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The Intellectual Devotional: Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Roam Confidently with the Cultured Class

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This daily digest of intellectual challenge and learning will arouse curiosity, refresh knowledge, expand horizons, and keep the mind sharp Millions of Americans keep bedside books of prayer and meditative reflection—collections of daily passages to stimulate spiritual thought and advancement. The Intellectual Devotional is a secular version of the same—a collection of 365 This daily digest of intellectual challenge and learning will arouse curiosity, refresh knowledge, expand horizons, and keep the mind sharp Millions of Americans keep bedside books of prayer and meditative reflection—collections of daily passages to stimulate spiritual thought and advancement. The Intellectual Devotional is a secular version of the same—a collection of 365 short lessons that will inspire and invigorate the reader every day of the year. Each daily digest of wisdom is drawn from one of seven fields of knowledge: history, literature, philosophy, mathematics and science, religion, fine arts, and music. Impress your friends by explaining Plato's Cave Allegory, pepper your cocktail party conversation with opera terms, and unlock the mystery of how batteries work. Daily readings range from important passages in literature to basic principles of physics, from pivotal events in history to images of famous paintings with accompanying analysis. The book's goal is to refresh knowledge we've forgotten, make new discoveries, and exercise modes of thinking that are ordinarily neglected once our school days are behind us. Offering an escape from the daily grind to contemplate higher things, The Intellectual Devotional is a great way to awaken in the morning or to revitalize one's mind before retiring in the evening.


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This daily digest of intellectual challenge and learning will arouse curiosity, refresh knowledge, expand horizons, and keep the mind sharp Millions of Americans keep bedside books of prayer and meditative reflection—collections of daily passages to stimulate spiritual thought and advancement. The Intellectual Devotional is a secular version of the same—a collection of 365 This daily digest of intellectual challenge and learning will arouse curiosity, refresh knowledge, expand horizons, and keep the mind sharp Millions of Americans keep bedside books of prayer and meditative reflection—collections of daily passages to stimulate spiritual thought and advancement. The Intellectual Devotional is a secular version of the same—a collection of 365 short lessons that will inspire and invigorate the reader every day of the year. Each daily digest of wisdom is drawn from one of seven fields of knowledge: history, literature, philosophy, mathematics and science, religion, fine arts, and music. Impress your friends by explaining Plato's Cave Allegory, pepper your cocktail party conversation with opera terms, and unlock the mystery of how batteries work. Daily readings range from important passages in literature to basic principles of physics, from pivotal events in history to images of famous paintings with accompanying analysis. The book's goal is to refresh knowledge we've forgotten, make new discoveries, and exercise modes of thinking that are ordinarily neglected once our school days are behind us. Offering an escape from the daily grind to contemplate higher things, The Intellectual Devotional is a great way to awaken in the morning or to revitalize one's mind before retiring in the evening.

30 review for The Intellectual Devotional: Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Roam Confidently with the Cultured Class

  1. 5 out of 5

    Siena Mirabella

    I've got a few more pages of this left but I'm marking it as read for the year so i don't forget. I highly recommend this for anyone who loves learning & wants to incorporate it into their daily lives. I've kept up with this every day for the past year and have loved it! Best new year's habit I ever started. Can't wait to read the next edition in the new year! :) I've got a few more pages of this left but I'm marking it as read for the year so i don't forget. I highly recommend this for anyone who loves learning & wants to incorporate it into their daily lives. I've kept up with this every day for the past year and have loved it! Best new year's habit I ever started. Can't wait to read the next edition in the new year! :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Renee Amberg

