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Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden

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This lush, creative cookbook celebrates the flavor and versatility of vegetables by bringing them to the center of the table in more than 80 delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes. Too many of us let vegetables play second fiddle in meals that center on protein or carbs. For chef Matt Wilkinson, vegetables come first. He builds his dishes around vegetables that are in season, This lush, creative cookbook celebrates the flavor and versatility of vegetables by bringing them to the center of the table in more than 80 delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes. Too many of us let vegetables play second fiddle in meals that center on protein or carbs. For chef Matt Wilkinson, vegetables come first. He builds his dishes around vegetables that are in season, when they taste the best, are most affordable, and most readily available. The recipes in Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables range from simple salads such as Brussels Sprout Leaves, Mozzarella, and Anchovies, or Roasted Cucumber, Quinoa, Freekah, and Herbs, to hearty dishes such as Soft Parmesan Polenta with Crab and Mussels, or Braised Eggplant, Tomato, and Meatballs. They also include satisfying snacks like Irene's Tzatziki, or Smoked Tomato and Goat's Curd Gougés, as well as desserts, such as Carrot Cake with Grated Carrot, Preserved Lemon, Raisin, and Ginger Pickle, or Creamed Rice Pudding. While many of the 80 plus dishes will appeal to vegetarians, there are plenty that incorporate meat. In all of them, Mr. Wilkinson's vegetables are the stars. With beautiful photography and vintage illustrations, the book is both timely and timeless. Praise for Matt Wilkinson and Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: "Matt Wilkinson makes you look at vegetables differently! This book. . . will leave you eager to prepare one of his many delicious recipes." -- Eric Ripert, chef of Le Bernardin "I love how my fellow Aussie Matt Wilkinson gives homegrown, seasonal vegetables the spotlight in his dishes. Whether you're eating in his beautiful market-driven Melbourne cafe or lazily reading through his cookbook Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables, you can taste the admiration he has for all Mother Nature has to offer." -- Curtis Stone, chef and host of Top Chef Masters and Around the World in 80 Plates "Matt Wilkinson takes vegetables to a whole new level with his recipes that are simple, yet intricate at the same time. Vegetables have never been as tasty." -- David Chang, chef/founder of Momofuku "This book is packed with inventive recipes, gardening advice, and snippets of fun vegetable lore, and it's one I'll revisit often." -- Lukas Volger, author of Vegetarian Entrees that Won't Leave You Hungry "I woke up in Melbourne and was whisked away to a studio where there was a make-shift kitchen with a couple guys putting together a meal of the most wonderful vegetables I had ever seen. There was no restaurant, no name. And that is where I met Matt and that chance meal in a warehouse behind a back alley is where one of my most special food memories remain. And now you can all see what I saw that night and maybe cook your own chance meal by Mr. Wilkinson."  -- Roy Choi, chef Kogi Taco, Food & Wine Best New Chef 2010 "This book hits home for me! The way it's organized makes it so easy for people to celebrate each vegetable during its season and even inspires us to grow them with instructions on how-to!" -- Ana Sortun, Oleana & Sofra bakery, Best Chef: Northeast 2005 James Beard Foundation


