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50 Simple Questions for Every Christian

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A friendly and conversational inquiry from a skeptic about basic Christian belief. Designed to promote constructive dialogue, Christians will find the book useful as a basis for developing their apologetics, while skeptics will welcome Harrisons probing rational analysis of religious claims.


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A friendly and conversational inquiry from a skeptic about basic Christian belief. Designed to promote constructive dialogue, Christians will find the book useful as a basis for developing their apologetics, while skeptics will welcome Harrisons probing rational analysis of religious claims.

30 review for 50 Simple Questions for Every Christian

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dwayne Fry

    To be honest, I did not read this book in completion. I noticed the title while browsing books at the library and read enough to get an idea what it was about, checked it out and then skimmed it while waiting for my car to be worked on yesterday. I read enough to see what the book's real goal is. The author poses "simple" questions for Christians. The author is an atheist and a skeptic (and the way he uses the word, frequently seems to be saying no religious person could be religious and a skepti To be honest, I did not read this book in completion. I noticed the title while browsing books at the library and read enough to get an idea what it was about, checked it out and then skimmed it while waiting for my car to be worked on yesterday. I read enough to see what the book's real goal is. The author poses "simple" questions for Christians. The author is an atheist and a skeptic (and the way he uses the word, frequently seems to be saying no religious person could be religious and a skeptic at the same time). The author often reminds us he's not trying to upset anyone, so often that I wonder who he's trying to convince that he's not offensive: himself or the Christian reader. Quite honestly, I wasn't offended, upset or even challenged by anything I'd seen here. There are no new arguments. I have not even been a Christian for four years yet and there's nothing here that I haven't been confronted with. The problem I have with the book and the reason I did not read it fully is this: Guy Harrison asks the "simple" questions, then tells us what is the typical Christian answer, then spends several paragraphs explaining why he doesn't like the answer. I often wondered if he is expecting Christians to change their beliefs so they are more comfortable for him or just easier for him to understand. The fact is, even Jesus himself had people turn away from him when he taught. (John 6:60-66.) To me, this is enough to answer one or two questions in Guy's book (such as "why isn't everyone a Christian?") but to him this would not be sufficient since I took it from the Bible and he seems to feel the Bible is not a reliable source. So be it. I don't expect everyone to understand Christianity, nor do I expect to be able to explain it to everyone. To anyone, frankly. I don't understand atheism, but accept atheist's reasons for being atheists. I don't understand Islam, but have talked with Muslims about their faith a few times and didn't become frustrated that they didn't give answers I could completely understand. Now, had I the time and patience (okay, to be honest, if I wasn't so darned lazy) I'd love to write a 350 page book to respond to Mr. Harrison's 350 page book. I am too lazy for that. So, I targeted one paragraph I would love to respond to in hopes to explain why this book was useless to me and would be to any thinking Christian: "Suppose we could identify the most important and deserving prayer request of all and then measure its effectiveness objectively. Would that say something meaningful about the claim that God/Jesus answers prayers? I think so. Consider the prayer of a mother, spoken aloud or thought in silence, as she embraces her suffering and dying baby: "I beg you, God, save my baby. Please, God, don't let her die." This is a prayer for a young child, easily the most innocent and worthy of rescue of anyone. It's about as sincere and unselfish as any prayer could be. I think this is the prayer that provides us with an ideal way to judge whether or not God answers prayers." (Quoted from the fourth chapter "Does Jesus answer prayers?") Notice, first, that Mr. Harrison is trying to play on our emotions, not engaging our intellect. He's created a scenario that is gut-wrenching and a horrid nightmare to most anyone that gives a fig about the welfare of children. Notice, too, that instead of possibly polling a few Christians (he claims over and over that he interviews Christians often) as to what they consider an "unselfish" prayer, he creates one of his own. Notice, thirdly, that he agrees for himself and his reader that this is the "most important and deserving prayer". He's setting up a straw-man, which he goes on in the next few paragraphs to knock down by talking about children living in impoverished countries and how they die often despite the prayers. My reaction to this scenario, as given, is that perhaps God has decided it would be best, it would be more merciful for the child to die and climb into the waiting arms of Jesus rather than to continue to live and suffer. If Mr. Harrison is truly trying to understand Christianity, then he should at least understand that to us dying is not the end of it all. Sure, we're saddened when people die as we will miss them. Sure, we don't believe we should commit suicide so we can see Jesus sooner. We see life as a gift and it isn't for us to take. Only God can make that decision. If Mr. Harrison can't at least acknowledge this as our belief, he will never understand us. I'm not even suggesting he agree with it, just at least acknowledge it. The other mistake Guy Harrison makes in the above paragraph is to take the judgement away from God and make it himself. Harrison concludes that this child is more worthy of rescue than anyone. God would see us all as equally worthy of "rescue". I would repeat again, if God is real and heaven is real, maybe the true "rescue" is to take the child into his arms rather than let it continue to suffer. If Guy Harrison were to ask me what an unselfish prayer is, I would give a very different idea of prayer. Probably the most unselfish prayer I've ever uttered is, "God, show me the best way to serve you." And that is not even the most unselfish prayer I've heard. There's a popular Christian song that says, "break our hearts for what breaks yours". I think the most unselfish prayer I can think of is in the 84th Psalm: "My soul yearns, even faints, for the courts of the Lord; my heart and my flesh cry out for the living God." I will be honest about why I am writing this paragraph. I don't intend for any non-believers to see it and understand it, it is really my hope that any Christian that might be mislead by Harrison's notions of unselfish prayer would see it and be reminded that while there is nothing wrong with praying for the health and well-being of a loved one, all things are in God's hands. If a loved one is ill or dies, it's not because God doesn't love us or doesn't answer prayers. And not only do I find prayers to serve or know God better to be the most unselfish, they've also been the prayers that bring the most peace and happiness to my soul. I won't discount the entire book. There is a chapter in there somewhere stating that many Christians don't read the Bible. I do think we should all read the Bible enough to get familiar with it and make an effort to read it every day. However, if Guy Harrison would take an honest crack at the Bible at some point, he might find the answers to all the other questions in his book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Book

