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The A.O.C. Cookbook

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Since her James Beard Award-winning first book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin and her Los Angeles empire of restaurants have blossomed and she has been lauded as one of the best chefs in the country. Now, she is bringing us the recipes from her sophomore restaurant, A.O.C., turning the small-plate, shared-style dishes that she made so famous into main courses for Since her James Beard Award-winning first book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin and her Los Angeles empire of restaurants have blossomed and she has been lauded as one of the best chefs in the country. Now, she is bringing us the recipes from her sophomore restaurant, A.O.C., turning the small-plate, shared-style dishes that she made so famous into main courses for the home chef. Among her many recipes, you can expect her addictive Bacon-Wrapped Dates with Parmesan; Duck Sausage with Candied Kumquats; Dandelion and Roasted Carrot Salad with Black Olives and Ricotta Salata; California Sea Bass with Tomato Rice, Fried Egg, and Sopressata; Lamb Meatballs with Spiced Tomato Sauce, Mint, and Feta; Crème Fraîche Cake with Santa Rosa Plums and Pistachios in Olive Oil; and S’Mores with Caramel Popcorn and Chocolate Sorbet.    But The A.O.C. Cookbook is much more than just a collection of recipes. Because Goin is a born teacher with a gift for pairing seasonal flavors, this book is full of wonderful, eye-opening information about the ingredients that she holds dear. She takes the time to talk you through each one of her culinary decisions, explaining her palate and how she gets the deeply developed flavor profiles, which make even the simplest dishes sing. More than anything, Goin wants you to understand her techniques so you enjoy yourself in the kitchen and have no problem achieving restaurant-quality results right at home. And because wine and cheese are at the heart of A.O.C., there are two exciting additions. Caroline Styne, Goin’s business partner and the wine director for her restaurants, presents a specific wine pairing for each dish. Styne explains why each varietal works well with the ingredients and which flavors she’s trying to highlight, and she gives you room to experiment as well—showing how to shape the wine to your own palate. Whether you’re just grabbing a glass to go with dinner or planning an entire menu, her expert notes are a real education in wine. At the back of the book, you’ll find Goin’s amazing glossary of cheeses—all featured at A.O.C.—along with the notes that are given to the waitstaff, explaining the sources, flavor profiles, and pairings.                With more than 125 full-color photographs, The A.O.C. Cookbook brings Suzanne Goin’s dishes to life as she continues to invite us into her kitchen and divulge the secrets about what makes her food so irresistibly delicious.   


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Since her James Beard Award-winning first book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin and her Los Angeles empire of restaurants have blossomed and she has been lauded as one of the best chefs in the country. Now, she is bringing us the recipes from her sophomore restaurant, A.O.C., turning the small-plate, shared-style dishes that she made so famous into main courses for Since her James Beard Award-winning first book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin and her Los Angeles empire of restaurants have blossomed and she has been lauded as one of the best chefs in the country. Now, she is bringing us the recipes from her sophomore restaurant, A.O.C., turning the small-plate, shared-style dishes that she made so famous into main courses for the home chef. Among her many recipes, you can expect her addictive Bacon-Wrapped Dates with Parmesan; Duck Sausage with Candied Kumquats; Dandelion and Roasted Carrot Salad with Black Olives and Ricotta Salata; California Sea Bass with Tomato Rice, Fried Egg, and Sopressata; Lamb Meatballs with Spiced Tomato Sauce, Mint, and Feta; Crème Fraîche Cake with Santa Rosa Plums and Pistachios in Olive Oil; and S’Mores with Caramel Popcorn and Chocolate Sorbet.    But The A.O.C. Cookbook is much more than just a collection of recipes. Because Goin is a born teacher with a gift for pairing seasonal flavors, this book is full of wonderful, eye-opening information about the ingredients that she holds dear. She takes the time to talk you through each one of her culinary decisions, explaining her palate and how she gets the deeply developed flavor profiles, which make even the simplest dishes sing. More than anything, Goin wants you to understand her techniques so you enjoy yourself in the kitchen and have no problem achieving restaurant-quality results right at home. And because wine and cheese are at the heart of A.O.C., there are two exciting additions. Caroline Styne, Goin’s business partner and the wine director for her restaurants, presents a specific wine pairing for each dish. Styne explains why each varietal works well with the ingredients and which flavors she’s trying to highlight, and she gives you room to experiment as well—showing how to shape the wine to your own palate. Whether you’re just grabbing a glass to go with dinner or planning an entire menu, her expert notes are a real education in wine. At the back of the book, you’ll find Goin’s amazing glossary of cheeses—all featured at A.O.C.—along with the notes that are given to the waitstaff, explaining the sources, flavor profiles, and pairings.                With more than 125 full-color photographs, The A.O.C. Cookbook brings Suzanne Goin’s dishes to life as she continues to invite us into her kitchen and divulge the secrets about what makes her food so irresistibly delicious.   

