesting that the people of Denmark are happier than people anywhere else in the world. He provides some historical context and anecdotes, recounts his own experiences and reports on interviews with experts and ordinary people. (I became quite a bore at the dinner table at my house for a few weeks as I recounted some of these interesting tidbits of information.) He packages the whole thing with a lot of humour, some self-deprecation, many strong opinions, many impressionistic reactions and very little objectivity. The narrator of the audio has a great spirited British accent which brings a lot of life to the whole experience. Booth doesn’t set out to bust the myth that these Nordic countries make for a peaceful stable life, but he digs a bit deeper and theorizes about some of the causes and effects of these strong social democratic countries. He highlights the tension between the benefits of economic and social stability and the inevitable consequential sameness and conventionality. He takes offence at the taxation rates, but recognizes that these are countries with extraordinary school systems and social safety nets. He dwells on the equality between the sexes and the smaller spread between rich and poor, but recognizes that these countries face real challenges when it comes to recent immigration movements. Notably, he is fearless when it comes to making generalizations and pointing out some of the deficiencies or down sides to the countries and cultures he depicts. There’s a bit of a nudge-nudge-wink-wink quality to some of what recounts – look at how absurdly modest the Danes are, how can anyone stand paying such high taxes, what’s with waiting for a green light to cross a street when there’s no car in sight, look at the obedient Swedes swiftly eliminating their gender pronouns in the name of gender equality, etc... He’s not entirely critical of the underlying values, but gently mocking the reality that comes with some of these values. Which for a Canadian listener makes for an interesting experience because in many ways what Booth describes is not that different from our Canadian reality. So while his book was entertaining and interesting, it also provoked me to think of some of what I take for granted, to try to see it from an outside perspective. Although, really, in the end, I still quite like where I live. Which is in fact Booth’s starting point, namely what makes the people of northern Europe generally content with their lot in life. Don’t listen to The Almost Nearly Perfect People if you’re looking for a serious well researched book about the northern European countries. Do listen to it if you’re looking for an entertaining thought provoking book about what makes for a good place to live.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Terje Enge

    I am a Scandinavian who was based in Norway for more than sixty years, this book shows that I'm not even close to perfect. But this book is: It is good written, it is funny and it even gave a Norwegian new insight(!). It is both a critique and hymn to the supposedly the happiest, most trusting and successfull people on this planet. I always loved Denmark, I even planned to move to Copenhagen once upon a time. After having read this book I'm glad I didn't. I learned that the Norwegians are even more I am a Scandinavian who was based in Norway for more than sixty years, this book shows that I'm not even close to perfect. But this book is: It is good written, it is funny and it even gave a Norwegian new insight(!). It is both a critique and hymn to the supposedly the happiest, most trusting and successfull people on this planet. I always loved Denmark, I even planned to move to Copenhagen once upon a time. After having read this book I'm glad I didn't. I learned that the Norwegians are even more Danish than the Danes. We have the Jantelov, the koselige, the folkelige and the same social cohesion, but mixed with the Swedes respect for ordning. The chapters on Denmark are clearly the best, the author is a brit who lives in Denmark with wife and children. The chapters on Norway are not as good, but that may be because I already know the Norwegians pretty well. The chaperts on the Finns - the Über-Scandinavians - brought new insight, but that may be because the Finns never really were considered part of our Nordic Family here in the heartland of Scandinavia. If you plan to stay in Scandinavia this book is a must-read. It may tempt you to stay for a long time. If you are a Scandinavian you should read it too, but it may make you want to leave. I did …