    50 Simple Questions for Every Christian by Guy P. Harrison “50 Simple Questions for Every Christian" is a friendly skeptic’s challenge to Christians about their beliefs. In a respectful conversational tone, Guy P. Harrison guides the reader through fifty stimulating questions about Christian beliefs. Harrison’s responds to each question in a thought-provoking manner while remaining courteous. This interesting 350-page book is composed of fifty questions that cover the gamut of Christian beliefs. 50 Simple Questions for Every Christian by Guy P. Harrison “50 Simple Questions for Every Christian" is a friendly skeptic’s challenge to Christians about their beliefs. In a respectful conversational tone, Guy P. Harrison guides the reader through fifty stimulating questions about Christian beliefs. Harrison’s responds to each question in a thought-provoking manner while remaining courteous. This interesting 350-page book is composed of fifty questions that cover the gamut of Christian beliefs. Positives: 1. Elegant and engaging conversational tone, a Guy Harrison trademark. 2. The most interesting topic of discussion, religion, in the hands of a master thinker. This book covers a wide range of Christian beliefs. 3. A well-researched book that is well referenced and cited. 4. An intellectual treat. Thought-provoking responses to interesting questions while never once being condescending or disrespectful. 5. This book is a challenge for Christians to think deeply about their beliefs. Harrison typically provides common apologetic answers and proceeds to dismantle them with lucid precision. 6. So many great reasons why skeptics walk away unconvinced from basic Christian claims. “Shouldn’t the courage to accept reality as it is and not as we would prefer it to be an admirable quality?” 7. Religion and politics. “Asking people about their religion is not rude when they are the ones who made a big deal about it. It’s not only appropriate to explore such extraordinary claims by candidates; in a democracy, it’s a responsibility.” 8. The efficacy of prayers. “The real world looks just like it might look if prayer didn’t work and no gods existed.” 9. Why everyone is an atheist…” As many skeptics point out over and over, everyone is an atheist. It’s just a matter of degree. Nobody thinks every god is real.” 10. Book contains many interesting results from surveys, “According to a 2009 survey by the Harris Poll®, 76 percent of adult Americans believe in miracles, and 95 percent of born-again Christians do.” 11. The importance of keeping ignorance in perspective, “Common sense should tell us that our ignorance proves nothing, least of all the existence of gods.” 12. Modern brain biology as it relates to beliefs, “Science has revealed much about the brain’s ability to fool us into thinking we have physically experienced things that never really happened.” 13. A look at prophecies. “According to the Bible, Jesus said he would return very soon, within the lifetimes of those people he was speaking to.” 14. The Ten Commandments an interesting critical look and how it conflicts with the Constitution. “It’s not about trying to insult God, oppressing anyone’s religion, or refusing to acknowledge the significant role of Christianity in society. It is about recognizing that seeking to impose the very specific religious laws of some undermines fairness for all.” 15. A really good chapter on Christianity’s role in American history. 16. So was Hitler an atheist? And what does it prove? Find out. 17. Fine-tuning argument in a different light. “If our planet is fine-tuned for life, then why does life have such a hard time here?” 18. The difference between not believing and rejecting, “A typical atheist, for example, doesn’t really “choose” to be a nonbeliever. She is a nonbeliever because she is not convinced that Jesus or any other gods exist. This is a very important point. Christians often confuse not believing in Jesus with rejecting Jesus, but the two are very different.” 19. Evolution and how it relates to Christianity. “The problem with evolution lies with religion and culture, not with science.” 20. Science and religion. “But they should not interpret the absence of scientific proof for scientific assault. Maybe it is not science in general that some Christians don’t feel comfortable with; rather it is this absence of validation from science that bothers them.” 21. Is religion good for societies? “There is no proof that more religion leads to less crime in a city, state, or country. In fact, a lot of good evidence points in the opposite direction.” 22. Perhaps my favorite point of the book, “The Bible’s greatest problem is not that it often makes God look like a deranged, bloodthirsty maniac, or even that it contains numerous errors. No, the real reason the Bible hasn’t been able to convince everyone everywhere that Jesus is the only path to heaven is that it is poorly written and structured. Virtually everything about it is wrong if its purpose is to speak for God to the world.” 23. How vision and memory works. “You can “see” past events happening in your head and have total confidence that they happened exactly that way—even though they didn’t”. 24. The problem of evil dissected. “It is beyond all reason that a god who is good and loves people would initiate and maintain a course of action that includes so much unjust harm to so many people.” 25. The value of skepticism. “Good skeptics are people who make the decision to use their brains, to be honest, and to try their best to live in the real world—whatever world that may turn out to be. More than anything, being a good skeptic is about courage and commitment”. 26. Excellent notes and comprehensive bibliography. Negatives: 1. I would have liked a table on say the twenty most popular Christian denominations and their most distinctive qualities. 2. A couple of questions that I was hoping would be asked. What is the soul? What is a spirit? In summary, an intellectual treat. Guy Harrison has earned his reputation of delivering high-quality thought-provoking books. The 50 insert thought-provoking topic series by a masterful writer with lucid, well-reasoned and respectful arguments is a Harrison trademark. It’s not a matter of faith with Guy Harrison; it’s a matter of trust. A skeptical look at Christian beliefs, this is a page-turner of a book, I highly recommend it! Further suggestions: "Why I Became an Atheist: A Former Preacher Rejects Christianity" and "The End of Christianity" by John Loftus, "Sense and Goodness Without God: A Defense of Metaphysical Naturalism" and "Why I'm Not a Christian" by Richard Carrier, "Natural Atheism", "Atheism Advanced: Further Thoughts of a Freethinker" and "Cruel Creeds, Virtuous Violence: Religious Violence Across Culture and History" by Dr. David Eller, "Man Made God: A Collection of Essays" by Barbara G. Walker, "The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values" by Sam Harris, "The Invention of the Jewish People" by Shlomo Sand, "The Portable Atheist" by Christopher Hitchens, "The End of Biblical Studies" by Hector Avalos, "Forged..." by Bart Ehrman, "God: The Failed Hypothesis. How Science Shows That God Does Not Exist" by Victor J. Stenger, "Godless" by Dan Barker, "Christian No More" by Jeffrey Mark, and "The Invention of God" by Bill Lauritzen.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scout Collins