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This lush, creative cookbook celebrates the flavor and versatility of vegetables by bringing them to the center of the table in more than 80 delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes. Too many of us let vegetables play second fiddle in meals that center on protein or carbs. For chef Matt Wilkinson, vegetables come first. He builds his dishes around vegetables that are in season, This lush, creative cookbook celebrates the flavor and versatility of vegetables by bringing them to the center of the table in more than 80 delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes. Too many of us let vegetables play second fiddle in meals that center on protein or carbs. For chef Matt Wilkinson, vegetables come first. He builds his dishes around vegetables that are in season, when they taste the best, are most affordable, and most readily available. The recipes in Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables range from simple salads such as Brussels Sprout Leaves, Mozzarella, and Anchovies, or Roasted Cucumber, Quinoa, Freekah, and Herbs, to hearty dishes such as Soft Parmesan Polenta with Crab and Mussels, or Braised Eggplant, Tomato, and Meatballs. They also include satisfying snacks like Irene's Tzatziki, or Smoked Tomato and Goat's Curd Gougés, as well as desserts, such as Carrot Cake with Grated Carrot, Preserved Lemon, Raisin, and Ginger Pickle, or Creamed Rice Pudding. While many of the 80 plus dishes will appeal to vegetarians, there are plenty that incorporate meat. In all of them, Mr. Wilkinson's vegetables are the stars. With beautiful photography and vintage illustrations, the book is both timely and timeless. Praise for Matt Wilkinson and Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: "Matt Wilkinson makes you look at vegetables differently! This book. . . will leave you eager to prepare one of his many delicious recipes." -- Eric Ripert, chef of Le Bernardin "I love how my fellow Aussie Matt Wilkinson gives homegrown, seasonal vegetables the spotlight in his dishes. Whether you're eating in his beautiful market-driven Melbourne cafe or lazily reading through his cookbook Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables, you can taste the admiration he has for all Mother Nature has to offer." -- Curtis Stone, chef and host of Top Chef Masters and Around the World in 80 Plates "Matt Wilkinson takes vegetables to a whole new level with his recipes that are simple, yet intricate at the same time. Vegetables have never been as tasty." -- David Chang, chef/founder of Momofuku "This book is packed with inventive recipes, gardening advice, and snippets of fun vegetable lore, and it's one I'll revisit often." -- Lukas Volger, author of Vegetarian Entrees that Won't Leave You Hungry "I woke up in Melbourne and was whisked away to a studio where there was a make-shift kitchen with a couple guys putting together a meal of the most wonderful vegetables I had ever seen. There was no restaurant, no name. And that is where I met Matt and that chance meal in a warehouse behind a back alley is where one of my most special food memories remain. And now you can all see what I saw that night and maybe cook your own chance meal by Mr. Wilkinson."  -- Roy Choi, chef Kogi Taco, Food & Wine Best New Chef 2010 "This book hits home for me! The way it's organized makes it so easy for people to celebrate each vegetable during its season and even inspires us to grow them with instructions on how-to!" -- Ana Sortun, Oleana & Sofra bakery, Best Chef: Northeast 2005 James Beard Foundation

30 review for Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I was so excited to receive this book through a Goodreads First Reads Giveaway. The book itself is beautiful, appearing both rustic and professional at once with its unique binding. The format of the book resembles a scrapbook, with sketches and photos of the author's family interspersed with personal stories. I love the personal touches included in this book, and Wilkinson's anecdotes transport you to his childhood in England. The photography is beautiful and the dishes look delicious and heart I was so excited to receive this book through a Goodreads First Reads Giveaway. The book itself is beautiful, appearing both rustic and professional at once with its unique binding. The format of the book resembles a scrapbook, with sketches and photos of the author's family interspersed with personal stories. I love the personal touches included in this book, and Wilkinson's anecdotes transport you to his childhood in England. The photography is beautiful and the dishes look delicious and hearty. Most of them lean towards vegetarian cuisine, which I greatly appreciate as I prefer a diet that is heavy on veg. There is a wide range of types of dishes in this book, from appetizers (Salad of Radish, Figs, Walnuts & Blue Cheese) to condiments (Horseradish & Tarragon Mustard) to mains (Braised Eggplant, Tomato & Meatballs) to even dessert (Frozen Vanilla Syrup-Coated Fennel). Some of the recipes are even "twofers," giving both the main recipe and an additional recipe in order to make a complete meal, like Butternut Squash Mash with Fish Fingers. The organizing principle of the book is the names of the vegetables, which is refreshing given the vast amount of cookbooks arranged by meal component. The vegetables really are the stars of the book, and the beginning of each chapter introduces the vegetable, provides some history on it, discusses cooking techniques and varieties, and even gives growing tips. The introduction to the book stresses the importance of using ingredients when they are in season, and the book does a great job of covering vegetables that are in season throughout different times of the year. As an avid gardener, I love that this garden-to-table approach. My only critique is that many of the ingredients are either expensive or difficult to find, like rose geranium, smoked eels, and bresaola (wagyu is recommended, but that's just not going to happen in my house--sorry, Mr. Wilkinson!). It is not a book for the beginner cook, which isn't an issue for me but should be said, and is wonderful for browsing. I look forward to trying more of the recipes in this book in the future.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sara G