    This is a wonderful concept and makes for a great coffee table book. I’m going to break up the the book by the fields of knowledge: Monday’s were history lessons: I give these a 5/5 because they were very interesting Tuesday’s were literature: I give these a 2/5 just because the literature lessons were mainly about classics and I would’ve liked to hear about modern pieces Wednesday’s were visual arts: 1/5 just because the arts were mainly about the history and the person who created them and I woul This is a wonderful concept and makes for a great coffee table book. I’m going to break up the the book by the fields of knowledge: Monday’s were history lessons: I give these a 5/5 because they were very interesting Tuesday’s were literature: I give these a 2/5 just because the literature lessons were mainly about classics and I would’ve liked to hear about modern pieces Wednesday’s were visual arts: 1/5 just because the arts were mainly about the history and the person who created them and I would've loved to learn more about the meaning or interpretations of the pieces instead Thursday’s were science: 5/5 because they were very broad and easy to understand explanations of some pretty difficult concepts Friday’s were music: 0/5 I skipped most of these because it was written in a way I didn’t understand. You have to be able to read and understand music to get these. Again, I wish it was about contemporary music rather than classics Saturday’s were philosophy: 5/5 my favorite ones to read. I just love anything that gets me thinking about thinking Sunday’s were religion: 5/5 I always found religion to be extremely interesting and hearing from all types without any bias was pretty amazing So overall 3/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Shank