    50 Simple Questions for Every Christian is a book for religious and non-religious people. It's for Christians who are open minded enough to think about some questions about their religion. It's for other religious people and non-religious people to learn about and possibly question Christianity. I read this after I read 50 Reasons People Give for Believing in God, also by Guy P. Harrison. This book was a bit similar and written in the same style, just focusing exclusively on Christians this time. 50 Simple Questions for Every Christian is a book for religious and non-religious people. It's for Christians who are open minded enough to think about some questions about their religion. It's for other religious people and non-religious people to learn about and possibly question Christianity. I read this after I read 50 Reasons People Give for Believing in God, also by Guy P. Harrison. This book was a bit similar and written in the same style, just focusing exclusively on Christians this time. I like the author's thinking, and generally agree with him. The main thing I didn't love (and didn't love about his other book either) was that he is a very cold-hard-facts kind of guy, and discredits things like miracles (not that I'm a big miracle-believer, but still)... He really stuck to the skeptical, stick-with-facts, rational, logical viewpoint and didn't appeal as much to the emotional side of some issues. Good Things/Good Quotes "Another common error that Christians make when thinking about nonbelievers is that they believe atheism is a declaration that no gods exist. It is not. Again, remember atheism is no belief in gods." (Harrison, 54). "First, burden of proof rests on the shoulders of the person making the claim [that god is real] and no one else. If, for example, someone says to me, "Fairies are real and you should believe in them," it's not my responsibility to prove that fairies don't exist. It's the believer's job to make the case for fairies." (54). Good chapter about women in Christianity. He quoted Ruth Hurmence Green: "As long as women fail to denounce the Bible, they are in danger from it, for it has long been and continues to be their greatest oppressor. Its scriptures demean her and deprive her not only of her self-respect, but of veritable control over her body. The body makes her a slave, a piece of property and the mercy and whim of the male and in a state of total submission to her husband, who may even act as her abuser. She is regarded by the scriptures as the receptacle of the male seed and the means of reproducing the human race, and this is her only function." In the chapter about atheist dictators, Harrison clarified the claim about Hitler being an atheist - it's pretty clear he was not. Harrison gave eight Hitler quotes where he mentions belief in 'God'.. "[I]f my intent was to confuse, leave lots of room for interpretation, and help corrupt people do bad things, then I might supernaturally guide the production of a book that is not even a single book with a clear theme but a collection of books with disparate stories and messages... To top it off, I would drop in a few lines to say that faith, trusting, and believing without evidence are far superior to thinking and knowing. Add it all up, and I would have a surefire recipe for confusion, abuse, disagreement, and disharmony that would endure for centuries, just like the Bible." (272). The chapter on Why Hasn't the Bible Convinced More People? was good. The author argued that religion should be questioned, and we should be skeptical, and that shouldn't be socially taboo. I definitely agree. Not my favourite parts There were some chapters that didn't interest me at all, so I skipped them. What do prophecies prove?, How can we be sure that Jesus performed miracles?, Is the universe fine-tuned for us?, What has archeology proved?, Will the end times ever end?, Are angels real?, etc. Not to say these chapters are bad, just that they didn't personally interest me. The chapter on Why Do People Go to Hell? was a bit of a let-down. I was hoping the author would go away from the "is hell even real?" for a minute to discuss the MORALITY behind Hell - people often do bad things because of the bad things, like abuse, neglect, etc. that happened to THEM. This book took me more than a month to read because it is pretty long, the writing is intense (hard to digest more than a bit at a time). Would recommend to adult readers interested in reading about religion, who are interested in being critical thinkers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Edward Swalwell

