Hot Best Seller

Three Case Histories

Availability: Ready to download

Notes upon a case of obessional neurosis (1909) Pscyhoanalytic notes upon an autobiographical account of a case of paranoia (dementia paranoides) (1911) From the history of an infantile neurosis (1918)


Compare

Notes upon a case of obessional neurosis (1909) Pscyhoanalytic notes upon an autobiographical account of a case of paranoia (dementia paranoides) (1911) From the history of an infantile neurosis (1918)

30 review for Three Case Histories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Kindo of a slog, had to read it for class. I'm really not into Freud.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    One of the “cases” included in this book is that of Daniel Paul Schreber, whom Freud never met, but upon whose memoir Freud based some of his thinking with respect to paranoia. The other two cases, the “Rat Man” and the “Wolf Man,” are based on patients with whom Freud worked. The Rat Man’s case is interesting in terms of the way that neurosis can be reflected in a subject’s language. A significant point about the case of the Wolf Man is its role with respect to Freud’s conception of the notion One of the “cases” included in this book is that of Daniel Paul Schreber, whom Freud never met, but upon whose memoir Freud based some of his thinking with respect to paranoia. The other two cases, the “Rat Man” and the “Wolf Man,” are based on patients with whom Freud worked. The Rat Man’s case is interesting in terms of the way that neurosis can be reflected in a subject’s language. A significant point about the case of the Wolf Man is its role with respect to Freud’s conception of the notion of retroaction, or nachtraglichkeit.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    A fascinating look into the Doctor/Patient relationship between Freud and three of his patients, including transcripts of sessions, Freud's musings on which methods to apply to their particular "psychoses", and the results of his application of the developing psychoanalytic method. Great read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    What I learned from this book....People are so weird.....

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ned

    dull and tedious at times, but the meat of these old psychoanalysis case histories is highly entertaining and fassssscinating.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adrian S

    The three case studies that Freud handpicked for this book, with a view of using them to demonstrate his theories, seemed to me so eccentric (and excessively sexualized) as to be of only little relevance to the psychology of the average individual. Besides the blatant sampling bias, I noticed two more shortfalls which take away from the quality of the exposition. The first shortfall is that part of the connections Freud makes between different events in the [early] lives of his patients seem far- The three case studies that Freud handpicked for this book, with a view of using them to demonstrate his theories, seemed to me so eccentric (and excessively sexualized) as to be of only little relevance to the psychology of the average individual. Besides the blatant sampling bias, I noticed two more shortfalls which take away from the quality of the exposition. The first shortfall is that part of the connections Freud makes between different events in the [early] lives of his patients seem far-fetched, and even arbitrary in some instances. Freud must have been well aware of this criticism from his more incredulous contemporaries, because he repeatedly defends himself against it with disclaimers throughout the book. In my opinion, this is evidence of a weakness of argument, because the truth should be self-evident. The second shortfall is that Freud pathologizes sexual behaviors (such as onanism and homosexuality) which nowadays, free from Victorian-era prudishness, we know to be common and entirely normal. The one thing I liked about the book, however, is that it clearly communicated the idea that humans are born with evolutionary psychological schemata which we use to organize and understand our experiences, therefore partly enslaving our minds to the reflexes accumulated and genetically passed down in the course of human evolution.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I reread the Rat man last week from a recomendation from my shrink. It is really great. It makes me wnat to make a film of it. The whole insane plan of bring A and B to the post office and paying A to pay the checkout girl and then paying B. You could do three stories. the post office bit. The story of his father and the story of the rats and of Freuds Daughter. I always feel more neurotic myself when i read these thigns. But of coure what is interesting is that the last time I read this I suffer I reread the Rat man last week from a recomendation from my shrink. It is really great. It makes me wnat to make a film of it. The whole insane plan of bring A and B to the post office and paying A to pay the checkout girl and then paying B. You could do three stories. the post office bit. The story of his father and the story of the rats and of Freuds Daughter. I always feel more neurotic myself when i read these thigns. But of coure what is interesting is that the last time I read this I suffered quite heavily from OCD and to be honest I no longer do. So it was almost nostalgic reading all the ritualistic behaviors of the ratman and remembering my own agonizing rituals. Makes me step back and at least acnowledge that progress has been made