    This book was great fun, and I went through it in a very particular way that I would highly suggest for anyone looking for a good time. I read it through with a friend of mine, and we made a pact to each try and comment via email on each day’s reading. That means we had 730+ emails exchanged by the time we were finished. Some topics of discussion grew into debates which lasted for a week or two (my friend and I are somewhat opinionated…but VERY brilliant). Throughout the year of this, we learned This book was great fun, and I went through it in a very particular way that I would highly suggest for anyone looking for a good time. I read it through with a friend of mine, and we made a pact to each try and comment via email on each day’s reading. That means we had 730+ emails exchanged by the time we were finished. Some topics of discussion grew into debates which lasted for a week or two (my friend and I are somewhat opinionated…but VERY brilliant). Throughout the year of this, we learned a lot about the world, about each other, about ourselves, about our threshold of tolerance for people who disagree with us, and about the depth of our compulsive “get-the-last-word” syndrome. Okay…maybe it was just me. Maybe not. But probably. I resent that. It was a very probing experience which led to new and surprising avenues of growth. At one point, as a result of my interaction with my friend, I was compelled to read a book with articles about the nature of language and communication (see my review of “Exploring Language” at http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... and at another point, as a result of the sheer delight I found in learning so many new things, I decided to further repair and refill my brain-leak of world history by taking on the slightly outdated, but thoroughly illuminating “Outline Of History” by H.G. Wells. Sometimes I ache to think about how my time in school could have been better and more happily spent, from elementary to graduate, in the ecstasy of enlightenment; but unfortunately academia is so career driven that most kids are too focused on grades and performance, and not enough on the enjoyment and thrill of discovery. Plus, I was too lazy and hormonally distracted. There’s that too. But it’s never too late! The book broke the information into different subjects for each day of the week: Monday is history, Tuesday is literature, Wednesday is visual arts, Thursday is science, Friday is music, Saturday is philosophy, and Sunday is religion. Each day’s entry is written by authors who specialize in that field, and everything was checked and edited by “scholars with advanced degrees.” Which tacitly amounts to the professor closing his book with an, “…and if there are no questions…!” As for the areas I felt most familiar with, I think it was generally a fair treatment of most topics, with some exceptions of over-generalization, personal bias, and seemingly arbitrary or needless selections here and there which possibly nudged out more pertinent content (in my humble, un-advanced-degree opinion). But as a whole I felt it was very informative and did very well to fill in gaps in my education. And it was excellent as a starting point for conversation in each area. To be sure, there will be readings that will seem completely irrelevant or laborious to cover if it is not in your area of interest—like the bore that reading about classical music became for my friend and I, even though we are relatively interested in some classical music—but we have to remember that the authors and editors are trying to get us caught up to date, even if some ideas or subjects do not seem to be as significant to people now as they used to be. Some of the art and philosophical ideas may be deemed by the reader to be absolutely detestable and useless in his repertoire for getting at the meaning of life, the universe, and everything; but as a tool to better understand one’s culture and one’s world, and to have a better foundation for conversation with people who are different from you, it is all invaluable. If you are one of those people who has newly experienced an awakening to learning and reading, and are thirsty for more information about the wonder and beauty in the world, then pick this up immediately and take it piecemeal. And take a friend with you on the journey—you’re going to want to talk about it. “Intellectual Devotional: Modern Culture”, here I come! After a little break of course.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    When I bought this book, I intended to set it by my nightstand and treat it like a devotional and read one page per day. However, I read it cover to cover, which really suited me at this time. Kidder and Oppenheim delivered exactly what was promised. Little vignettes of information on seven subjects: science, literature, philosophy, music, history, religion, and the visual arts. I learned a little about some subjects and recalled some information I had deliberately forgotten (Categorical Imperati When I bought this book, I intended to set it by my nightstand and treat it like a devotional and read one page per day. However, I read it cover to cover, which really suited me at this time. Kidder and Oppenheim delivered exactly what was promised. Little vignettes of information on seven subjects: science, literature, philosophy, music, history, religion, and the visual arts. I learned a little about some subjects and recalled some information I had deliberately forgotten (Categorical Imperative...snore fest even when boiled down to one page). I especially liked the visual arts pieces. The philosophy pieces were pretty dull - lots about logic and truth. And I appreciate that the editors tried to expand out of western culture to include some information on other cultures. Also - not a lot about women - but it seems like they did try. Also - want to hear something weird? There were a couple of really obvious errors - misspelled words, missing words, repeated paragraphs. Bizarre. Maybe they were in a hurry to hit the shelves. In any right, I'd recommend if you're into this sort of thing or if you want to be distracted a few minutes at a time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I got daily snippets of this book emailed to me from DailyLit. It was a double-edged sword -- I loved that I was able to read them in the time it takes to read an email, but hated how they only scratched the surface of some really interesting topics. Of course, the topics were also hit and miss. I got daily snippets of this book emailed to me from DailyLit. It was a double-edged sword -- I loved that I was able to read them in the time it takes to read an email, but hated how they only scratched the surface of some really interesting topics. Of course, the topics were also hit and miss.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I gotta say, I really love this book. Small and easy to keep on the night stand it is a great way to end the day. I wrote my starting date on the first page and worked my way though a page a night. Some of the content was so interesting that it was hard to not peek ahead to the upcoming pages. Occasionally I had to skip a night because of a late poker night, being sick, or some other odd reason but always made up for the lost night when I returned a day or two later. Very fun and highly recommen I gotta say, I really love this book. Small and easy to keep on the night stand it is a great way to end the day. I wrote my starting date on the first page and worked my way though a page a night. Some of the content was so interesting that it was hard to not peek ahead to the upcoming pages. Occasionally I had to skip a night because of a late poker night, being sick, or some other odd reason but always made up for the lost night when I returned a day or two later. Very fun and highly recommended. Can't wait to get the subsequent versions of the book, including history and modern culture.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    One page snippets on history, literature, visual arts, science, music, philosophy, and religion. Great way to refresh what we might already know. I read 1-2 pages a day.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven Peterson