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gini

    I really wanted this book to be good. And I am SO mad that it was terrible! Ugh. This is exactly the topic that I want to read about--why do we have this pervasive envy of all things Scandinavian? Is it deserved? What are the Scandinavian countries really like, are they really paradise on earth? What aren't we seeing through our worship of them? This book looks like it will answer these questions, but it answers none. It is a poorly written blog post of a book. "Here is a personal anecdote about the I really wanted this book to be good. And I am SO mad that it was terrible! Ugh. This is exactly the topic that I want to read about--why do we have this pervasive envy of all things Scandinavian? Is it deserved? What are the Scandinavian countries really like, are they really paradise on earth? What aren't we seeing through our worship of them? This book looks like it will answer these questions, but it answers none. It is a poorly written blog post of a book. "Here is a personal anecdote about these people I met. Then I talked to his expert. He didn't cite any facts, just said some platitudes. Is this something meaningful?!? MAYBE!" Social science books are either fantastic or really, really bad. This is in the really bad category.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    "I'm from Norway/Sweden/Denmark/Iceland/Finland, don't you know WHERE THAT IS?" *Cue offended eye rolling* Yes, we're all been there. At some point in our lives we all learned a valuable lesson, even some Europeans don't know where our countries are situated. If you're from any of the Nordic countries, you'll most likely have been asked one or more of the following questions more than once: 1. Norway? Isn't that the capital of Sweden? 2. All Swedes are blond, so why is your hair brown? 3. Denmark? O "I'm from Norway/Sweden/Denmark/Iceland/Finland, don't you know WHERE THAT IS?" *Cue offended eye rolling* Yes, we're all been there. At some point in our lives we all learned a valuable lesson, even some Europeans don't know where our countries are situated. If you're from any of the Nordic countries, you'll most likely have been asked one or more of the following questions more than once: 1. Norway? Isn't that the capital of Sweden? 2. All Swedes are blond, so why is your hair brown? 3. Denmark? Oh, so you speak Dutch, right? 4. Aren't you afraid of polar bears when you go outside? That's right, my fellow Nordics, and blissfully ignorant outsiders, people have no idea where we live - or than Scandinavia actually consists of 3 countries (Norway, Sweden, Denmark) while "Norden" (the "North")includes Iceland and Finland. Don't believe me? Well, take a look at these answers. People from an undisclosed country (mwahaha) were asked to place European countries on a map. Notice how many got at least a few countries right, but most failed to name any Nordic countries correctly. And why should they? We're a speck of dust in the grand scheme of things... Oh well, c'est la vie. Or as we would say: "Sånn er livet..." Fun challenge: Try to see if you're able to spot the one map where Norway was placed correctly & tell me in the comments section;-) Now, if you' re interested in moving past the stereotypes, this book is a fun place to start. Especially if your main interest is Denmark. There's no denying this book covers Denmark better than the other countries combined. The author, a Brit, has been living there for decades. It's anechdotal for the most part, interspersed with humorous observations that will make those who know us, nod their heads in agreement. Warning! A tiny rant coming your way: As a Norwegian, I would have liked to see him focus a little more on Norway in general, and not dedicate 50% of his Norwegian chapters to Anders Behring Breivik. (The mentally unstable, xenophobic guy who blew up the government buildings and shot 65 innocent teenagers back in 2011, just because he didn't like their political views. Yes, it made an impact, but I would like to think that it's not that one incident that defines us a people. BTW: Did you get Norway right? Here's the cheat sheet: (view spoiler)[ Picture #6 from the top got all the Scandinavian countries righ! Congratulations! (hide spoiler)] If you, after having read the book, decide to come visit us, please remember the following: 1. Yes, it IS expensive, you'll have to dig deep into your savings account. 2. Sorry to disappoint you, there are absolutely no polar bears walking around in the streets in Scaninavia. If the beautiful white bears are your "thing", you'll have to go to the tiny island of Svalbard, north of the Arctic circle to see them in their dwindling natural habitat. Or better yet, travel to Greenland. Or... you guessed it; book a flight to the Arctic - waaaaay up north. 3. Also, please remember that the midnight sun is not a second sun only Scandinavians can see. It's the same sun that shines down on you every day, except in the northern parts of Scandinavia, it doesn't set in the summer. Winter? Less sun, more Northern Lights, but only if you travel to the northern half of the Scandinavia peninsula - or to the mythical saga island (a.k.a. Iceland) in the middle of the Atlantic. Bon voyage... Or: happy reading! Oh, and one more thing, before you go: If you would like to know more about us Nordics, I can absolutely recommend Humon and her Scandinavia and the World comics. They are educational and hilarious: You can find her here: http://satwcomic.com

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Having never been to any Scandinavian country myself (my grandmother went to Sweden, Norway and Denmark a few years before she died and gave me a bunch of souvenirs) I can't say I really know much about what it's like to be Scandinavian, but my view is, like most North Americans who've never been to a Scandinavian country, somewhat tainted by the media. We hear it's a utopia. We hear that in Sweden they've rejected consumerism and capitalism and kick-started the minimalist lifestyle. We hear in Having never been to any Scandinavian country myself (my grandmother went to Sweden, Norway and Denmark a few years before she died and gave me a bunch of souvenirs) I can't say I really know much about what it's like to be Scandinavian, but my view is, like most North Americans who've never been to a Scandinavian country, somewhat tainted by the media. We hear it's a utopia. We hear that in Sweden they've rejected consumerism and capitalism and kick-started the minimalist lifestyle. We hear in Sweden that they've got genderless schools where your child will be referred to as "hen" and given gender-neutral picture books and toys. We hear how in Iceland (which is actually Nordic but people often mix these countries up into the same general thing) they've almost eradicated down syndrome (which to me is not utopic but rather a sugarcoated form of eugenics), that Scandinavian countries have settled on controversies that we poor ignorant suckers still debate over today (assisted suicide, climate change, child-raising) and we all love our copies of My Struggle, Let the Right One In and of course our dusty 1980's ABBA on vinyl (but in all fairness, who doesn't like ABBA?). We all love our well-worn DVD's of Lars Von Trier's Riget and would swear to god that it's much more intellectually superior to Stephen King's Kingdom Hospital adaptation (I liked Kingdom Hospital better, I'm ignorant!) and my little brother's generation here in Canada hasn't been totally safe from the fear that came with the 2011 attacks perpetrated by Anders Behring Breivik. I used to pester my mother to buy me a toy Dalecarlian horse for Christmas when I was a kid, and thought it looked much prettier than a My Little Pony. The one guy in my class here at Dal who is from Sweden loves a good Wal-Mart sale as much as the next guy, fixates on vintage cars and constantly takes pictures with his cell phone. I think at times that North America's obsession with Scandinavian countries as the most progressive and utopic ones often give people a generalized view of anybody who actually lives there. We forget that like the rest of us, they're human beings with their own opinions and habits that may not necessarily conform with a collective ideal. In Michael Booth's The Almost Nearly Perfect People, he discusses how he perceives the happiness of these countries from his own subjective standpoint, and his words are surprising and interesting. He doesn't hate on, mock or try to tear down any country's people or societal culture. Instead he finds that in many ways all the rumored peace and progression is actually true in every respect, and with both statistics and his own subjective opinions, Booth explores the balance of both bad and good - high taxes suck, but cheaper school tuition is a godsend for any student who wants to achieve their dreams. While immigration and refugee influxes remain a pressing controversy, gender equality and economic fairness somehow remain more or less stable. One intriguing yet rather sad thing underlying in Booth's writing is the loss of individuality and the unspoken realities which come with trying to eliminate gender pronouns, conspicuous consumption and disobedience. It had me recalling an essay for school I read about three months back in the New York Times - Karl Ove Knausgaard's "I Am Someone, Look At Me" - and his poignant reflection on 1970's Scandinavian culture sacrificing the individual for the sake of collective modesty. Now, surely that's not entirely true today. I think it's safe to say that a Danish high schooler or a Norwegian high schooler can wear what they want, read/listen to what they want and think what they want just like any US or Canadian high school student can, but still I do find it interesting that Booth's more recent book looks at the same repression of individuality for the sake of the collective that Knausgaard's essay covers. If anything, The Almost Nearly Perfect People made me want to hold onto my individuality and misplaced nostalgia for the "greed is good" 1980's era even more than ever before. I'm not sure why that is. Maybe it's because here in Canada and in the US in many ways Scandinavian culture is fetishized into this perfect lifestyle for well-to-do hipsters and yuppies, and I don't like that it's all based on some stereotype about a culture that is little-understood. I don't like that it sacrifices sentiment for material items for the sake of bragging rights and holier-than-thou attitudes when really that's not even what Scandinavian culture is all about. I do find it interesting that this book, written by an "outsider" (Booth was originally British), captures so much so well yet still only just scratches the surface of something much deeper. Much of his book is focused on Denmark, probably because he himself lived there, but Booth does branch out to other locations and explores not only the differences between them that outsiders aren't always aware of, and also the pretentiousness that more often than not is coming from people who don't actually live there but who fantasize about it. *I apologize if in my review I've mixed up some country locations. I don't mean to be offensive, but having never been to Europe and knowing very little about its geography beyond the United Kingdom, what I do know of much of northern Europe is limited at best.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Henna Pääkkönen