30 review for The A.O.C. Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    I'm debating whether to rate this 3 or 4 stars. Like her previous book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, The A.O.C. Cookbook has recipes from Goin's restaurant. The book is wonderfully crafted, photographed, and organized (by season). There is also the lovely benefit of having wine suggestions, which her previous book did not. However, this book seems to be intended more for the restaurateur and home cooks (with fancy kitchens, large wallets, and lots of time on their hands). Even though I couldn't co I'm debating whether to rate this 3 or 4 stars. Like her previous book, Sunday Suppers at Lucques, The A.O.C. Cookbook has recipes from Goin's restaurant. The book is wonderfully crafted, photographed, and organized (by season). There is also the lovely benefit of having wine suggestions, which her previous book did not. However, this book seems to be intended more for the restaurateur and home cooks (with fancy kitchens, large wallets, and lots of time on their hands). Even though I couldn't cook much from her previous book, I loved it. I loved the organization, the stories behind the recipes, and the premise of the book (spending a Sunday to cook a beautiful meal). With The A.O.C. cookbook, I just can't see myself making anything from it, despite knowing that whatever I did cook would be fantastic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Pros- very unusual recipes I would do some recipes for entertainment. She had some beef recipes that looked fantastic. beautifully photographed dynamic vegetable section. I would be all over that!!! I wish that she would have done a "vegetarian" meal/main course section. It def. would have flown in this book. some pretty tasty looking desserts, I must admit! I will need to make a couple of them. Cons- Difficult to make dishes, so this cookbook would not be for the novice chef Most foods I would not ea Pros- very unusual recipes I would do some recipes for entertainment. She had some beef recipes that looked fantastic. beautifully photographed dynamic vegetable section. I would be all over that!!! I wish that she would have done a "vegetarian" meal/main course section. It def. would have flown in this book. some pretty tasty looking desserts, I must admit! I will need to make a couple of them. Cons- Difficult to make dishes, so this cookbook would not be for the novice chef Most foods I would not eat, such as halibut, pork cheeks, lamb, duck and veal Not family friendly, AT ALL...not even the desserts A chunk of expensive and difficult to get ingredients Almost too much "back story"...although the little girl's lemonade stand teared me up.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I haven't eaten at AOC. Maybe if I had I would have liked this a bit better. I did find a few things that look interesting to make mostly in the salad and desert sections. I haven't eaten at AOC. Maybe if I had I would have liked this a bit better. I did find a few things that look interesting to make mostly in the salad and desert sections.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    review solely based on her creme fraiche plum cake with plum caramel. i used yogurt instead of creme fraiche and screwed up the caramel and still it was a super fruity, moist, amazing cake.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pixie

    The stories; the thoughts behind why she puts together those dishes; the seasonal, local ingredients; the thoughtful wine paring notes from her restaurant partner; the clear and detailed recipes that are a cooking class in themselves; some lovely food photos; all combine to make this a top-notch cookbook. Sometimes I copy a recipe or two out of a book that I think I might want to try (due to ingredients or techniques that I like, for instance), but if I were to try and copy all the worthy recipe The stories; the thoughts behind why she puts together those dishes; the seasonal, local ingredients; the thoughtful wine paring notes from her restaurant partner; the clear and detailed recipes that are a cooking class in themselves; some lovely food photos; all combine to make this a top-notch cookbook. Sometimes I copy a recipe or two out of a book that I think I might want to try (due to ingredients or techniques that I like, for instance), but if I were to try and copy all the worthy recipes out of this book, I would be copying the whole thing! The focus is on farm-direct (through CSAs or good farmer's markets) and artisanal ingredients, which is exactly what I want to use as well as read about.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne Brockhoff