    Cookbooks generally fall into two categories: those we use time and again until its pages become littered with grease spots and fallen herbs, and cookbooks that are largely aspirational. The latter is for looking, not for using. Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables falls into the latter category. It is beautiful, but I would be unlikely to cook most of the meals in it. The recipes that are accessible, such as radishes with butter and herb salt, are almost too simple to require a recipe. Other recipes call Cookbooks generally fall into two categories: those we use time and again until its pages become littered with grease spots and fallen herbs, and cookbooks that are largely aspirational. The latter is for looking, not for using. Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables falls into the latter category. It is beautiful, but I would be unlikely to cook most of the meals in it. The recipes that are accessible, such as radishes with butter and herb salt, are almost too simple to require a recipe. Other recipes calls for ingredients that I am unlikely to have on hand or ever buy, like goat neck. The chatter in each chapter is delightful, and falls along the same lines. The author drops gardening hints in each, just enough to make me dream of starting my own garden and harvesting my own vegetables, but not enough information for me to actually do so. There are photos of most of the dishes, and they are all gorgeous. Each chapter begins with a collage-sketchbook type layout that I really enjoyed, and am not used to seeing in cookbooks. photography is beautiful. It’s a wonderful book to lust over, imagining that you are living Mr. Wilkinson’s life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Beautifully designed cookbook with lots of very nice photos. But the recipes are not for me. An eggplant side dish for 4 has 1 full cup of olive oil in it. The onion soup (again for 4 servings) has 2/3 cup oil and 3-1/2 tablespoons of butter, plus 5 slices of bacon. I'd be surprised if you can taste vegetables at all in many of these recipes with so much fat. Even a salad of cucumber, freekah, watercress, quinoa and herbs has 3 tablespoons of olive oil plus another 1/3 cup! Many recipes have mea Beautifully designed cookbook with lots of very nice photos. But the recipes are not for me. An eggplant side dish for 4 has 1 full cup of olive oil in it. The onion soup (again for 4 servings) has 2/3 cup oil and 3-1/2 tablespoons of butter, plus 5 slices of bacon. I'd be surprised if you can taste vegetables at all in many of these recipes with so much fat. Even a salad of cucumber, freekah, watercress, quinoa and herbs has 3 tablespoons of olive oil plus another 1/3 cup! Many recipes have meat and dairy too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Book Grocer

    Purchase Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables here for just $15! Full of recipes that range from simple salads to more complex dishes this is a must for anyone looking to eat more healthy or wanting creative ideas to incorporate vegatables. Every recipes is built around, rather than in spite of, vegetables and the book is filled with beautiful photographs and illustrations. Elisa - The Book Grocer Purchase Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables here for just $15! Full of recipes that range from simple salads to more complex dishes this is a must for anyone looking to eat more healthy or wanting creative ideas to incorporate vegatables. Every recipes is built around, rather than in spite of, vegetables and the book is filled with beautiful photographs and illustrations. Elisa - The Book Grocer