    I am still laughing out loud here, having just finished this book. As a typical Finn, i enjoyed reading about how a foreigner sees my fellow countrymen, as well as having a good laugh about it, but this book was in fact much more. It is an insight into the Nordics (country by country) by an Englishman who has lived 10+ years in Denmark and set on a mission across the Nordics to understand these societies... The book is hilarious, and drills into the national stereotypes, jokes about them and tries I am still laughing out loud here, having just finished this book. As a typical Finn, i enjoyed reading about how a foreigner sees my fellow countrymen, as well as having a good laugh about it, but this book was in fact much more. It is an insight into the Nordics (country by country) by an Englishman who has lived 10+ years in Denmark and set on a mission across the Nordics to understand these societies... The book is hilarious, and drills into the national stereotypes, jokes about them and tries to analyse the background of why the people and the countries are as they are....Personally, i did miss more facts and history, but i do understand that this was not meant to be a historic account of Scandinavia, but rather a lighter more "anthropological" analysis maybe...and as such it was just great! I recommend this as a light reading for anyone wanting to destress and to learn a bit about the Scandinavian society and the differing mentalities and cultures across the Nordics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Davis

    A set of observations on each of the Scandinavian countries, including Iceland by a journalist married to Danish woman. An interesting as a personal view or set of observations but without much background in history or sociology. A bit pedestrian, especially that some of the views are strictly personal without too much support in facts or wider analysis. Still managed to get through 80% of the text but run out of patience when reading about Sweden - the last country discussed. Apart from Malmo a A set of observations on each of the Scandinavian countries, including Iceland by a journalist married to Danish woman. An interesting as a personal view or set of observations but without much background in history or sociology. A bit pedestrian, especially that some of the views are strictly personal without too much support in facts or wider analysis. Still managed to get through 80% of the text but run out of patience when reading about Sweden - the last country discussed. Apart from Malmo and Stockholm hardly anything more mentioned about the country. Too many generalities and too much from a point of view Thatcherite follower.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is an absolutely engrossing look at the people and societies that make up the Nordic countries. I should probably come clean and admit that I have a deep fondness for this part of the world, a fondness that in the case of Finland probably extends into pure adulation. I have spent happy times in the various countries, love the films, avidly read the books and cheer on the sportsmen. If the whole place wasn't so very expensive to visit, and if speaking/hearing the languages didn't so often gi This is an absolutely engrossing look at the people and societies that make up the Nordic countries. I should probably come clean and admit that I have a deep fondness for this part of the world, a fondness that in the case of Finland probably extends into pure adulation. I have spent happy times in the various countries, love the films, avidly read the books and cheer on the sportsmen. If the whole place wasn't so very expensive to visit, and if speaking/hearing the languages didn't so often give me the giggles I would happily move to any of the capitals or even the more rural and out of the way areas, Gotland is lovely for example. If you feel the same, or in fact if you find yourself interacting with Nordic people on anything like a regular basis, then this is the book that you really have to read. It is a fascinating, funny and at times critical look at how the Nordic people view themselves and each other. As well as how they choose to present themselves to outsiders. The writing style is lighthearted but informative and intelligent in the same way as Bill Bryson or Simon Winder, and the book is a delight to read. My one criticism is that it does seem to focus a little heavily on Denmark, while Iceland is given only a very small section, but this is understandable due to the author's being based in Denmark, married to a Dane and Iceland being such a tiny country from a socio-political standpoint.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    An interesting tour through the five Nordic countries of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden. Only Denmark, Norway, and Sweden are technically "Scandinavian" and they're thick as thieves if you consider their history (which none of us has, truth be told). Michael Booth goes with the winsome tone of a happy-go-lucky, sometimes wise-guy traveler. His topics are odd ones at times. For instance, in Denmark there's a chapter called "Hot Tub Sandwiches," in Iceland, one called "Elves" (yes, m An interesting tour through the five Nordic countries of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden. Only Denmark, Norway, and Sweden are technically "Scandinavian" and they're thick as thieves if you consider their history (which none of us has, truth be told). Michael Booth goes with the winsome tone of a happy-go-lucky, sometimes wise-guy traveler. His topics are odd ones at times. For instance, in Denmark there's a chapter called "Hot Tub Sandwiches," in Iceland, one called "Elves" (yes, many there believe in them), in Norway we have "Bananas" (the Swedes peel them, don't you know), in Finland he offers "Santa," and in the wrap-up, Sweden, you'll read "Somali Pizza." Quirky, eh? Booth himself is a Brit married to a Dane so Denmark, as lead-off batter, gets the most press (115 pp.). Booth knows the Danes best and they are considered the most fun of the lot, perhaps because of geography. Oddly, the most "Viking-like" goes to those crazy Icelanders. (Anyone want to buy a bank?) The Norwegians have become inebriated by oil (though I wonder how the depressed market's hitting them?) and Finlandia is the country Booth likes best. Maybe it was the naked public saunas that did it. Or the macho men who made fun of Swedish males and how wimpy they are in their hairnets. Speaking of, Kingpin Sweden comes off the worst here, like a totalitarian state, socialist-style. That said, it remains the best place to be a woman because it is feminism run amok. Did you know that if you hold a door for a lady in Sweden, you're likely to get an icy "how dare you" stare? And that it has the best damned parental leave laws in the world (Daddies included)? Yeppers. Making babies? In Sweden, live as a yogurt culture! Chivalry? Dead as herring. At least in Sweden. Read a little, learn a little. A bit random, and it jumps around a lot, too, but certainly you come out of it deprived of all your stereotypes, and that's always a victory, no?

