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The Biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne

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The life and ministry of a young man who lived in the presence of God, and brought an overwhelming sense of that presence to men.


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The life and ministry of a young man who lived in the presence of God, and brought an overwhelming sense of that presence to men.

30 review for The Biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bambi Moore

    Dead by age 29, what a remarkable life and example of holiness and love for Christ and his people Robert Murray M’Cheyne was. “But there has been one among us who, ere he had reached the age at which a priest in Israel would have been entering on his course, dwelt at the Mercy seat as if it were his home - preached the certainties of eternal life with an undoubting mind- and spent his nights and days in ceaseless breathings after holiness, and the salvation of sinners. Hundreds of souls were his Dead by age 29, what a remarkable life and example of holiness and love for Christ and his people Robert Murray M’Cheyne was. “But there has been one among us who, ere he had reached the age at which a priest in Israel would have been entering on his course, dwelt at the Mercy seat as if it were his home - preached the certainties of eternal life with an undoubting mind- and spent his nights and days in ceaseless breathings after holiness, and the salvation of sinners. Hundreds of souls were his reward from the Lord, ere he left us; and in him have we been taught how much one man may do who will only press farther into the presence of his God, and handle more skillfully the unsearchable riches of Christ, and speak more boldly for his God.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    This biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne (a pastor who lived in the early 1800's) was written by his friend Andrew Bonar. It is a beautiful biography of a life that started out hard and was gradually transformed into an incredible example of Christ like humility and love. The first few chapters started slow. But when the book picks up, almost every page has something to learn or think about. A few of my favorite quotes: When writing to a student about studying the Bible, "Never see the face of man This biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne (a pastor who lived in the early 1800's) was written by his friend Andrew Bonar. It is a beautiful biography of a life that started out hard and was gradually transformed into an incredible example of Christ like humility and love. The first few chapters started slow. But when the book picks up, almost every page has something to learn or think about. A few of my favorite quotes: When writing to a student about studying the Bible, "Never see the face of man till you have seen His face, who is our life, our all." "If thou meanest to enlarge thy religion [life of faith], do it rather by enlarging thine ordinary devotions than thy extraordinary." The biographer goes on to say that this advice describes very accurately the plan of spiritual life on which M'Cheyne acted... "the real secret of his soul's prosperity lay in the daily enlargement of his heart in fellowship with his God." "During his years in Dundee, he often rode out in an afternoon to the ruined church of Invergowrie, to enjoy and hour's perfect solitude; for he felt meditation and prayer to be the very sinews of his work." And scattered throughout this book are little gems like "May God make the Word fire." "He wished to be always in the presence of God." "Lord, wean me from my sins, my cares, and from this passing world. May Christ be all in all to me." I especially loved the section about his trip with his eventual biographer to Palestine. It was so well written I felt I was right there, in the burning heat of the day and the frigidness of night. He made the Bible his life, often entertaining himself by making poems and memory games so he could remember things, like the different duties assigned to the Priests in the Old Testament. A few of the "to-do" sections I marked to try to incorporate in my own life I learned from his personal reformation reflections: 1. "I ought to have a stated day of confession, with fasting--say, once a month." 2. "I ought to have a number of scriptures marked, to bring sin to remembrance." 3. "I must never think a sin too small to need immediate application to the blood of Christ." 4. "I ought to have a number of Scriptures ready, which lead my blind soul directly to Christ, such as Isaiah 45, Romans 3." This book is a definite keep, take notes on, and re-read at least once a year. It is very encouraging while at the same time being very convicting, while always keeping the focus on Christ.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wes Bredenhof

    I do not easily grant a five-star rating. But this biography is exceptional. Its subject was a godly Scottish preacher whom God used mightily, even though he was only given 29 years on this earth. This biography will not only tell you the facts about M'Cheyne's life, but also speak to your soul of M'Cheyne's Saviour. This is one of the most spiritually-enriching books I've read as of late. Highly recommended! I do not easily grant a five-star rating. But this biography is exceptional. Its subject was a godly Scottish preacher whom God used mightily, even though he was only given 29 years on this earth. This biography will not only tell you the facts about M'Cheyne's life, but also speak to your soul of M'Cheyne's Saviour. This is one of the most spiritually-enriching books I've read as of late. Highly recommended!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ben Hartman