    An interesting underlying concept. . . . The Introduction says that "Daily devotionals have long been a favored tool of those looking for a regular dose of spiritual growth." This volume? "'The Intellectual Devotional' is a secular compendium in the same tradition. It is one year's worth of daily readings that will refresh your spirit, stimulate your mind, and help complete your education." There is also a pattern: Monday's readings focus on history; Tuesday is literature day; Wednesday-visual a An interesting underlying concept. . . . The Introduction says that "Daily devotionals have long been a favored tool of those looking for a regular dose of spiritual growth." This volume? "'The Intellectual Devotional' is a secular compendium in the same tradition. It is one year's worth of daily readings that will refresh your spirit, stimulate your mind, and help complete your education." There is also a pattern: Monday's readings focus on history; Tuesday is literature day; Wednesday-visual arts; Thursday's emphasis is science; Friday is music; Saturday goes with philosophy; Sunday's specialty is religion. Maybe the best way of illustrating the nature of this volume is to randomly select a set of days (1-364). Week 8, Day 1=The spread of Islam. The one page snippet traces the spread of Islam after the death of Muhammad. The next random page is a Saturday--hence, philosophy. The school of Epicureanism is featured. As the text notes, to give a flavor (Page76): "The Epicureans therefore believed one should live mostly in an austere way, eating simple foods and enjoying only the occasional luxury." Week 18, Monday, focuses on "Spain in the New World." Here, we get a one page brief on the role of Spain in the Americas--from Christopher Columbus in 1492 onward. Page 194 is a Friday--music day. Here, we read of the composer Franz Schubert. Page 314, Saturday and philosophy. A brief one pager on existentialism, noting the work of Sartre and Camus. All in all, a nice little volume. Hardly revolutionary or eye opening. But for the person who wants to gain a bit more of a sense of our culture and key people, events, movements, etc., a nice, comfortable way of doing so. . . .

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I usually review every book I read on my on book blog, but I didn't get around to it with this book. I read this book over the course of a year. It's designed to be a daily reading in the sense that Biblical devotionals are, hence the title. I learned a great deal I didn't know, remembered some things I had forgotten, and really enjoyed this book. I took off a star because I did find some grammar/usage errors. The most common was using "lead" as the past tense form of the verb "to lead," which sh I usually review every book I read on my on book blog, but I didn't get around to it with this book. I read this book over the course of a year. It's designed to be a daily reading in the sense that Biblical devotionals are, hence the title. I learned a great deal I didn't know, remembered some things I had forgotten, and really enjoyed this book. I took off a star because I did find some grammar/usage errors. The most common was using "lead" as the past tense form of the verb "to lead," which should actually be "led." Maybe others won't notice, but it's a pet peeve, and it did decrease my enjoyment. I particularly found the philosophy and science interesting. I would recommend this book to anyone looking to learn a little bit each day.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I LOVE this book. Each page represents a day of the week and each day of the week is a different intellectual topic: History, Literature, Science, Music, Philosophy, Religion and Visual Arts. One page is dedicated to a subject under one of the aforementioned headings. So, It takes maybe, five minutes to learn something completely new. Or if you already know a little bit about the topic the book will often bear details that most would not have in the knowledge of the subject.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm reading The Intellectual Devotional over the course of 2017 (as a follow-up to reading Ken Jennings's Trivia Almanac in 2016). I'm now three weeks in and have a few remarks about it. The book is set up on a seven-day cycle, and it really works best to start the book on a Monday, rather than on the first of the year, because it labels its pages by day of the week running from Monday to Sunday. I am reading this book in a year that started on a Sunday, so I read the introduction that day and re I'm reading The Intellectual Devotional over the course of 2017 (as a follow-up to reading Ken Jennings's Trivia Almanac in 2016). I'm now three weeks in and have a few remarks about it. The book is set up on a seven-day cycle, and it really works best to start the book on a Monday, rather than on the first of the year, because it labels its pages by day of the week running from Monday to Sunday. I am reading this book in a year that started on a Sunday, so I read the introduction that day and read "Monday, Day 1" on January 2. Looking ahead, it also looks like in spite of the "365 daily lessons from the seven fields of knowledge" sticker on the front of the book, there are actually only 364 lessons (52 weeks x 7 days of the week). Each day of the week looks at a different area of study by giving you an essay about a particular figure or topic in that field of knowledge. Monday is history, Tuesday is literature, Wednesday is visual arts, Thursday is science, Friday is music, Saturday is philosophy, and Sunday is religion. I'm sure I'll learn some things over the course of this book, but my initial reaction is disappointment. I think this would be more useful for someone in junior high or high school than for an adult; I think most of this book will be summarizing things I already know (or knew at one point and forgot) rather than covering a lot of new ground. Here are some of my reactions so far: * It looks like this is not going to stray very far outside the white male canon. Flipping ahead, I've seen a grand total of three entries for women: Joan of Arc, Marie Curie, and Mary Cassatt. I haven't seen a single entry for a black person. I'm hoping some of the pages that stuck together as I flipped through will prove me wrong, but that seems unlikely. * The font size is very, very small. Each page leads off with one paragraph in text I would describe as being on the small side of normal, and then the rest of the page drops down to a radically smaller size. * I hope the music entries will get more interesting later on, but it's starting out by talking through how music works (how to read music; what is melody; what is harmony) which is incredibly, incredibly elementary if you've studied even the tiniest bit of music before.