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    When the growing season comes around, there’s nothing I love more than coming into the kitchen with an armful of vegetables. Whether it’s from one of the local farmers’ markets or right outside my back door, fresh vegetables in season are at their peak of flavour, nutrition and economy. More and more chefs are embracing dishes and menus developed based on the seasonality of ingredients, rather than importing from far and wide, and Matt Wilkinson is no exception. Wilkinson is the chef at Pope Joa When the growing season comes around, there’s nothing I love more than coming into the kitchen with an armful of vegetables. Whether it’s from one of the local farmers’ markets or right outside my back door, fresh vegetables in season are at their peak of flavour, nutrition and economy. More and more chefs are embracing dishes and menus developed based on the seasonality of ingredients, rather than importing from far and wide, and Matt Wilkinson is no exception. Wilkinson is the chef at Pope Joan, known for its use of seasonal produce, in Melbourne, Australia as well as an ambassador of the Victorian Farmers’ Markets Association, and thrives on partnering with producers to provide accessibility to the tastiest food for communities. His passion translates into the cookbook world now, with Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden. Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables is more than a simple cookbook in that it incorporates not just recipes, but facts about the 24 vegetables he includes. A preamble of 2 or so pages precedes each chapter, which is dedicated to one particular vegetable – providing insight as to the Latin (“official”) name, native origin, history and even how to grow and harvest. This is fascinating for the trivia fan or gardener, but unfortunately this wealth of extra information inhibits the volume and variety of recipes Wilkinson includes. In the 300 pages of Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables, there are slightly over 80 recipes (approximately 3 per vegetable) – and some of the “produce specific” offerings (such as Simple Roast Potatoes (p. 217), Irene’s Tzatziki (p. 117) and Heirloom Radishes in a Salad (p. 244) are overly simple and better suited for the “Basics” section at the back or simply omitted entirely. Wilkinson also ignores the now-popular class of Asian produce – likely due to it’s limited locality and season. That said, Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables does promote vegetables as a main element in the diet and not simply a side. The recipes respect the foods for themselves, making them the stars of the dinner plate. While the book is useful to vegetarians looking for new twists on their meals, many recipes use meat in an accompanying role – and in most cases it can be omitted without much consequence. This book is refreshing in that while Wilkinson’s passion is evident in his food, it also doesn’t come across as a vegetarian, organic or health food manifesto. One thing that this book has no shortage of is dishes worthy of a four-star restaurant. Some of them (like Spinach, Mustard Greens, & Baked Ricotta Cheese (p. 176), Baked Beans (p. 14), and Horseradish Wafers (p. 162)), are easy and accessible enough for most home cooks to recreate, and are relatively “safe” to attempt in terms of taste expectations. Others in Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables sound delicious but intimidating, requiring specialty ingredients (truffle oil, certain spices and meats like goat neck) or processes like stovetop smoking. I’m looking forward to trying variations on some of these, however, namely the deceptively simple Sautéed Tuscan Cabbage & Matsutake Mushroom Pasta (p. 63) (though I’d have to substitute shiitakes for the Matsutake or Saffron Milk Caps called for), and the exotic, spicy Tomato Kasundi (p. 263) (using far less oil than the ¾ cup indicated for toasting the array of spices). I’m bookmarking the rich-looking Carrot Cake (p. 80) as well as the Foil Roasted Big Beets with Ricotta & Mint (p. 32) for Fall, when my backyard veggies come to fruition. For those looking to expand their vegetable-cooking horizons, impress honoured guests or simply use what you grow or buy locally, you can certainly do a lot worse than Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden. While not an exhaustive resource, Matt Wilkinson tempts and inspires with his recipes, and the collection brings to light the need to embrace vegetables in more than a fleeting embrace. From simple to gourmet, the seasons determine the supper as it has always been – what will be on your plate tonight?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    This book is a curio, something different, something strange at first glance and irritatingly more-ish. In essence this book seeks to promote vegetables as a main part of your cooking, rather than being relegated to a secondary, subsidiary role - yet without the overt, evangelical zeal of a pro-vegetarian or vegan book. For this author, seasonal ingredients are a must, a key building block for the final dish. Yes, some meaty goodness is also featured within this book too, but in a secondary role. This book is a curio, something different, something strange at first glance and irritatingly more-ish. In essence this book seeks to promote vegetables as a main part of your cooking, rather than being relegated to a secondary, subsidiary role - yet without the overt, evangelical zeal of a pro-vegetarian or vegan book. For this author, seasonal ingredients are a must, a key building block for the final dish. Yes, some meaty goodness is also featured within this book too, but in a secondary role. The book's design is quirky but without being absurd. In some ways it feels like an annotated journal thanks to the various hand-drawn illustrations. Exceptional colour photographs and a generally pleasing layout further bolster this book. Yet the key thing - the content - is interesting, even to a die-hard meat eater. It just draws you in and gets you reading, gets you thinking and in time gets you cooking. Each chapter features on a specific vegetable, mixing up detailed information and history with factoids, odd musings and - of course - a lot of recipes. The recipes themselves are well-written and laid-out, but sadly they only feature imperial measurements so you have to do your own conversions. Similarly no estimation of a typical preparation or cooking time is provided. Such small omissions that can make a subtle difference. The range of recipes was pleasing and many items have been placed on this reviewer's list of things to try. There was even a recipe for making your own baked beans (for those not familiar with this British breakfast staple, you have a treat ahead of you) - much more satisfying than buying a ready-made tin. Some of the recipes might seem strange, such as beets, celery, apple and ginger juice but hey… if you've not tried them. This ingredients-led approach worked very well. Often the burdened cook can be seeking inspiration without success, yet now you can come home from the store with a pile of fresh broccoli, for example, and immediately find something wholesome, interesting and great to try … yet perhaps in a more traditional cookery book you would have skipped past the same recipe. This book's style, approach and overall raison d'être just seems to work. Hopefully the author has something in reserve for his next book! Why not try a "different" different book today? Mr. Wilkinson's Vegetables: A Cookbook to Celebrate the Garden, written by Matt Wilkinson and published by Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers. ISBN 9781579129347, 306 pages. Typical price: CAD32.95. YYYYY. // This review appeared in YUM.fi and is reproduced here in full with permission of YUM.fi. YUM.fi celebrates the worldwide diversity of food and drink, as presented through the humble book. Whether you call it a cookery book, cook book, recipe book or something else (in the language of your choice) YUM will provide you with news and reviews of the latest books on the marketplace. //