  12. 4 out of 5

    zachary

    Michael Booth is a British journalist living in Denmark and he's determined to figure out what makes the Scandinavians so special. What is a myth and what is truth? Is anything true? Is anything a myth? Moore takes it upon himself to solve the mysteries of the North; heading out to an adventure that takes him from offices of politicians to Santa Claus' home in the middle of summer. As someone who is Scandinavian, this book definitely appealed to me because... well, it's always nice to see how fol Michael Booth is a British journalist living in Denmark and he's determined to figure out what makes the Scandinavians so special. What is a myth and what is truth? Is anything true? Is anything a myth? Moore takes it upon himself to solve the mysteries of the North; heading out to an adventure that takes him from offices of politicians to Santa Claus' home in the middle of summer. As someone who is Scandinavian, this book definitely appealed to me because... well, it's always nice to see how folks around the world view us. Even though there's a lot of popular stereotypes and a lot of famous brands (IKEA for one) with a Scandinavian origin... nobody seems to know much about Scandinavia. In their defense, I doubt any of them would give good answers if you asked them about West Africa or Southeast Asia either. But as someone born and raised here, curiousity definitely got the better part of me. I had to read this book, I just had to. Booth's writing is witty and intriguing; it's hard not to like the guy, honestly. He has a lot of interesting views and stories to share but at the same time, I do feel like the book falls quite short. It's more a personal reflective story that doesn't really say much. It would've done just as good as a blog post titled ”This is what I, a Brit in Denmark, think about Norway” and so on. I feel as if it isn't sure wether to be just humor or actually educating – it ends up somewhere inbetween with lots of interesting quotes and facts only to have them lead to no interesting discussions or debates about the matter. I don't mind a balance between humor and education; but this book fails to find that balance. None the less, it was an interesting read. Especially about the other countries; I compared his experiences a lot with my own. Some alike, some not so much. Reading about Sweden in particular was weird because he brought up a lot of stuff I did know and a lot of stuff I didn't know. It felt kind of weird to find out stereotypes like that. I feel like I'm supposed to know them already. I can't tell if this realisation is positive or negative in terms of being a proper Sweden, but... I had my share of chuckles but it was hardly ever more than that and I found myself struggling through the book more than once, sadly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sara Sather

    I abandoned this book because it seems the author's point of view was negatively established prior to writing it. Dude doesn't dig the Scandinavian way of life, and that seemed like the thesis statement for the book. If I wanted to read someone's complaints and twisted judgements, I'd find some right wing blog.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mina Soare