    Whilst it's a common conceit among atheist argument books that the text is written for the 'theist', and to some extent I think it's true, this book is unique in that I honestly think it would be valuable for theists to read even if we accept they would not be 'converted' by anything that an atheist could argue. It's one of the few books that is useful to believers and nonbelievers both. Guy Harrison doesn't argue his point - indeed, he rarely pushes a singular 'point' - but simply does as his t Whilst it's a common conceit among atheist argument books that the text is written for the 'theist', and to some extent I think it's true, this book is unique in that I honestly think it would be valuable for theists to read even if we accept they would not be 'converted' by anything that an atheist could argue. It's one of the few books that is useful to believers and nonbelievers both. Guy Harrison doesn't argue his point - indeed, he rarely pushes a singular 'point' - but simply does as his title suggests: he poses questions. The points he raises are to explain why he believes the questions are worth asking. And by and large, he succeeds - insofar as he does raise the question, and show why it needs to be answered. He occasionally offers his own view, but mostly he just lets the questions speak for themselves. Equally, whilst Guy Harrison often goes through several possible answers and explains why he thinks the questions remain, he doesn't attempt to answer any of the questions - for atheist or theist - and just leaves the fact the questions exist to provide any argument the books has. It's telling that there's no conclusion, and the introduction sets the premise and leaves it at that - if you're looking for a philosophical, anecdotal, or logical proof - an argument or a treatise on faith or religion - then this book is probably not what you want. If you're looking for an intelligent and well-illustrated (with both data and anecdote) elucidation of the problems facing atheists, barring us from belief, the book does that well. The discussion within each question is interesting for the most part - some of the questions fell slightly flat with me (either because I knew the standard responses and they weren't moved forwards in any way, or because they echoed earlier questions) - but on the balance each was well reasoned, and Harrison covered all the reasons I count myself an atheist, and raised several that I'd never considered (and provided the evidence to back them up). It did run a bit long, but in spite of this I'd strongly recommend this book be read, and that everyone know their opinions on some of the big questions - in particular, if they consider them answered.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jamais