  12. 5 out of 5

    odniko

    Good book, covering main areas and gives you the knowledge, which you didn’t even realize, that you did not knew up until now. But the only thing that i didn’t like the most is, there were barely any women mentioned. As i remember just one maybe 2 at maximum. And i hope they wrote about more women in those fields in their other books.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Braeden

    I literally carried this book around like the Bible in high school. It’s like highly curated elevator pitches of Wikipedia pages.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I read this over the course of the year as it is designed to do. It covers a topic in a general category each day: Monday -history, Tuesday - literature, Wednesday -visual arts, Thursday - science, Friday - music, Saturday - philosophy, and Sunday - religion. The topics were an interesting and informative beginning to my day all year. My only quibble is that the information is largely Western world focused. The history and literature topics cover almost entirely American or European events/peopl I read this over the course of the year as it is designed to do. It covers a topic in a general category each day: Monday -history, Tuesday - literature, Wednesday -visual arts, Thursday - science, Friday - music, Saturday - philosophy, and Sunday - religion. The topics were an interesting and informative beginning to my day all year. My only quibble is that the information is largely Western world focused. The history and literature topics cover almost entirely American or European events/people/works. Religion covers only Jewish or Christian topics through week 27. The title includes the phrase "complete your education" which is rather ridiculous. But given that title, the range of topics needs to include a more global perspective. Nevertheless the daily texts were well worth reading and made me do some in-depth research on more than one occasion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    It took me five years to finish this book. What did I learn? Lots of things, I'm sure, but the most apparent is that I can't keep myself accountable for reading 5 minutes a day. It took me five years to finish this book. What did I learn? Lots of things, I'm sure, but the most apparent is that I can't keep myself accountable for reading 5 minutes a day.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Despite its painfully pretentious subtitle ("Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Roam Confidently with the Cultured Class"), The Intellectual Devotional is not so bad. At least, it's not as bad as the title makes it sound, which is pretty bad. The idea of daily, one-page selections of information on various topics is neat, and would be neater if the publisher hadn't felt the need to put on airs. The back cover emphasis on impressing one's friends at cocktail parties is gag-worthy, and Despite its painfully pretentious subtitle ("Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Roam Confidently with the Cultured Class"), The Intellectual Devotional is not so bad. At least, it's not as bad as the title makes it sound, which is pretty bad. The idea of daily, one-page selections of information on various topics is neat, and would be neater if the publisher hadn't felt the need to put on airs. The back cover emphasis on impressing one's friends at cocktail parties is gag-worthy, and had this book not been a gift I would almost certainly not have picked it up for myself. All that said, the idea of this book is something that appeals to me, and it seems, to a lot of other people. Once you get past the covers, the daily readings are quite enjoyable, though sometimes I found the information oversimplified to the point where it bordered on inaccurate, particularly in the Religion category. Still, the readings have sometimes inspired me to look into a subject further, which is the whole point. I've enjoyed the book, but I don't see myself buying another book from the ID series. I'd just as soon keep a few good books of essays by my bed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I actually took a year to read this book one article at a time and in hindsight I believe that is probably the best way to do it. The individual articles are uneven - some are excellent, some are too short and of limited value - but overall it fulfilled its purpose. I enjoyed the variation between topics (each day of the week is a different topic, i.e. Monday = History, Tuesday = Literature, Wednesday = Visual Arts, Thursday = Science, Friday = Music, Saturday = Philosophy and Sunday = Religion) I actually took a year to read this book one article at a time and in hindsight I believe that is probably the best way to do it. The individual articles are uneven - some are excellent, some are too short and of limited value - but overall it fulfilled its purpose. I enjoyed the variation between topics (each day of the week is a different topic, i.e. Monday = History, Tuesday = Literature, Wednesday = Visual Arts, Thursday = Science, Friday = Music, Saturday = Philosophy and Sunday = Religion) and I found some of the items truly enlightening. I consider myself fairly well-read but there is enough material here for most of us to find something new and to refresh our knowledge in areas we haven't touched on in a while. I have one very nit-picky issue with the book. The tag on the cover states that there are 365 Daily Lessons from the Seven Fields of Knowledge. However, the book is broken into 52 weeks of material and that only gives the reader 52 x 7 = 364 articles. Yes, the book comes up 1 short versus the cover splash. No big deal at all, but annoying nonetheless.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book has 365 daily lessons on seven different subjects (history, literature, visual arts, science, music, philosophy, and religion). I always read more than one per day and definately liked the history and literature the best. Philosophy was pretty boring after I got the Socrates - Plate - Aristotle - Alexander the Great connections. In the back I made notes of things (mostly books) that I wanted to check out. I actually bought my first book of poetry (besides Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein This book has 365 daily lessons on seven different subjects (history, literature, visual arts, science, music, philosophy, and religion). I always read more than one per day and definately liked the history and literature the best. Philosophy was pretty boring after I got the Socrates - Plate - Aristotle - Alexander the Great connections. In the back I made notes of things (mostly books) that I wanted to check out. I actually bought my first book of poetry (besides Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein) by Langston Hughes after reading “I Too, Sing America”. This fall a new book is coming out that is on American History. I hope the trend continues with whole books on subjects, especially history and literature. I will leave this in the bathroom and start all over again. It is amazing what sticks in my mind and how much I don’t retain.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie MacDonald