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jgknobler

    These three case histories illuminate everything that is wrong with Freud: He believes and insists that he has unraveled psyches when he has in fact manufactured explanations and could easily have interpreted his patients' symptoms and memories in any way he chose. How did the world get snookered by this guy?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Buck

    His contention and subsequent proof that most of our psyche can trace its origin back to childhood is groundbreaking. Much of the conclusions he draws from that? A cocaine-influenced trip of loose connections and sexual obsession.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lazarus

    Sigmund relates everything to childhood “trauma”. Not a long book, and although his cases were very interesting, his breakdowns, theories, and analysis became monotonous despite their unconventialities. I don’t think you’ll find what you’re looking for out of this one.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    Serious mistake by Freud in the case of the "Wolf man". https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/bl... Serious mistake by Freud in the case of the "Wolf man". https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/bl...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eran

    A gripping psychological thriller. In these three case studies, Freud shows off in the same way that Sherlock Holmes does after unravelling a case to Dr. Watson. Each of the three case studies is contained within itself. First, Freud introduces the analysis with his patient. Quotes of his early memories, his dreams, the manifestations of his psychosis/neuroses/obsessions. It would be easy to call these people freaks. Freud's success is in humanizing them. Showing that they are suffering from deep A gripping psychological thriller. In these three case studies, Freud shows off in the same way that Sherlock Holmes does after unravelling a case to Dr. Watson. Each of the three case studies is contained within itself. First, Freud introduces the analysis with his patient. Quotes of his early memories, his dreams, the manifestations of his psychosis/neuroses/obsessions. It would be easy to call these people freaks. Freud's success is in humanizing them. Showing that they are suffering from deep psychological pain.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Reading these case studies is like only watching the end of murder mystery, where the detective explains how the crime was committed and how (s)he figured it out. It's difficult to appreciate or evaluate the conclusions without knowing the full details of the cases. That being said, I enjoyed the Schreber case the best, because I've read and loved his book. The Wolfman case was all over the place, but there were a few fascinating parts. I was largely bored by the Ratman, but "playing" the Red Kra Reading these case studies is like only watching the end of murder mystery, where the detective explains how the crime was committed and how (s)he figured it out. It's difficult to appreciate or evaluate the conclusions without knowing the full details of the cases. That being said, I enjoyed the Schreber case the best, because I've read and loved his book. The Wolfman case was all over the place, but there were a few fascinating parts. I was largely bored by the Ratman, but "playing" the Red Krayola song in my head improved things a bit.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Prakhar Bindal

    Beyond question Freud is history's most important philosopher of the mind, and he ranks alongside Eliot as the century's greatest literary critic. Modern intellectual life (left, right, and in-between) would be unthinkable without him.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Freud tends to get from 'A' to 'B' by what seems to be a psychological maze. He draws conclusions that are counterintuitive and throws them in the trash when he feels they don't suit him. However taken for what it is, it is a great insight to how we came to think about psychology today.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    I'm glad they took this off the program. A waste of my time, seriously.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amberly

    How could you not enjoy intestinal worms, causing Rat Man to express a fantasy for rodent anal rape?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott Moore

    I'm not a "Freudian", per se, but I'll engage and even enjoy his sexual obsessions and dream interpreting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Excerpts read for Literary Cultures.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Talleyrand

    [Only read "The Wolfman":]

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    There were interesting bits and absurd bits. I suppose that's all I have to say.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Parker

    These was pretty dull. I'm not into psychoanalysis all that much. Sex is to blame for everything.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Egor Sofronov

    The Truth discovered

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nico

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michele Davis

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gary Gautier

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Shohl

  28. 4 out of 5

    Automa_tom

  29. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Page

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.