    The narrator is by turns startled, amazed and britishly shocked as he recounts his Mr. Bean-like antics in the Nordic countries. If culture be expressed and passed on through stories, as a journalist, Michael Booth strikes a good balance between analysis and anecdotes. The narrator offers a general, simple (perhaps simplistic) bird's-eye view of Nordic cultures, as well as an accessible take on thorny issues from many perspectives. Alas, this is how I imagine people felt when they learned there w The narrator is by turns startled, amazed and britishly shocked as he recounts his Mr. Bean-like antics in the Nordic countries. If culture be expressed and passed on through stories, as a journalist, Michael Booth strikes a good balance between analysis and anecdotes. The narrator offers a general, simple (perhaps simplistic) bird's-eye view of Nordic cultures, as well as an accessible take on thorny issues from many perspectives. Alas, this is how I imagine people felt when they learned there was no Santa Claus. I was a blasé sort of kid back then, but now my childhood is complete. (view spoiler)[In Copenhagen is the happiest and most comfortable I ever remember feeling. I did not enjoy being told that because the centre-right government is moving the emphasis away from equality and the Danes are losing faith in the public system, it will likely transform into France. (hide spoiler)] If there is one thing that put me off, Sweden is the third country in per capita number of immigrants, consequently, there is a chapter devoted to Swedish feelings and reactions to this issue. The narrator confessed to feeling strongly about this, to the point of leaving the room when such an opponent to immigration appeared on TV. I was very interested to see how it would be addressed and equally dissapointed afterwards. His only conflicting interview, with Swedish Democrat Eric Myrin, was short and drowned out in self-congratulatory pontificating mental monologues as the narrator addressed unemployment, for example, in full Socratic splendor: '...every year we have had unemployment at 10 per cent.’ ‘Which would suggest there is a fixed level of unemployment, irrespective of the level of immigration . . .’ There seemed little point in getting bogged down in statistics – Myrin was hardly likely to have a Damascene epiphany The unemployment rate is a very fickle position to take a stand on, because it represents those who don't have a job as a percentage of those who want to get a job; it does not include those who, for example, live off welfare and who don't want to look for a job, which might be one of the explanations for the stable unemployment rate. This is not a rigurous work and I did not expect a rigurous argument, but I would have liked an open approach to conflicting views: levity, not shallowness.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    “Where to Invade Next” becomes almost giddily optimistic once Mr. Moore visits Norway to investigate that country’s prisons; the maximum sentence is 21 years. Even convicted murderers are housed in the equivalent of small Manhattan studio apartments equipped with televisions and cookware, even sharp utensils. No one is locked in solitary confinement, prisoners have a lot of mobility and the principal punishment is separation from the rest of society." in: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/23/mov “Where to Invade Next” becomes almost giddily optimistic once Mr. Moore visits Norway to investigate that country’s prisons; the maximum sentence is 21 years. Even convicted murderers are housed in the equivalent of small Manhattan studio apartments equipped with televisions and cookware, even sharp utensils. No one is locked in solitary confinement, prisoners have a lot of mobility and the principal punishment is separation from the rest of society." in: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/23/mov... BUT Norwegian Mass Murderer Accepted to Oslo University in: http://time.com/3963203/anders-breivi... AND The “Swedish Model” Bernie Sanders cites is a myth in: http://hotair.com/archives/2015/10/19... "It is quite mystifying why Bernie Sanders can embrace a Swedish (or Scandinavian) model that disappeared decades ago." in: Who rules Sweden? https://louisproyect.org/2015/09/03/w... Why Denmark isn’t the utopian fantasy Bernie Sanders describes in: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/w... Sorry, Bernie — Scandinavia is no socialist paradise after all in: http://nypost.com/2015/10/19/sorry-be... Denmark to Bernie: Stop Dissing Us with That Word The Danes are worried that Bernie Sanders is giving them a bad name. in: http://www.the-american-interest.com/... "I hadn’t yet learned the mysterious code of the Danes, whose superficial similarities to Brits and Americans, I soon discovered, masked far deeper differences". in: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/20... http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014... http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neil Fox

    The World currently finds itself besotted with all things Nordic - our prime time TV features Danish detectives, we are in awe of Swedish minimalist design, Scandinavian cuisine is all the rage in New York and Educationalists from around the Globe traipse around the Finnish school system on a weekly basis to marvel at and pay homage to what is touted as the World's best. Seemingly we can't get enough of what this previously ignored frigid corner of Northern Europe has to offer. Michael Booth, a l The World currently finds itself besotted with all things Nordic - our prime time TV features Danish detectives, we are in awe of Swedish minimalist design, Scandinavian cuisine is all the rage in New York and Educationalists from around the Globe traipse around the Finnish school system on a weekly basis to marvel at and pay homage to what is touted as the World's best. Seemingly we can't get enough of what this previously ignored frigid corner of Northern Europe has to offer. Michael Booth, a longtime resident of Denmark, embarks on a journey with the intent of dissecting what lies beneath the perceptions, separating the myth from reality and trying to understand what really makes the Nordic societies tick. Starting in his adopted Denmark, he makes his way through Iceland, Norway, Finland and finally Sweden, interviewing academics, journalists and social commentators along the way. The egalitarian nature of society is widely believed to lie behind the high levels of happiness, contentment and social cohesion measured in the Nordic societies, which in turn is held to explain their economic success and high standards of living. Booth asks the question whether all is what it seems and explores the flip side of the coin taking a critical peek at the underbelly of these seemingly perfect societies. He explores why Denmark is regularly voted the "happiest" country on Earth; how the deep flaws of the Icelandic personality led them to financial collapse and National ruin in the Great Recession of 2008; how Norway, although avoiding the " resource curse" typically associated with oil producing countries, nevertheless suffers the distorting effect of its black gold throughout society in many subtle ways. The highest praise is reserved for the Finns, whose resourcefulness and stamina he highly admires, while at the same time he deftly tackles their National hang-up's and taboos on subjects such as the Swedish-speaking minority and the delicate relationship with Russia. The most virulent commentary is reserved for the Swedes. Echoing Andrew Brown's "Fishing in utopia" , Booth exposes how this wealthy, seemingly modern and progressive society is in fact a benign totalitarian Corporatist nanny state presided over by the Social Democrat machine and a half-witted Monarchy which, with ruthless pragmatism, shamefully betrayed its Nordic neighbors during WW2 and then feasted on the spoils of reconstruction, finally atoning for its guilt by re-inventing itself as a goody goody immigrant-friendly society from the 1960's. But the pressures of that very immigration policy combined with the elements of the Welfare State have brought to the fore the latent Nazi reactionary political element once again. Yes, the neighbors of Sweden will certainly chuckle and revel in Booth's viscous dissection of their tut-tutting big neighbor ! Booth misses out on the chance to explore deeper on how the anthropological and sociological side of things connect with the economical sphere. For example, the fact that the welfare state model is unsustainable in its present, unreformed form, supporting as it does a pensions and dependency time bomb, and being propped up by levels of taxation that are slowly strangling entrepreneurship and innovation, not to mention a slow-burn of productivity. Norwegians today effectively only work a 4-day week, and much of the region shuts down for the entire moth of July, meaning that 8% of annual working time is erased ( more when one considers everyone becomes de-mob happy more than one month before the July shutdown). Now this is fine if you're some dosser sitting in a government job, but crippling for small businesses trying to make ends meet. The corollary of the admirable fairness and equality in society is that the Nordic countries are very much nanny states with a pervasive state sector. The strong sense of social justice is warped when you consider that tax avoidance can carry stiffer jail sentences than murder in some cases in Sweden or that Finland has the quirky law that speeding fines are progressive with income - fine in theory, but why would speeding be a more serious offense if committed by a rich person vrs a poorer one ? Some pundits have applauded the innovativeness of this peculiar rule, but what it conceals in fact is an undercurrent of jealousy and bias against high earners and achievers. The author also passes up the opportunity to explore in more depth the extent to which uniquely Nordic traits contribute to economic afflictions like high unemployment, and not just to success. I use what I call the "IKEA-Isation" of society to illustrate this. The Nordic psyche contains a strong "do-it-yourself" gene. Inside every Finn lurks a little engineer just waiting to fix things up. Whilst Scandinavians with their long Summer holidays scoff at the Americans with their one-week annual vacations, the Americans actually spend that one week of vacation being on holiday, not toiling to repair or paint the roof on some dilapidated Summer cabin. IKEA could only have arisen from Sweden; no other Nationality could have come up with the concept of transferring the labour from the manufacturer to the consumer. This can also be seen in restaurants for example; the Scandinavian love affair with the buffet style of eating involves an "IKEA" style contract between the customer and the establishment whereby the labour normally performed by a waiter is transferred onto the customer. The effect of all this is that the service economy is underdeveloped and doesn't employ the numbers it could or should. ( not to mention offering up a plausible explanation for the legendary rude service)The 4 weeks Lars spends toiling over that Summer cabin could instead provide a job for an unemployed laborer while Lars takes himself off to the beach with the wife and kids.. But oh no, I must do it myself. The author does though hit the nail squarely on the head when he asks why do Nordic people put up with such high levels of taxation when it is increasingly evident that the model is unsustainable and that they are not even getting value for money in terms of services ? - it is simply because there is a vested interest in maintaining the status quo as the State Sector accounts for such a high percentage of GDP ( > 60% in the case of Finland) - to wish for anything else would be akin to a turkey wishing for Christmas. Booth, in trying to extract the secrets' of the Nordics' success, allows himself to get bogged down too often in statistics and boring academic musings, sometimes confusing correlation with causation, as he does in a particularly mind-bogglingly irrelevant debate as to whether "trust" came before the welfare state or vice versa; he has the tendency to use statistics in this much as a drunk man uses a lamp post - for support rather than illumination. Booth, while poking fun at and exposing embarrassing truths about his adoptive homeland of Denmark and its neighbors, nevertheless shows a strong attachment to, and respect and love for the Nordic countries, their people and their way of living and organizing society. He also admirably avoids the stereotyping that typically accompany travel writers' descriptions of Nordic experiences. If anything he underlines that while there is no such thing as a perfect society, you could do a lot worse than take a few learnings from these Nations, imperfect though they may be.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chaunceton Bird