    Well first let me say I bought this book years ago and tried the leaving it on my nightstand, coffee table, kitchen table, etc, and it ended up collecting dust... I just could never get motivated to read it daily no matter where I left it... UNTIL.... I let this become the one and only bathroom book! Every time you must sit *wink* read a page, each day. I am glad I read a page (or 3) a day, there are SO many awesome little tidbits of knowledge and information, such though that I have shared with Well first let me say I bought this book years ago and tried the leaving it on my nightstand, coffee table, kitchen table, etc, and it ended up collecting dust... I just could never get motivated to read it daily no matter where I left it... UNTIL.... I let this become the one and only bathroom book! Every time you must sit *wink* read a page, each day. I am glad I read a page (or 3) a day, there are SO many awesome little tidbits of knowledge and information, such though that I have shared with friends, family, social media, and also, and most importantly myself, knowing inside my own intellect is growing a little each day, no information in this book is pointless, it's even helped me grow my own to-read list... not to mention, not many people can say they get smarter every time they sh**. LOL! HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    J.C.

    Update 9/20/09: I just realized Rob and I have been "reading" this book for over a year and are barely half-way through it. We try to read one entry each night, but sometimes we take some time off from it. We can definitely tell a difference between the quality of some of the entries, like some of them were written by a great writer, and others by high school students. It's just not very enlightening, yet we keep plugging through it. update 5/22/10: We finally finished it! Many of the topics (mus Update 9/20/09: I just realized Rob and I have been "reading" this book for over a year and are barely half-way through it. We try to read one entry each night, but sometimes we take some time off from it. We can definitely tell a difference between the quality of some of the entries, like some of them were written by a great writer, and others by high school students. It's just not very enlightening, yet we keep plugging through it. update 5/22/10: We finally finished it! Many of the topics (music, science) covered things I already knew, and many of the other topics I didn't particularly care about, but I did learn a little, and most of all, it was enjoyable to spend a few minutes reading to each other every day. We hope to find a similar book to replace this one now.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dan Gladwell