    This book is as well written as it is gorgeous. I loved author Suzanne Goin's easy recollections of past meals, farmers and friends, techniques and tastes, and the photos alone made me hungry for dozens of dishes. That said, I'd probably rather eat them at her restaurant than make them at home. As delicious as 'Beef Brisket with Slow-Roasted Romano Beans and Black Olive Aioli' surely is, I just can't bring myself to swap the four pages of instructions for the simple brisket recipe I've used for This book is as well written as it is gorgeous. I loved author Suzanne Goin's easy recollections of past meals, farmers and friends, techniques and tastes, and the photos alone made me hungry for dozens of dishes. That said, I'd probably rather eat them at her restaurant than make them at home. As delicious as 'Beef Brisket with Slow-Roasted Romano Beans and Black Olive Aioli' surely is, I just can't bring myself to swap the four pages of instructions for the simple brisket recipe I've used for years. That said, I generally cook gluten- and dairy-free, and there are certainly recipes in here that I bypassed because of that. It's worth a read, and if you have the time and tolerance, probably well worth cooking from. Buy or borrow? Borrow.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    the title says it all. this is a cookbook filled with recipes her kitchen prepares, and you likely won't be able to duplicate at home. she mixes many unique ingredients, which would be a struggle to find from just one store, so i've concluded that these are simply restaurant recipes, and the cookbook is for her line chefs. that being said, the fish dishes in particular look delightful. there are a number of creative salad recipes. but given this book's focus on seasonal ingredients, it's not a bo the title says it all. this is a cookbook filled with recipes her kitchen prepares, and you likely won't be able to duplicate at home. she mixes many unique ingredients, which would be a struggle to find from just one store, so i've concluded that these are simply restaurant recipes, and the cookbook is for her line chefs. that being said, the fish dishes in particular look delightful. there are a number of creative salad recipes. but given this book's focus on seasonal ingredients, it's not a book you'd turn to regularly, and it's organized both by recipe type and then internally by season, so it's not easy to use. the author is very wordy and the recipes can drone on for pages.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    The food sounds tasty and there are good instructions, but I just wasn't dying to make anything in particular in here. Our cooking group made 7 things from the book. They were all quite good, though there were mistakes in the text of the book that required throwing out ruined ingredients - eg 4 cups water to 1 cup black rice. Also, this is truly restaurant cooking. I made the coq au vin, undoubtedly a truly tasty recipe, but it called for cooking the chicken 3 different ways. I will keep 3 of the The food sounds tasty and there are good instructions, but I just wasn't dying to make anything in particular in here. Our cooking group made 7 things from the book. They were all quite good, though there were mistakes in the text of the book that required throwing out ruined ingredients - eg 4 cups water to 1 cup black rice. Also, this is truly restaurant cooking. I made the coq au vin, undoubtedly a truly tasty recipe, but it called for cooking the chicken 3 different ways. I will keep 3 of the recipes we tried, but I won't try anything else. Glad I used a library copy of the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Definitely going to buy this when I can. Made the spicy tomato sauce and bookmarked a bunch of other recipes. Many of them I've seen altered and then published on food blogs, but it would be great to have the full collection. Definitely going to buy this when I can. Made the spicy tomato sauce and bookmarked a bunch of other recipes. Many of them I've seen altered and then published on food blogs, but it would be great to have the full collection.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caren

    Some interesting recipes. Many expensive and hard to get ingredients. I have liked every recipe that I have made from it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    E

    The more time I spend with this cookbook - the more amazing I realize it is!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    Some lovely sounding recipes (though mainly not vegetarian) and the veg recipes sounded good. But nothing that I'm in a huge rush to make. Some lovely sounding recipes (though mainly not vegetarian) and the veg recipes sounded good. But nothing that I'm in a huge rush to make.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    People seem to love this cookbook, but it wasn't my style at all. The recipes didn't sound that interesting. Stuff that sounded interesting seemed to be more complicated than the dish was worth. People seem to love this cookbook, but it wasn't my style at all. The recipes didn't sound that interesting. Stuff that sounded interesting seemed to be more complicated than the dish was worth.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Linda Zimmerman

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bob Joyal

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Collie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mia Keyes

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nick Stengel

  22. 5 out of 5

    Phaedra

  23. 5 out of 5

    Renee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chrome

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pat

  27. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robin Zappavigna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Andrews

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