  7. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    a most excellent 5 star read Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables I loved the cover, title and I am a veggie lover, this book is for me! The pictures are mouthwateringly beautiful. The descriptions of the foods, recipes and spices are sensual. The recipes themselves are fantastically ….”veggigasmic” I am in awe and slightly intimidated. Sheesh. What to try first.... Each section has a vegetable as it’s star, first up: Asparagus You get a description of the name, origin, native of, when to pick & plant, how to pre a most excellent 5 star read Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables I loved the cover, title and I am a veggie lover, this book is for me! The pictures are mouthwateringly beautiful. The descriptions of the foods, recipes and spices are sensual. The recipes themselves are fantastically ….”veggigasmic” I am in awe and slightly intimidated. Sheesh. What to try first.... Each section has a vegetable as it’s star, first up: Asparagus You get a description of the name, origin, native of, when to pick & plant, how to prepare, wonderful information you might never know. Just listen to the recipe names …Blanched white asparagus with ricotta & Belgian endive… A salad of raw asparagus, skordalia prosciutto & dukka. And so on and so on… recipes that blew my mind…roasted brussel sprouts with vanilla-confit chestnuts and thyme, say what? How about Sauteed Tuscan cabbage & Matsutake mushroom pasta! Or, baked long green peppers with couscous & currants…yum. Try this one.. salad of cauliflower, smoked salmon and strawberry..?!? Or, frozen vanilla syrup-coated fennel….huh? Or, horseradish wafers! How about rose-geranium-stewed blueberries with creamed rice pudding! Try; nettle & crab ravioli with swiss chard & glasswort, I am swooning…:) Parsnip chippies you say? Shepherd’s pie croquettes? Tomato kasundi? Or, salted & lemoned raw zucchini, fromage blanc & grated almond…sigh. Do you “taste” what I mean? Pairing foods that seem not to go together… Mr. Wilkinson has a Mrs. And she has a recipe as well, The Mrs. Swiss Chard & feta pie, simply scrumptious! There is also an index in the back. I have already tried the “foil roasted big beets with ricotta and mint” I think I cried a little with joy at the first bite. I am so tickled to try the pickled asparagus! I have the ingredients to try “crushed fava bean & lentils with goat cheese & pear” and “grated carrot , preserved lemon, raisin & ginger pickle’ and I am going to have this delightful “pickle” with a wedge of brie just like my new favorite Veggie man, Mr. Wilkinson says to do! As you can tell I am just thrilled with Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables, do yourself a culinary favor and get this book! I won this on goodreads for a fair and honest review