    Now, I'm not all the way through yet, but I cannot tell you how much this book is my cup of tea. I absolutely love it. It's all about the presentation. The way they group into seven fields of knowledge is brilliant and makes you interested in subjects you don't already know about. I look forward the most to the music days, just because I know the least amount about music. It's a wonderful way to wake myself up every morning reading the page of the day and then re-reading before I go to bed to ma Now, I'm not all the way through yet, but I cannot tell you how much this book is my cup of tea. I absolutely love it. It's all about the presentation. The way they group into seven fields of knowledge is brilliant and makes you interested in subjects you don't already know about. I look forward the most to the music days, just because I know the least amount about music. It's a wonderful way to wake myself up every morning reading the page of the day and then re-reading before I go to bed to make sure I take in as much info as possible. This is one of those rare books where I feel it was created specifically for me because I love it so much. I can't wait to get the other versions, and continue reading over the next few years!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    It definitely expanded my knowledge on numerous subjects, but I felt there was something missing. I think they should have taken advantage of the internet and provided links for further exploration. A Youtube channel with links to all the music described in the book. I understand that this was an introductory book to the subjects, but it should have encouraged further exploration. Unfortunately, it didn't dawn on me until close to the end of the book that I should actually seek this stuff out, s It definitely expanded my knowledge on numerous subjects, but I felt there was something missing. I think they should have taken advantage of the internet and provided links for further exploration. A Youtube channel with links to all the music described in the book. I understand that this was an introductory book to the subjects, but it should have encouraged further exploration. Unfortunately, it didn't dawn on me until close to the end of the book that I should actually seek this stuff out, so I will take the blame for that. I may revisit this book and do further exploring. I think it is a good introduction to a lot of material. I would definitely recommend that readers take a little more time and explore the subjects a little more in depth with the internet.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Roche

    The book is a great concept and an ambitious endeavor, but perhaps the authors were a little over their heads when they began writing this book. For instance, many intellectual fields are left out of the book, and the fields that are presented are so light that it is unlikely to complete anyone's education. Also, a few topics are horribly written --much like a college student's late night term paper. Moreover, I have found a few instances where the points made are incorrect. Granted these errors The book is a great concept and an ambitious endeavor, but perhaps the authors were a little over their heads when they began writing this book. For instance, many intellectual fields are left out of the book, and the fields that are presented are so light that it is unlikely to complete anyone's education. Also, a few topics are horribly written --much like a college student's late night term paper. Moreover, I have found a few instances where the points made are incorrect. Granted these errors don't happen often in the book, but a book with this pretentious presentation should do well to live up to it's image. I can only hope that future editions will polish the few flaws and clean-up some poorly written pages.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeri

    Bought this book on a whim! Each day you read about something different. Just enough to explain with some trivia about it also, but not so much that it is boring. Small book like a devotional with one day on each page. Subjects come from history, literature, visual arts,science, music, philosophy, and religion. I learned a lot, remembered things I had forgotten, and solidified why when given the choice between a math course and a philosophy course, I chose math! A unique book that I Really enjoy Bought this book on a whim! Each day you read about something different. Just enough to explain with some trivia about it also, but not so much that it is boring. Small book like a devotional with one day on each page. Subjects come from history, literature, visual arts,science, music, philosophy, and religion. I learned a lot, remembered things I had forgotten, and solidified why when given the choice between a math course and a philosophy course, I chose math! A unique book that I Really enjoyed. There are other versions of this book dedicated to specific genres as well as another with sports and pop culture. Something you truly should read once a day for that rebuilding your synapses.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Monkey Man