    Like life, the unquestioned belief should be avoided. //50 Simple Questions for Every Christian// asks Christians to look carefully at their beliefs, and posits fifty questions, ranging from such basics as whether America is a Christian nation to whether the resurrection happened. These are some great questions, and those serious about their religion should reasonably ask them at some point. However, rather than debating why they are great questions, the questions are answered by someone skeptica Like life, the unquestioned belief should be avoided. //50 Simple Questions for Every Christian// asks Christians to look carefully at their beliefs, and posits fifty questions, ranging from such basics as whether America is a Christian nation to whether the resurrection happened. These are some great questions, and those serious about their religion should reasonably ask them at some point. However, rather than debating why they are great questions, the questions are answered by someone skeptical of religion, meaning that they are answered looking to discredit religion rather than to take an honest look at it. Although the stated purpose is to build a bridge between atheists and believers, only the most patient believer is going to be able to read the entire book. It fails pretty thoroughly in its purpose of building a bridge, and pretty much demonstrates why atheists are not taken serious by the religious; such disproven chestnuts as religion being behind all wars or the religious being incapable of rational thought are pulled far too many times. This is a great book for those looking at why atheists disrespect the religious, but very little else; avoid if you are looking for any kind of actual discourse. As originally written by Jamais Jochim for the http://sanfranciscobookreview.com/.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Simple questions they may be - but they are tough ones for any Christian to answer. This is a remarkably well written book by an atheist. The author doesn't want to pick a fight engage in argument. He just wants to have a conversation with Christians to explain why non-believers have difficulty accepting the claims and world view of Christians. The questions are explored with superb clarity and show a deep understanding of Christian thought. There is no sign of antagonism and the evidence and re Simple questions they may be - but they are tough ones for any Christian to answer. This is a remarkably well written book by an atheist. The author doesn't want to pick a fight engage in argument. He just wants to have a conversation with Christians to explain why non-believers have difficulty accepting the claims and world view of Christians. The questions are explored with superb clarity and show a deep understanding of Christian thought. There is no sign of antagonism and the evidence and reasoning offered is compelling. The only (very minor) criticism is that I don't think the author's definition of irreducible complexity (an "intelligent design" concept) was accurate or fair. Apart from that, this book is a must read for anyone interested in Christian thought and the reasons for many people's genuinely held skepticism.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I will say up front that yes, i am Atheist. But i'm one of those where i have always been one, it wasn't any certain thing that pushed me into this. I have always felt this way but only recently have i identified as an atheist. I bought this book because whilst reading through it felt like he was pointing out both sides. Yes he seemed to have more of an argument on the skeptics side but never once put down any theists throughout the book, i felt like he tried to explain to skeptics as well as to I will say up front that yes, i am Atheist. But i'm one of those where i have always been one, it wasn't any certain thing that pushed me into this. I have always felt this way but only recently have i identified as an atheist. I bought this book because whilst reading through it felt like he was pointing out both sides. Yes he seemed to have more of an argument on the skeptics side but never once put down any theists throughout the book, i felt like he tried to explain to skeptics as well as to why theists think and see things the way that they do. I begged my mother to read this book so maybe she could understand why i identify as an atheist. I live in the bible belt, most people think atheists are devil worshipers or are out there to get you and try to lure them into disbelief which is so untrue. I wish that more people knew about this book. Anyone questioning their faith, or a parent that maybe wants to understand their child's point of view on theism. I honestly think this is a great book to read. It isn't harsh, it is very well articulated and is very sensitive to the theists. I think it would be great for both sides to read anyways. To have more respect for the other and it not be a battle of who is right and who is wrong. Amazing book! It stays on my bookshelf because i want my daughter(4) to try and read this when she is older. I want her to have an open mind and see both sides. I want her to explore religions. Me and her stepfather are atheists, her grandparents are theists. I honestly don't care if she is christian, atheist, Buddhist, etc.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Justin Powell