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Roth

    The fun of Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables starts at the title, continues through the whimsical, interesting layout, and on through the recipes. I found the book entertaining, engaging and sometimes confusing. I enjoyed the informative, information charming graphics surrounded by plenty of white space to highlight the artistic quality of the images. I marked many recipes for testing, the “Carrot Cake” still waits completion due to a sudden summer heat wave and busy work schedule putting me off heatin The fun of Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables starts at the title, continues through the whimsical, interesting layout, and on through the recipes. I found the book entertaining, engaging and sometimes confusing. I enjoyed the informative, information charming graphics surrounded by plenty of white space to highlight the artistic quality of the images. I marked many recipes for testing, the “Carrot Cake” still waits completion due to a sudden summer heat wave and busy work schedule putting me off heating up the kitchen. A number of other recipes did make for fabulous summer tasting. The “Grated Carrot, Preserved Lemon, Raisin, & Ginger Pickle” recipe demonstrated flexibility in pairing. We tasted it alone and added it to some pork lettuce cups. The contrast supported the slow-roasted pork. Another recipe will definitely be making an appearance at my next event. “Horseradish Wafers” is stunning. Somewhere between a frico, a cracker, and one of those shouldn’t-be-good-but-truly-is combinations. The type of recipe justifying the purchase of an entire cookbook for one bit of inspiration and useful result. This one has many applications and potentially limitless tweaks to customize your recipe. A few couple odd items also stood out. Some of the oddities appear to express the author’s current creative phrase. I found a significant number of recipes used anchovies and/or coriander. A reflection of local and empire influences from the British Isles? Sure. At the same time, I tasted recipes that would do well with a reduced amount of coriander. Anchovies also make frequent appearances. As I’m not a fan of tinned fish, this ingredient stood out significantly. The recipe for a “Salad of Radish, Figs, Walnuts, and Blue Cheese” created a tasty mélange of greens and vegetables. The dressing recipe accompanying the salad turned out to be the favorite thing discovered so far in the cookbook. “English Cream Dressing” was a lovely contrast for the salad. We ate the salad with a St. Jorge Verdeho wine. They were complimentary components. The dressing recipe is another one I’ll keep on hand. I’m already planning on trying the dressing with a spinach salad with orange segments.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Loving to both garden and cook, I thought previewing Matt Wilkinson’s new cookbook, Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables, would be a sure bet for me. I wasn’t disappointed. Wilkinson is chef at Pope Joan, a restaurant known for its use of fresh, seasonal produce, in Melbourne, Australia. As described in his first chapter, he cooks with the bounty from his garden by season. He features a vegetable in each chapter, telling us a little about its heritage and cultivation before walking us through its general p Loving to both garden and cook, I thought previewing Matt Wilkinson’s new cookbook, Mr. Wilkinson’s Vegetables, would be a sure bet for me. I wasn’t disappointed. Wilkinson is chef at Pope Joan, a restaurant known for its use of fresh, seasonal produce, in Melbourne, Australia. As described in his first chapter, he cooks with the bounty from his garden by season. He features a vegetable in each chapter, telling us a little about its heritage and cultivation before walking us through its general preparation, as well as offering recipes for its use. The recipes are straightforward and easy to follow for the seasoned cook. Some are fairly simple, such as the Sautéed Tuscan Cabbage (Kale) and Matsutake Mushroom Pasta. Some are more complicated, such as the Pea and Mascarpone Plin (rustic ravioli) With Sage and Butter Sauce. It is important to note that this is not a vegetarian cookbook, but many recipes are vegetarian friendly or could be easily adapted for vegetarian eating. Each recipe comes with specific directions and special notes or helpful hints, if needed, as well as beautiful color photos of the finished dish or meal. As Wilkinson lives in Australia and was born in Yorkshire, some of the items in his recipes might be difficult to come by here in the United States. But I expect most recipes would turn out well with a similar substitution, which he sometimes suggests. I tried several recipes in the book and all were delicious. I’m looking forward to trying more of them, as the vegetables come into season.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I mean, this book is GORGEOUS, and Matt Wilkinson is personable and funny and just really likable. And you KNOW I love my veggies. However, this just isn't a book I would ever really cook with, other than perhaps the pickle recipes. Some of the recipes feel too involved, or include too much meat, or just don't really seem all that enticing to me, and some are so simple that why even write a recipe for it? But yeah, the presentation is kind of amazing. Also really loved his advice on how to read I mean, this book is GORGEOUS, and Matt Wilkinson is personable and funny and just really likable. And you KNOW I love my veggies. However, this just isn't a book I would ever really cook with, other than perhaps the pickle recipes. Some of the recipes feel too involved, or include too much meat, or just don't really seem all that enticing to me, and some are so simple that why even write a recipe for it? But yeah, the presentation is kind of amazing. Also really loved his advice on how to read a recipe, which involved sitting down with a glass of wine, reading the recipe once, sipping more wine, reading the recipe again, sipping more wine and then writing the recipe down in a notebook in your own words so you don't have to make any notes in your cookbook if you don't want to and you kind of internalize the recipe before actually attempting it. And then sipping more wine. I mean, this makes so much sense!