    This is an entertaining and enlightening journey through the five Nordic nations. As an Englishman, Michael Booth's writing is witty enough to keep one chuckling throughout. This is also filled to the brim with statistics about each nation, and, coupled with the author's personal experiences and interviews conducted in these countries, Mr. Booth's book really covers all the bases. I recommend this to anybody interested in what makes these nations world leaders in everything important.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    (Full disclosure: book abandoned on page 76 [out of 416 pages].) Dry. I was expecting an engaging book in the vein of Bill Bryson's work, but Michael Booth is--at least in the first 76 pages--preoccupied with tax issues and finely detailed history of Denmark (the book's first chapter). It reads like a textbook.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    I should state off the bat that this won't be an objective review. I know the author and I have done plenty of writing myself about the foibles and fortes of the Danes, my hosts and neighbors for the past four years. But in The Almost Nearly Perfect People, Michael Booth has written something more comprehensively informative and hilariously opinionated than I could possibly hope to do about my adopted country. If that weren't enough, he did the same for Denmark's four Nordic neighbors: Sweden, N I should state off the bat that this won't be an objective review. I know the author and I have done plenty of writing myself about the foibles and fortes of the Danes, my hosts and neighbors for the past four years. But in The Almost Nearly Perfect People, Michael Booth has written something more comprehensively informative and hilariously opinionated than I could possibly hope to do about my adopted country. If that weren't enough, he did the same for Denmark's four Nordic neighbors: Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland. Surprisingly for me, while I really liked the Denmark section, I actually enjoyed the others more due to my general lack of knowledge about those countries. For anyone interested in this part of the world – particularly those who have swallowed the utopian picture presented by British and US media (for which Michael Booth himself is partly to blame) – this is a great read. For those of us living among them, it was almost nearly perfect.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    Interesting premise, but too long and repetitive in nature to hold my interest until the end.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Several revellers have climbed on to the tables and are dancing gingerly, but with enthusiasm, arms in the air, silly hats akimbo, their shirts still tucked firmly into their shorts. It is time for me to crawl off to a darkened room. This is Sweden. This is so not Sweden. Let's be honest, this isn't going to be a review. It'll be a long list of my favorites quotes (and, because there needs to be some constructive criticism, I've put that in the end for anyone who's interested). Also, most of th Several revellers have climbed on to the tables and are dancing gingerly, but with enthusiasm, arms in the air, silly hats akimbo, their shirts still tucked firmly into their shorts. It is time for me to crawl off to a darkened room. This is Sweden. This is so not Sweden. Let's be honest, this isn't going to be a review. It'll be a long list of my favorites quotes (and, because there needs to be some constructive criticism, I've put that in the end for anyone who's interested). Also, most of the quotes will be on Sweden, and if you think it's for any reason other than me being a swede, you're wrong. But what is this book? Why does it exist? I was quite surprised when I stumbled upon it. Because, well, I know the Scandinavian countries often score high on several different rankings. And, apparently, it's a couple of cultures that are often refereed to outside of Scandinavia, but few people outside of Scandinavia actually knows anything about these countries' cultures. According to the author. I have no clue if this is true or not. All I know is that when I say I'm from Sweden when outside of Scandinavia, most people think this is a good thing. Maybe it is, I'm not to decide that. Anyway, so the author made it his mission to learn about these countries, and this book is the result. Now, bring out the quotes! On Scandinavian, uhmm, language? Every race and language has their affirmative 'uh-huhs', their quizzical 'hmmm?s', and their verbal tics, but the Scandinavians seem to have turned them into a key mode of communication. Yup, we use a lot of short sounds. It's confusing to people that aren't used to it. I once had to explain one of them about six times before the other person began to understand it. On graduating gymnasium (our equivalence of high school) Throughout all of Scandinavia, gymnasium (high school),graduates celebrate by parading through their home towns on the backs of an assortment of open-aired farm vehicles, trucks and buses, clutching festively chinking carrier bags, and getting off with each other. In Denmark and Sweden, for some reason, they wear vaguely nautical-looking, peaked white caps, which make them look as if they are part of a sailing club. And when he say ride around on them, in Sweden, we ride around on them for a looooong time. And we ride them in the evening. My class? Oh, we started at ten in the evening and went on about it until noon the next day. Some people were on it for over sixteen hours. I promise, we're not crazy. On rivalry "[The animosity] is there in the grudging way the Danes react to Swedish economic success and the global domination of IKEA (it hardly help that the Swedish company insists on naming its least dignified products - door mats, and so forth - after Danish towns). On Finnish School System At the University of Helsinki a couple of years ago they had 2,400 applications for the 120 places on the master's programme. FUN FACT: In Sweden, last year more people applied for Paradise Hotel (Big Brother-ish Reality tv-show) than to the teacher program at university. On swedes [The Swedes] would rather take the stairs than share a lift... Or, if you're at a bus stop, waiting, you must, at all times, keep at least 5 feet between you and the others that are waiting. Don't go closer than that, not even if you must ask something, say, if this is the right bus you're waiting on. On swedes social skills We don't know how to talk to people we don't know. That's really interesting, because mot people like to talk. In southern Europe it's the best thing in life. I have a French colleague and when she came to Sweden she was convinced it was forbidden to talk on buses. She couldn't find any other explanation. This is my favorite. Because it captures so well how strange swedes might seem to outsiders. Again, we're not crazy, promise! Those are some of my favorites. Now to the other stuff. While this book does offers some good (and funny) insight, there's some minor errors, I'd say. But those are, as said, minor. This book relies too heavily on anecdotes and a few selected people's research. As well as when talking to politicians and other important people, it's often one sides. Not enough to give a broad and complex picture of, for example, politics. And to someone from Scandinavia, it's easy to see these dark spots. But to an outsider? Probably not. On the whole though, a humorous take on our countries and some interesting facts (some that I didn't really know of, like a conspiracy theory regarding Norway's oil). A good read if you have time leftover to kill! | BookLikes | Leafmarks |

