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Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts

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Graphic adaptations of four of Rudyard Kipling's Just so stories for children about how the leopard acquired his spots, and other fables. Graphic adaptations of four of Rudyard Kipling's Just so stories for children about how the leopard acquired his spots, and other fables.


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Graphic adaptations of four of Rudyard Kipling's Just so stories for children about how the leopard acquired his spots, and other fables. Graphic adaptations of four of Rudyard Kipling's Just so stories for children about how the leopard acquired his spots, and other fables.

30 review for Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts

  1. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    All over the world, people have created stories explaining why the animals populating our earth look the way they do. This volume contains four of the tales collected by Rudyard Kipling in his classic book for children, Just So Stories. A different writer takes on the task of adapting each story – what ties this collection together is the illustrator, Pedro Rodriguez, as well as the work of the editor. Each of the four stories is preceded by an infographic providing some context to the character All over the world, people have created stories explaining why the animals populating our earth look the way they do. This volume contains four of the tales collected by Rudyard Kipling in his classic book for children, Just So Stories. A different writer takes on the task of adapting each story – what ties this collection together is the illustrator, Pedro Rodriguez, as well as the work of the editor. Each of the four stories is preceded by an infographic providing some context to the characters and the story. Rodriguez’ color scheme is dominated by browns, but his style is cinematic and playful in tone. He uses many page layouts and depicts the sometimes gruesome events (a rhinoceros peeling off its skin, for example) in a silly, accessible way. Although at times the violence of these stories is jarring to a modern eye, the tales are not common enough fables to be overly familiar or too well-trod. Collecting four of these stories in one volume is a smart choice, and libraries will hope that the rest of the Just So Stories are adapted into similarly engaging comics. \\pro review Cute.

  2. 5 out of 5

    HeatherIlene

    Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts is the graphic novel adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories. The graphic novel has been beautifully illustrated by Pedro Rodriguez as his style is reminiscent of Disney's The Lion King. An outstanding team of writers at Capstone worked their magic on the original stories by artfully maintaining the feel of Kipling's writing while bringing new life to the text to create a graphic novel that is both unique and fun. Rodri Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts is the graphic novel adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories. The graphic novel has been beautifully illustrated by Pedro Rodriguez as his style is reminiscent of Disney's The Lion King. An outstanding team of writers at Capstone worked their magic on the original stories by artfully maintaining the feel of Kipling's writing while bringing new life to the text to create a graphic novel that is both unique and fun. Rodriguez's use of color transports the reader to from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Red Sea to India through a safari of color. The drawings are whimsical but not so cartoonish that both parent and child can't enjoy them as the panels flow easily from one to the next. Author Rudyard Kipling illustrated the original Just So Stories in 1902, upon the book's first publishing. His pictures are in black and white with fine lines like pen and ink drawings. They are exquisite in their own right, as if you could take the individual panels, frame them, and hang them in your home as pieces of art. Just So Comics has adapted four of the original thirteen stories: * How the Leopard Got His Spots * How the Elephant Got His Trunk * How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin * How the Camel Got His Hump Each story is broken up into three parts. It starts with "Research" that includes a picture of the animal as well as facts about where he's from, what he eats, and what types of animals he hangs out with. The next section is entitled "Kipling's Observation" and recounts the way in which the animal has evolved. This section ends with the poem originally associated with the story. The third and final section, "Conclusion," shares facts and a drawing of the new and improved animal. The stories are imagined versions of each animal's origin. Author-turned-explorer Rudyard Kipling is your guide -- he's the narrator that occasionally butts in, keeps things moving, and provides the reader with useful bits information along the way. Each tale is silly and fun -- a joy to read. There was more than one laugh-out-loud moment while flipping through the pages and I often caught myself smiling. While the graphic novel is aimed at grades 3 - 6 (8 - 11 year olds), there are tidbits thrown in for adults. This would make for good reading together, parent and child, either one story at a time or all in one sitting. Verdict: I was surprised at how much I enjoyed Just So Comics. It was colorful and clever. The comic stands on its own despite being an updated version of the renown Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories. If you have a young reader in your home, this demands a place on your shelf. *A copy of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts was provided by the publisher, Capstone Young Readers, via NetGalley.com. ** A version of this review was originally posted at Classics Without All the Class: http://cwatc-bookclub.blogspot.com/20...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vidya Tiru

    Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts by Rudyard Kipling Illustrated by Pedro Rodriguez Publisher Stone Arch Books Description: Ever wonder how the leopard got his spots or how the elephant got his trunk? Well, look no further! In this comics compilation of Just So Stories, famed author and worldwide explorer Rudyard Kipling travels from the Horn of Africa to the deserts of India and discovers the truth behind four of the world’s wildest beasts. My thoughts: Rudyard Kipl Rudyard Kipling's Just So Comics: Tales of the World's Wildest Beasts by Rudyard Kipling Illustrated by Pedro Rodriguez Publisher Stone Arch Books Description: Ever wonder how the leopard got his spots or how the elephant got his trunk? Well, look no further! In this comics compilation of Just So Stories, famed author and worldwide explorer Rudyard Kipling travels from the Horn of Africa to the deserts of India and discovers the truth behind four of the world’s wildest beasts. My thoughts: Rudyard Kipling is definitely a well-loved author and even if people have not read him, many have definitely watched his stories come to like in ‘The Jungle Book’, ‘Kim’ and more. His short stories are as delightful as his novels and pack a whole lot of wit, wisdom, and oodles of fun. You can read Rudyard Kipling’s original Just Stories collection here online, thanks to Project Gutenberg. This book is a graphic adaptation of some of his ‘Just So Stories’ and they are funny even in this retelling. The comics retain the original plots but tell them with a more modern twist on them and the wacky illustrations are a perfect accompaniment to the stories. Each story has a research page in the beginning and a conclusion at the end that adds to the story. The book also includes a few fun facts on the main characters/animals at the end of each story. The stories included in comic form in this collection are the ones below: How the Leopard got his Spots How the Elephant got his Trunk How the Rhinoceros got his Skin How the Camel got his Hump My son’s comments on these stories – “They are funny and totally interesting. I laughed so hard my pants fell off. My favorite story is ‘The Lazy Camel’. “ (mine too!) Rating: B+ Reading Level: 8 to 11 years Disclaimer:Thank you to NetGalley for sending me a digital review copy of the book above. I was not compensated for my review. My thoughts on this book was in no way influenced by the author or publicist. They are my personal opinions formed when I read the book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Because of graphic novel adaptations like this, the classic stories of Rudyard Kipling may never go out of style. Although I'm not a fan of all the silliness and cartoonish quality of the humans and animals in the illustrations, I'm glad to have an updated version of the stories. I'm not sure readers will understand how Kipling was exploring the world and learning about its wonders, which resulted in tales about how four animals came to change their original appearance, the leopard adding spots, Because of graphic novel adaptations like this, the classic stories of Rudyard Kipling may never go out of style. Although I'm not a fan of all the silliness and cartoonish quality of the humans and animals in the illustrations, I'm glad to have an updated version of the stories. I'm not sure readers will understand how Kipling was exploring the world and learning about its wonders, which resulted in tales about how four animals came to change their original appearance, the leopard adding spots, the elephant stretching out its nose to have a trunk, the rhinoceros having wrinkled skin, and the camel adding a hump. Some of the stories work better in this format than others.

  5. 4 out of 5

    April

    Really terrific comic for kids. Great illustrations and story about how the leopard got his spots! I loved the art and it was really fun to read. Disclosure: This ebook was provided to me free of charge through NetGalley for the sole purpose of an honest review. All thoughts, comments, and ratings are my own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Diane Greiner

    Although the graphics in this series of books are good and so is the layout , I am not fond of the dialogue that goes along with the illustrations. Taking a classic story and translating it into graphic format is tricky and I feel this one misses the mark.

  7. 5 out of 5

    CrimsonFox

    This is refreshing and very very funny. It is severely laugh out loud funny. The sense of humour in both the writer and the artist is quite apparent. It tackles the stories in almost a MOnty-Pythonish way. Or even Bugs-Bunnyish. There is 4th wall breaking galore, self references, characters aware that they are in a story, characters that talk to the narrator...the works! I have seen other adaptions of HOw the Leopard got his spots before. THey are all the same pretty much and one-dimensional. Th This is refreshing and very very funny. It is severely laugh out loud funny. The sense of humour in both the writer and the artist is quite apparent. It tackles the stories in almost a MOnty-Pythonish way. Or even Bugs-Bunnyish. There is 4th wall breaking galore, self references, characters aware that they are in a story, characters that talk to the narrator...the works! I have seen other adaptions of HOw the Leopard got his spots before. THey are all the same pretty much and one-dimensional. This really really jazzes things up a bit. The humor so helps. Wonderfully entertaining.

  8. 4 out of 5

    wildct2003

    Excellent storytelling with words and pictures. I skipped the poems.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

    I really liked the idea behind this graphic novel, or at least what I thought was the idea, but it didn't live up to my expectations. I expected it to be a retelling in the format of a naturalist's field notebook. There is a two-page spread at the beginning of each tale that looks like a field notebook, but then it launches into a more typical graphic novel format. The credits only list one author and one illustrator, but it seemed like there were multiple adapters because the style of the stori I really liked the idea behind this graphic novel, or at least what I thought was the idea, but it didn't live up to my expectations. I expected it to be a retelling in the format of a naturalist's field notebook. There is a two-page spread at the beginning of each tale that looks like a field notebook, but then it launches into a more typical graphic novel format. The credits only list one author and one illustrator, but it seemed like there were multiple adapters because the style of the stories varied. I didn't like the first one much at all - it was very snarky and sarcastic. The rhinoceros was my favorite. One possible handicap in my reaction to the book: I had previously listened to some of these (rhino and camel) from the Rabbit Ears Radio collection, told by Jack Nicholson. So as I read this, I could hear his voice in my head. It was spot on for the rhino! But I think it negatively affected my reaction to the first two stories, even though I hadn't previously heard them.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Becky B