    Guy Harrison uses soft, yet precise words to get his 50 questions across in this book. What I think is one of the best parts of this book is the fact that it's conversational. Harrison poses quick, yet deep questions that should be asked of the Christian, or questions that the Christian should ask themselves. The Socratic method wins the day in this book, and Harrison conclusively shows that the atheist only need remove the foundation of the Christian by injecting logic into the assumptions of C Guy Harrison uses soft, yet precise words to get his 50 questions across in this book. What I think is one of the best parts of this book is the fact that it's conversational. Harrison poses quick, yet deep questions that should be asked of the Christian, or questions that the Christian should ask themselves. The Socratic method wins the day in this book, and Harrison conclusively shows that the atheist only need remove the foundation of the Christian by injecting logic into the assumptions of Christian beliefs. Though I did find minor errors in the book, I feel that the highlights, and often easily quotable content of the book makes me forgive them. My favorite questions would have been, 5. Who is a Christian?, 10. Have you read the Bible?, 22. Should children be Christians?, 35. Is it better to be safe than sorry?, and 47. Why does a good god allow so much suffering in the world?

  9. 5 out of 5

    TheShrike

    As opposed to some of the more aggressive "New Atheists" - Guy takes a much softer approach. In short, he starts each section with a simple question whereby showing - or at least suggesting - that religion (not even specifically Christianity) is illogical or hypocritical or contradictory. They eviscerate most religious beliefs in a gentle manner - they push you to think about the questions without forcing you to choose any specific answer. He just wants you to think about the concepts and ruminate As opposed to some of the more aggressive "New Atheists" - Guy takes a much softer approach. In short, he starts each section with a simple question whereby showing - or at least suggesting - that religion (not even specifically Christianity) is illogical or hypocritical or contradictory. They eviscerate most religious beliefs in a gentle manner - they push you to think about the questions without forcing you to choose any specific answer. He just wants you to think about the concepts and ruminate over them. For example - he asks what exactly is God. And then proceeds to explain that throughout history there have been many many different conceptualizations. How do you know which is the correct one? How do you know YOURS is the right one? Highly recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    As both a religious nonbeliever and former believer, I found this book to be polite, respectful in tone, and highly effective in disabusing me of any myths and misconceptions I may have held about those not of my former sect, who still believe and the object and subject of their belief. More importantly, I'd recommend it to the religious as well, for it raises questions that any thinking Christian should consider -- but this is more than just a book of questions and arguments. After all, skeptic As both a religious nonbeliever and former believer, I found this book to be polite, respectful in tone, and highly effective in disabusing me of any myths and misconceptions I may have held about those not of my former sect, who still believe and the object and subject of their belief. More importantly, I'd recommend it to the religious as well, for it raises questions that any thinking Christian should consider -- but this is more than just a book of questions and arguments. After all, skepticism is the enemy only of that which is false, and that which is true need fear it not!

  11. 5 out of 5

    uosɯɐS

    Any Christian who takes seriously the charge: "Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have." (1 Peter 3:15, 2nd of 3 sentences ) ...should probably read a book like this at least once in their life. And with that, I have concluded my 36 Books of 2013!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This book is a collection of responses to 50 questions you might encounter while talking to a Christian. It is nice to have this book, since it eliminates having to reinvent the wheel. The author treats Christians very gingerly so at to avoid offending them.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mike Greiner

    I think this book should actually be named "Helping Christians Understand 50 Things that Puzzle Atheists About Christianity." I liked the quick chapters and there were many good thoughts in the book, I'm just not sure it would appeal to most Christians in the way the title might assume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    If there is a book worthy of being a best-seller, it's this book. It contains all the questions I have asked about Christianity before and more. Read this book with an open mind, and one would surely grow and mature intellectually. Thumbs up.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bworth

    Great book for people who believe as well as those that don't. Why wouldn't you ask questions about Christianity (or any other faith for that matter)? We all check reviews and do our homework before purchasing something. It's a pity most people don't do the same with their religious beliefs.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Schwartz

    Well put together. It’s a little bit aggressive, so I don’t think it would actually work to give it to a Christian. The likely response would be to find the questions insulting. But it’s a pretty fun and interesting read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ette

    I skimmed this book. Much of it seemed to be covered in another book of his I did finish. However, I do appreciate his arguments on things I have questioned as well. I also like that he is very respectful in tone.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I read this book to gain a better understanding of the view of those who are skeptical of Christianity. It was a tough read since the views of the author are so very different from mine.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mya

    Recommended in Peter Boghossian's "A Manual for Creating Atheists" (p. 127).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    Some books by skeptics can be scathing and rude, but this one is not. I found it clear, considerate, and well written. I enjoyed this book a lot. Joel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Todd Watson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michaela

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jason Freeman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Straka

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 4 out of 5

    Omaha Humanist

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rhett

  28. 5 out of 5

    Orlando

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt Davis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jack Baty

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