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma Deplores Goodreads Censorship

    This is basically the world’s longest magazine article. I kept reading because the author had a great idea for a book: we in the English-speaking world are always idealizing the Nordic countries, but we don’t actually know much about what it’s like to live there, nor do we visit them very often or learn their languages. So the author, a Brit married to a Dane and living in Copenhagen, proposed to travel around these countries and report on, as the bookjacket claims, “how they may not be as happy This is basically the world’s longest magazine article. I kept reading because the author had a great idea for a book: we in the English-speaking world are always idealizing the Nordic countries, but we don’t actually know much about what it’s like to live there, nor do we visit them very often or learn their languages. So the author, a Brit married to a Dane and living in Copenhagen, proposed to travel around these countries and report on, as the bookjacket claims, “how they may not be as happy or as perfect as we assume.” Which could have been great, if it weren’t so light and frivolous. Aside from giving a brief overview of the history of each of the five countries included (Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland), chapters cover topics such as a visit to a sauna; a visit to Santa’s Village; traditionally-dressed revelers celebrating Norwegian Constitution Day; and a visit to a supposedly dangerous housing project occupied by Muslim immigrants in Malmö, which turns out to be pretty quiet and unremarkable when the author visits in the middle of the day and doesn’t actually talk to any immigrants other than the elderly Macedonian who heads the local mosque. The book does briefly explore various issues – immigration, the rise of right-wing politics, high levels of taxation and government involvement in society, the causes of Iceland’s economic woes – mostly through talking to a small group of writers and professors who give rather fuzzy impressionistic answers. But he never does really get “behind the myth” in the way I expected. After his stroll through the housing project, he observes that its Swedish neighbors, said to resent the immigrants, “probably faced precisely the same problems as their immigrant neighbors in Herregården – poor education, few opportunities, little hope, and no money – yet each was fearful and resentful of the other.” Wait. Stop the presses. This is it – this is “behind the myth.” Sweden isn’t supposed to have people, especially native-born ethnic Swedes, with “poor education, few opportunities, little hope, and no money.” Isn’t that the entire point of the welfare state? Isn’t that the heart of the “myth”? And yet Booth just keeps tripping blithely along, talking about views on immigration and even including a chapter entitled “Class” that turns out to be all about the weirdness of the Scandinavian monarchies. In another baffling omission, he observes that a Norwegian museum “featur[es] the usual Nordic tiptoeing around the subject of their oppressed indigenous minority,” then proceeds to describe the exhibit, note the Sami’s territory and numbers, and never mention them again. I checked the index just to make sure and yep, this is the only mention in the entire book. How you can think you’re writing a book about a region’s negative aspects and not include its generational poverty or oppressed indigenous minority, I have no idea. But on to Legoland! The book is very focused on the author’s own experiences and observations, while some of his theories are just wacky. For instance, he theorizes that Finnish men drink too much because their country has a long history of foreign rule and military defeat, never mind that this does not appear to affect modern-day Finns in any way. He even writes about floating this theory to others, who all shoot it down, which doesn’t stop him from devoting a full two pages to defending it in the book. Now sure, if you are looking for a lighthearted travelogue that will introduce you to a few cultural concepts, and fill you in on a bit of history and politics, this may be the book for you. I didn’t find it as funny as others did, perhaps because it relies heavily on pop culture references that don’t mean anything to me (“Swedish unemployment figures are about as reliable as Joan Collins’s age”). The book is just so long, without achieving any real depth, that at times I considered not even finishing it. I did learn some things from it, but I would have appreciated it more if it had been pared down and marketed as the lighthearted travelogue that it is.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I was under no delusion that the Nordic countries were utopias. There's some endemic racism, for example. But it surely can't hurt for us (Americans) to strive to be more like Norway or Finland! The author of this book, a Brit living in Denmark, sets out to dispel those impressions of Scandinavian utopias, but Booth happens to truly and unabashedly love these countries too. So he mixes the myth-busting with fascinatingly detailed discussions of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden - and I was under no delusion that the Nordic countries were utopias. There's some endemic racism, for example. But it surely can't hurt for us (Americans) to strive to be more like Norway or Finland! The author of this book, a Brit living in Denmark, sets out to dispel those impressions of Scandinavian utopias, but Booth happens to truly and unabashedly love these countries too. So he mixes the myth-busting with fascinatingly detailed discussions of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden - and how the countries differ from one another in ways I never realized. It's also quite funny and works as an amusing travel narrative. And speaking personally, Booth confirmed my suspicion that I was meant to be born Scandinavian: land of loners who read a lot, like to drink, refuse to smile on cue, are mostly socialist democrats who support universal health care and gender equity and long vacations, and profess atheism but sometimes might believe in invisible elves and 'little folk'.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Niels Wang-Holm