    Graphic novel retellings of four of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories: "How the Leopard Got His Spots," "How the Elephant Got His Trunk," "How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin," and "How the Camel Got His Hump." Each tale is accompanied by a Kipling poem. I thought the authors and illustrators did a great job of communicating the flavor and heart of each of Kipling's tales in a way true to Kipling but easier for today's readers to grasp. The illustrations were fun and helped portray the emotions of th Graphic novel retellings of four of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories: "How the Leopard Got His Spots," "How the Elephant Got His Trunk," "How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin," and "How the Camel Got His Hump." Each tale is accompanied by a Kipling poem. I thought the authors and illustrators did a great job of communicating the flavor and heart of each of Kipling's tales in a way true to Kipling but easier for today's readers to grasp. The illustrations were fun and helped portray the emotions of the animals extremely well, and also get across Kipling's subtle humorous points. I also liked the little fact profiles after each tale, giving kids some little tidbits of information on the main animals. A very enjoyable read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Good idea, less than stellar execution. Actually, it's a great idea with less than stellar execution in terms of dialogue and pretty good execution in terms of art. Kipling's original tales owe much of their charm to his phrases, O best beloved, and so many of these were left out in order to make the stories easier to read in this format (at least I'm assuming that's why they were left out). But that takes out much of the charm as well. A fun read with some nice extras for those familiar with th Good idea, less than stellar execution. Actually, it's a great idea with less than stellar execution in terms of dialogue and pretty good execution in terms of art. Kipling's original tales owe much of their charm to his phrases, O best beloved, and so many of these were left out in order to make the stories easier to read in this format (at least I'm assuming that's why they were left out). But that takes out much of the charm as well. A fun read with some nice extras for those familiar with the Just So Stories and a possible introduction to them for those who aren't, but they are no substitute.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    Interesting graphic novel adaptation to 3 of Rudyard Kipling's work. The main reason I picked this up is based on the fact if includes How the Elephant got His Trunk, which my grade six elementary school class performed as a play for the spring season. I had no clue it was an actual story so that sparked my interest right away. Overall I liked it, the colours are bright and the drawings were really well done. Interesting graphic novel adaptation to 3 of Rudyard Kipling's work. The main reason I picked this up is based on the fact if includes How the Elephant got His Trunk, which my grade six elementary school class performed as a play for the spring season. I had no clue it was an actual story so that sparked my interest right away. Overall I liked it, the colours are bright and the drawings were really well done.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kam Yung Soh

    A interesting comic adaptation of four of Rudyard Kipling's 'Just So' stories. Here you will find out how the leopard got its spots (and other assorted animals got their stripes), how the elephant got its trunk, how the rhinoceros got its skin and how the camel got its hump. Not to be taken seriously, of course, but should provide light-hearted entertainment for adults and children alike. A interesting comic adaptation of four of Rudyard Kipling's 'Just So' stories. Here you will find out how the leopard got its spots (and other assorted animals got their stripes), how the elephant got its trunk, how the rhinoceros got its skin and how the camel got its hump. Not to be taken seriously, of course, but should provide light-hearted entertainment for adults and children alike.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara Thompson

    I had expected something a little more adult than I got. It didn't make it less but unexpected. This is very much a juvenile book and quite entertaining. I would say that the younger the reader the better. The stories are just silly and fun. The art is quite colorful and simple. Even though the book seems long, it's a short read with four animal related stories. I had expected something a little more adult than I got. It didn't make it less but unexpected. This is very much a juvenile book and quite entertaining. I would say that the younger the reader the better. The stories are just silly and fun. The art is quite colorful and simple. Even though the book seems long, it's a short read with four animal related stories.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    4 Stars I have always loved Kipling’s stories about how animals evolved to what they are now. Once in a creative writing class as a kid I wrote my own about why snakes do not have feet. But, no matter how hard I try and I cannot compare to the master. I love this graphic take on his stories. The illustrations are great, they layout nice, and I love the way they introduce the characters.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A great companion to the original stories. The layout and illustrations are fun and appealing and the kid-friendly translations make the stories easy for young readers to understand, especially when read along with the original works. Fun facts at the end of each story will peak interest for further research.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bekka

    Very very cute! I thoroughly enjoyed this slightly silly retelling of Kipling's famous tales. The illustrations are wonderful. This would be a great book for children and tweens, particularly reluctant readers. They would enjoy the jokes! Very very cute! I thoroughly enjoyed this slightly silly retelling of Kipling's famous tales. The illustrations are wonderful. This would be a great book for children and tweens, particularly reluctant readers. They would enjoy the jokes!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Fun new way to introduce children to old just-so stories

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Very creative stories of how animals came to be the way they are...camels hump, elephants nose, etc.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emmaj

    Nice simple drawings. Does a decent, but not amazing, job of keeping the stories from being to racist. Good introduction to Kipling.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Claire Spurling

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Smith

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

  24. 4 out of 5

    Liam

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice Fox

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Gray

  27. 4 out of 5

    Blake Hoena

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marissa77

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janice

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Schwartzberg

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