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This book was great to receive as a goodreads giveaway! I absolutely love vegetables and totally agree with this notion of centering your meals around the vegetable and not a meat or carbs. We haven't made anything out of it yet because most of the recipes seem rather complicated and definitely involve ingredients I don't have in my fridge or cupboards. I am excited to try something from it soon though. I don't think the recipes in this cookbook are things that will become used in my everyday co This book was great to receive as a goodreads giveaway! I absolutely love vegetables and totally agree with this notion of centering your meals around the vegetable and not a meat or carbs. We haven't made anything out of it yet because most of the recipes seem rather complicated and definitely involve ingredients I don't have in my fridge or cupboards. I am excited to try something from it soon though. I don't think the recipes in this cookbook are things that will become used in my everyday cooking, but should be good for special occasions. The book is divided into sections by vegetable and has a nice little two-page summary for each vegetable talking about its uses, history and when it is in season. The artwork is adorable and makes me want to just open it up and look at the pictures! I will definitely show this to my family members that like making fancy & complicated recipes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    I was fortunate enough to win this cookbook in a First Reads Giveaway. For now, my review is just first impressions of the cookbook itself as I just received my copy in the mail and have not yet had the chance to try any of the recipes. I like how the recipes are listed by what vegetable is the focus of the dish, which makes it easier for navigation. And as someone relatively new to cooking, I appreciate the tips for preparing each vegetables and even just discussing the differences between all t I was fortunate enough to win this cookbook in a First Reads Giveaway. For now, my review is just first impressions of the cookbook itself as I just received my copy in the mail and have not yet had the chance to try any of the recipes. I like how the recipes are listed by what vegetable is the focus of the dish, which makes it easier for navigation. And as someone relatively new to cooking, I appreciate the tips for preparing each vegetables and even just discussing the differences between all the varieties of the same vegetable (such as eggplant). The photography and layout of the images are just gorgeous and sometimes I forget that I am looking at a cookbook rather than an artbook. I would love to see a cookbook focusing on fruit done in the same fashion.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    This book is beautiful. The cover is awesome and the pictures are lovely. I can actually say that I read this cookbook not just for the recipes, but for the quirky little facts about vegetables. It is nice to know when they are in season and how to handle or prepare them. The only recipe I could actually make from the book was carrot cake with the ingredients I already had in my house. Even though there are so many recipes I want to try out, there are a few that require special trips to the stor This book is beautiful. The cover is awesome and the pictures are lovely. I can actually say that I read this cookbook not just for the recipes, but for the quirky little facts about vegetables. It is nice to know when they are in season and how to handle or prepare them. The only recipe I could actually make from the book was carrot cake with the ingredients I already had in my house. Even though there are so many recipes I want to try out, there are a few that require special trips to the store for things like sherry vinegar or crème fraîche. I am eager to try making the Spinach, Mustard Greens, & Baked Ricotta Cheese, Horseradish Wafers, Shepherd's Pie Croquettes, and Smoked Tomato & Goat Cheese Gougères.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Seldom, if ever, have I sat down and actually read a through a cookbook. Well I did with this one! Maybe it is because this book is so completely different. For each vegetable, I read a story, learned how to grow it, saw some stunning photos and got beautiful artwork paired with several recipes for how to make that vegetable into a delicious dish. The recipes are approachable, imaginative, tasty and will let me spend more time with my guests, than in the kitchen. Buy this book- for yourself or a Seldom, if ever, have I sat down and actually read a through a cookbook. Well I did with this one! Maybe it is because this book is so completely different. For each vegetable, I read a story, learned how to grow it, saw some stunning photos and got beautiful artwork paired with several recipes for how to make that vegetable into a delicious dish. The recipes are approachable, imaginative, tasty and will let me spend more time with my guests, than in the kitchen. Buy this book- for yourself or a friend- you will be glad you did.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zelly B.