    What a bunch of crap - it would be funny, if just half of what he wrote was based on some sort of factual evidence. But it seems he is just picking it up from the top of his head as he goes along. Also, in his writing style he comes of as an arrongant neoliberal conservative, complaining about taxes and equality, wishing that that things were as they are in his home country the UK - so if things are better in the UK, why does he and his family choose to live in Denmark? Maybe because of the welfa What a bunch of crap - it would be funny, if just half of what he wrote was based on some sort of factual evidence. But it seems he is just picking it up from the top of his head as he goes along. Also, in his writing style he comes of as an arrongant neoliberal conservative, complaining about taxes and equality, wishing that that things were as they are in his home country the UK - so if things are better in the UK, why does he and his family choose to live in Denmark? Maybe because of the welfare system that is being sustained through high taxes...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily Fortuna

    Could not finish this. I was really disappointed with how the author conflated "happiness" and "well being" with outward, public displays of joy. The author conflates these two different things for the effect of entertainment rather than providing an honest representation.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Booth's look at the politics and culture of Scandinavia is highly funny and readable. What I found most interesting is how much of what we take for granted as a fact of life is really dependent a nation's culture. In Denmark and Sweden, for example, doing or saying anything that might suggest you are better than someone else in any way is considered incredibly rude. People do not talk about winning awards or how well their kids are doing in school. Booth spends a lot of time talking about this a Booth's look at the politics and culture of Scandinavia is highly funny and readable. What I found most interesting is how much of what we take for granted as a fact of life is really dependent a nation's culture. In Denmark and Sweden, for example, doing or saying anything that might suggest you are better than someone else in any way is considered incredibly rude. People do not talk about winning awards or how well their kids are doing in school. Booth spends a lot of time talking about this attitude can encourage mediocrity and feel kind of stifling. But to me, it's also sort of liberating to know that our obsession with achievement and public recognition in the US is only a social construct. It's also easy regard certain political persuasions as sort of ingrained. But in Sweden, for example, you get extreme right wingers are are very anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim, but who will also defend the national health service with their dying breath. Try to imagine that in the US.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    The question of everyone's mind these days seems to be: What's so great about Scandinavia? Michael Booth, an Englishman living in Denmark, decides to explore this question and ventures out to Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, and Denmark and tries to put his finger on what makes the people of these countries so happy. Booth manages to take a close look at the social nets in place, the comprehensive health care systems, the amazing educational systems, and the Scandinavians' perceived happiness a The question of everyone's mind these days seems to be: What's so great about Scandinavia? Michael Booth, an Englishman living in Denmark, decides to explore this question and ventures out to Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, and Denmark and tries to put his finger on what makes the people of these countries so happy. Booth manages to take a close look at the social nets in place, the comprehensive health care systems, the amazing educational systems, and the Scandinavians' perceived happiness along with the high taxes paid, the Scandinavians' relationship with alcohol, and the problems with immigration, and he does so in ways that always make me snort with laughter, a Bill Bryson of the Norselands, if you will.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Booth is a Brit married to a Dane and resides in his wife's homeland. Here he decides to explore the myth that Scandinavia and the people who live there are perfect, affluent and happier than the rest of the world. I found this really interesting and I feel like I learned a lot of things too. Would recommend this to anyone interested in the Nordic lands.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    (view spoiler)[ Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)] NB On sites that allow 1/2 stars this is showing at half a star. (view spoiler)[ Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)] NB On sites that allow 1/2 stars this is showing at half a star.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    funny at times, definitely enlightening and gets all the stereotypes covered!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.