    My wife bought this and it's been on the back of the toilet for those short-reading needs. It's in the appropriate place. For example, the entry on Charles Darwin was three paragraphs about how he tried quack remedies for his headaches, then a sentence on how he came up with "survival of the fittest." But that quote was some other guy, not Darwin. It claims to cover the "Seven fields of knowledge." Just in case you were wondering how many there were. Sorry, engineers, doctors and lawyers, you ain't My wife bought this and it's been on the back of the toilet for those short-reading needs. It's in the appropriate place. For example, the entry on Charles Darwin was three paragraphs about how he tried quack remedies for his headaches, then a sentence on how he came up with "survival of the fittest." But that quote was some other guy, not Darwin. It claims to cover the "Seven fields of knowledge." Just in case you were wondering how many there were. Sorry, engineers, doctors and lawyers, you ain't got knowledge.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Although this was designed to be listened to once a day for 365 days, I am listening to multiple entries at one time. I like it so far as it suggests various books for my to-read list and impels me to do further research on various topics. Update week four, still plugging away. Some of the entries are better than others, but it still gives you food for thought. Finished. Liked it, and will look for more by the same authors. If I had been reading the print version I don't think I would have stuck wi Although this was designed to be listened to once a day for 365 days, I am listening to multiple entries at one time. I like it so far as it suggests various books for my to-read list and impels me to do further research on various topics. Update week four, still plugging away. Some of the entries are better than others, but it still gives you food for thought. Finished. Liked it, and will look for more by the same authors. If I had been reading the print version I don't think I would have stuck with it, but the CD made it painless and fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kilian Metcalf

    I would put this in the category of a nonbook. It's a collection of small snippets of information about 7 subjects, each one designed to be read once a day. The categories in order are history, literature, visual arts, science, music, philosophy, and religion. I felt like a Jeopardy candidate cramming for an appearance. Not sure how much I have improved in my intellectual standing, but I did enjoy the little bits of knowledge. I listened to it as a recorded book, and each segment was just about I would put this in the category of a nonbook. It's a collection of small snippets of information about 7 subjects, each one designed to be read once a day. The categories in order are history, literature, visual arts, science, music, philosophy, and religion. I felt like a Jeopardy candidate cramming for an appearance. Not sure how much I have improved in my intellectual standing, but I did enjoy the little bits of knowledge. I listened to it as a recorded book, and each segment was just about 3 minutes long.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kellyn Brooks

    This was fun! I love the idea of devotionals, but had never found one that suited my taste. The authors divide up the week by subject: Monday is history, Tuesday is literature, Wednesday is visual arts, and so on. The book also shows you what week of the year you are on, which is great to help you track your progress. I enjoyed certain subjects (history, philosophy, and religion) more than others (visual arts), but that is to be expected. I love learning, and this little book filled that sweet s This was fun! I love the idea of devotionals, but had never found one that suited my taste. The authors divide up the week by subject: Monday is history, Tuesday is literature, Wednesday is visual arts, and so on. The book also shows you what week of the year you are on, which is great to help you track your progress. I enjoyed certain subjects (history, philosophy, and religion) more than others (visual arts), but that is to be expected. I love learning, and this little book filled that sweet spot for me. Would definitely recommend!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    The authors of this book took on WAY more than they could handle. Limiting oneself to just a page on topics like the French Revolution, genetics, and the Hebrew Bible is bound to leave giant holes in the information. And that's exactly what happened here. But it's still a nice reference and starting point. Except for the instances when they're just plain wrong. (But that's a minority of the time.)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Serri

    Great Christmas gift to give or put in as a stocking stuffer. Have received lots of positive feedback on it. Each day you get a one-day summary from each of the following catagories: History, Literature, Visual Arts, Science, Music, Philosophy, and Religion. They are good refreshers from what you learned in school as well as educating you on things you may have missed. If you are a Costco member, make sure you look for it there.

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