    Such a cool, educational and very beautifully designed book that explores common and slightly less-than-popular vegetables. Matt Wilkinson provides a myriad of different delicious recipes to try involving vegetables such as zucchinis, carrots, fennel, onions and potatoes (among many others!). There are little anecdotes at the beginning of each vegetable-theme/chapter, and beautiful photographs to accompany them. It's a really lovely book and I'm hoping to have it in my collection in the near futur Such a cool, educational and very beautifully designed book that explores common and slightly less-than-popular vegetables. Matt Wilkinson provides a myriad of different delicious recipes to try involving vegetables such as zucchinis, carrots, fennel, onions and potatoes (among many others!). There are little anecdotes at the beginning of each vegetable-theme/chapter, and beautiful photographs to accompany them. It's a really lovely book and I'm hoping to have it in my collection in the near future!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Coyle

    This is not only a cookbook it is a work of art. From the unique cloth spine and hardboard cover to the beautiful pictures within the cookbook itself. Just a wonderful addition to my cookbook collection. M. Wilkinson gives an earthy, down-home personal view of each featured vegetable as well as some very refreshing recipes with simple ingredients and an extraordinary amount of creativity. Very grateful to have won this unique cookbook and will now have to decide if it sits within the rest ofmy coo This is not only a cookbook it is a work of art. From the unique cloth spine and hardboard cover to the beautiful pictures within the cookbook itself. Just a wonderful addition to my cookbook collection. M. Wilkinson gives an earthy, down-home personal view of each featured vegetable as well as some very refreshing recipes with simple ingredients and an extraordinary amount of creativity. Very grateful to have won this unique cookbook and will now have to decide if it sits within the rest ofmy cookbook collection or gets a spot on my "collectible books" shelf.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    LOVED the Braised Eggplant recipe! Very good and with lots of Indian spices and flavors. I made it twice already. I also made the Baked Beans (which are not baked). They were tangy and flavorful. Lots of healthy, flavorful vegetable recipes. I hope to try the Mashed Brussel Sprouts with MInt as well as the Braise of Fingerling Potatoes with Sea Bass soon. These recipes are fairly easy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    April

    This "cookbook" is a refreshing new look at all types of vegetables. Matt Wilkinson takes so many different vegetables and turns them into something new and gives you ideas on how to use them, how to handle them and of course what to cook with them. I have read recipes in here that I cant wait to try but would have never imagined ever being able to cook!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I am obsessed with this cookbook. His flavors, the precision of the preparations... I've been making recipe after recipe and each one is unique and delicious. And really, they are not that difficult or elaborate. With most cookbooks I don't follow the recipes because I know I know better but with this one, I follow Wilkinson to the letter. It's amazing. Wow.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    spine/hardback version is not kitchen friendly. not very many recipes, but i guess anecdotes re: ingredients can be interesting. I like to read cook books sometimes, but not really interested in reading this one, just making a few recipes. haven't felt compelled to do that either though.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beka

    A beautifully designed cookbook. This book not only contains lovely recipes for 24 types of vegetables, it also includes a little bit of history and growing notes for each one. Well executed and with lovely photos.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susannah

    Vegetables live up to their beautiful potential in this book. Minus 1 star because the recipes are complex and some involve weird shit like goat neck...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marie-eve

    I love this book. I browse it every week to inspire my meals for the week.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vidya Tiru

    photos that tempt and recipes that make you rush to the market and the kitchen (in that order) and wish you had a garden where everything grows.. - this is that kind of book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    kb

    this is a great cookbook! the recipes are interesting, and the photos are absolutely lovely. i enjoyed just paging through everything before even taking a look at what i could cook.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    This one earned 4 stars just coming out of the package and having a quick scan :-) After I have had a chance to try some of the recipes, I may kick it up further!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karin Timmermans

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pinky

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brandy Crowley

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