Hot Best Seller

Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition

Availability: Ready to download

Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition explores computer applications in second language acquisition by reviewing and interpreting research and development in three areas: computer-assisted second language learning, computer-assisted second language assessment, and computer-assisted second language research - addressing issues such as effective use of softwar Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition explores computer applications in second language acquisition by reviewing and interpreting research and development in three areas: computer-assisted second language learning, computer-assisted second language assessment, and computer-assisted second language research - addressing issues such as effective use of software in language teaching, values and limitations of computer-assisted testing, and the study of second language development with interactive computer programs. It offers a unique view of the topic by examining computer applications through perspectives from applied linguistics; it identifies cross-disciplinary work relevant to software development, use, and evaluation; and it suggests critical research directions. This is the first single volume on computer applications in the field which includes issues in teaching, assessment, and SLA research, and which treats evaluation extensively.


Compare

Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition explores computer applications in second language acquisition by reviewing and interpreting research and development in three areas: computer-assisted second language learning, computer-assisted second language assessment, and computer-assisted second language research - addressing issues such as effective use of softwar Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition explores computer applications in second language acquisition by reviewing and interpreting research and development in three areas: computer-assisted second language learning, computer-assisted second language assessment, and computer-assisted second language research - addressing issues such as effective use of software in language teaching, values and limitations of computer-assisted testing, and the study of second language development with interactive computer programs. It offers a unique view of the topic by examining computer applications through perspectives from applied linguistics; it identifies cross-disciplinary work relevant to software development, use, and evaluation; and it suggests critical research directions. This is the first single volume on computer applications in the field which includes issues in teaching, assessment, and SLA research, and which treats evaluation extensively.

33 review for Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    As you'll see in this review, I've been working with Computer Aided Language Learning (CALL) for the last couple of years. A colleague said I ought to read Chapelle's book, which is widely cited in the field. Well, on the positive side, it was a thorough and comprehensive study when it was written (2000) - and even though the subject has progressed since then, it still has a lot of worthwhile things to say. She is in particular good at explaining how hard it is to evaluate CALL systems objectivel As you'll see in this review, I've been working with Computer Aided Language Learning (CALL) for the last couple of years. A colleague said I ought to read Chapelle's book, which is widely cited in the field. Well, on the positive side, it was a thorough and comprehensive study when it was written (2000) - and even though the subject has progressed since then, it still has a lot of worthwhile things to say. She is in particular good at explaining how hard it is to evaluate CALL systems objectively. If someone says their system is effective in improving your skills in a language, what is an appropriate way to justify the statement? To start with, Chapelle is obviously right in dismissing most marketing claims as nonsense. No software tool is going to teach you to speak like a native in a week. In fact, if you can get a decent grasp of some basic phrases and (harder) remember when you're supposed to use them, you're doing quite well. So how should you look at the problem? I thought her core checklist was extremely sensible. If you're thinking of using some kind of software/website to help you learn a language, you could do worse than start here: Do task conditions present sufficient opportunity for beneficial focus on form? In other words, does the tool focus you on the actual structure of the language in a useful way? If you believe you can get by without this step and just "learn by doing", you're being way too optimistic. At some point, you need to do some work, though the software can make that work easier and more productive. Is the difficulty level of the targeted linguistic forms appropriate for the learners to increase their language ability? It's obvious, but also easy to miss. Make sure the tool is aimed at people who are at roughly your level. Is learners' attention directed primarily towards the meaning of the language? This is the key balancing act: you need to study the structure of the language, but if you only study grammar you'll never be able to do anything useful. Meaning has to be kept central. Is there a strong correspondence between the CALL task and second language tasks of interest to learners outside the classroom? Will learners be able to see the connection? It'll help a lot if the topics have something to do with your real life. Check to see if the situations being covered seem relevant to you personally, not to some generic language student. Will learners learn more about the target language and about strategies for language learning through the use of the task? You don't just want to pick up some phrases, you want the tool to help you understand something about the language. Not all of them do that. And ideally, it should also teach you some general skills about how to learn languages: what to focus on, how to work, how to structure your time. Are hardware, software and personal resources sufficient to allow the CALL task to succeed? Again, so obvious that you can miss it, but make sure you have tools you can actually use. There's no point buying a course that you have to run on your laptop when the only free time you have available is while driving to and from work. Maybe you'd do better with something you can put on your iPod. I don't recommend reading the book unless you're a CALL professional, but her checklist is good!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peppi Taalas

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Saad Aldawood

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ammar Elmerhbi

  6. 5 out of 5

    Neny Isharyanti

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maite

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  9. 4 out of 5

    Najebah Marafi

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jose Muñoz

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luca

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tomonori

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  14. 4 out of 5

    Panayiotis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ala Addin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Firouz

  17. 5 out of 5

    Omar Adi

  18. 4 out of 5

    Francisca Helena

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mila

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zooalnoon

  23. 5 out of 5

    أيمن المنصوري

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Peyman Navardichiyan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alsayed Alnemr

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rostik Danil

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sahiba Thaheem

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Rodrigues

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tdeen Ameed

  31. 5 out of 5

    Safa Albuali

  32. 5 out of 5

    Crispin Odek

  33. 4 out of 5

    Doan Hong

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.