    I thought the first half of this book was rather dry and boring. The author (Bonar) was a friend of M'cheyne's, and I felt like he painted him in only a positive light, rather than this being a balanced biography. However, the last two chapters of this short book were excellent, and very spiritually encouraging, especially in the depictions of revival. It was also challenging/encouraging to me in the area of holiness, by the example of Robert Murray M'cheyne. If Goodreads gave half stars, I thin I thought the first half of this book was rather dry and boring. The author (Bonar) was a friend of M'cheyne's, and I felt like he painted him in only a positive light, rather than this being a balanced biography. However, the last two chapters of this short book were excellent, and very spiritually encouraging, especially in the depictions of revival. It was also challenging/encouraging to me in the area of holiness, by the example of Robert Murray M'cheyne. If Goodreads gave half stars, I think this book would be a three and a half. However, due to the dry writing style, I think I will have to go with a three on this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abi Kunene

    4.5 stars. Such an edifying book! It was truly a gem, which showed the short and full life of a holy man, and faithful pastor. Lots to chew on and seek to emulate. It was a bit slow at times, and left a good bit of questions regarding his life. Yet if read as a biography of His inner life and ministry, it was complete on that count. Andrew Bonar, as a friend of M’Cheyne, added in just enough personal feeling and information to be helpful. Definitely a recommended read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Enoch Thomas

    A short 29 years this saint of God lived and what can I say about him except, he loved his Savior. A zeal of the Glory of God was put in him from the moment of his conversion and its light didn’t fade until the Lord took him home. He was wholly devoted to the preaching of the Gospel to sinners and concerned for his own holiness. He realized his own sinfulness and need for private time and devotions with God. Prayer and Bible reading/study were non-negotiable. He was lived by those in his flock a A short 29 years this saint of God lived and what can I say about him except, he loved his Savior. A zeal of the Glory of God was put in him from the moment of his conversion and its light didn’t fade until the Lord took him home. He was wholly devoted to the preaching of the Gospel to sinners and concerned for his own holiness. He realized his own sinfulness and need for private time and devotions with God. Prayer and Bible reading/study were non-negotiable. He was lived by those in his flock and those who had heard him during his travels. He was used much and suffered much for the advancement of the Kingdom of God and now his reward is great. Till we meet at the feet of Christ.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Dyck

    Much different than any other biography I have read. Mr. Bonar's goal appears not to portray the life of M'Cheyne rather the depths to which he knew the living God. Very different than the approach of writer Eric Metaxas who did the biographies of both William Wilberforce and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Bonar does not give much detail in the practical things of his upbringing or his living, but only the things which are necessary to encompass his approach to preaching. Fundamental to this is how he had Much different than any other biography I have read. Mr. Bonar's goal appears not to portray the life of M'Cheyne rather the depths to which he knew the living God. Very different than the approach of writer Eric Metaxas who did the biographies of both William Wilberforce and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Bonar does not give much detail in the practical things of his upbringing or his living, but only the things which are necessary to encompass his approach to preaching. Fundamental to this is how he had communion with God. As a result, there are MANY direct quotes and journal entries of Robert. Was very refreshing! The greatest theme of the book, was the viewpoint M'Cheyne held on the doctrine of sin. He thought of himself as a worm who could only but cling to Jesus. This lead to much self reflection and many prayers of confession and blessing. He was a man of "secret" holliness and dispised any pride in the pulpit. He did not enjoy the praise he would receive from not only his congregation but also people from afar. By far the most moving portion of the book, a written account of one of M'Cheyne's reflections of his heart and life, entitled "Reformation". I reccommend this to ALL CHRISTIANS. Such depth can not be written about here. It is less than 10 pages but very impacting. There were many things lacking in this book as well. There was very little mention of the nature of his sickness as well as the response to his numerous trials. Detail was not given on many of the doctrines he held to. However, if a detailed writting already existed of such opionions, Mr Bonar pointed this out and did not want to take to duplicating such details. I was dissapointed that there was no chapter devouted to his convictions of his reading plan. He viewed it very important that his congregation read the scriptures "in all its breadth". All in all, an excellent book which I have benefited from greatly!

  8. 4 out of 5

    James

    I’ll admit this book is hard going at times. But I can’t help but give it 5 stars because of all the gems it contains. The section in the last chapter from M’Cheyne’s ‘Reformation’ is absolute gold. This quote from Bonar about him sums it up for me - “two things he seems never to have ceased from - the cultivation of personal holiness, and the anxious efforts to save souls.” Let’s pray that God will raise up more like him.

  9. 4 out of 5

    William Alderman

    One of my favorites books.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Morgan

    Wow. Spurgeon speaks accurately of this book when he says "This is one of the best and most profitable volumes ever published. Every minister should read it often." This - the life and writings of Robert Murray M'cheyne - is an incredible documentation of a man whose life was fully given to Christ, who lived in amazing intimacy with the Father, and who was deeply passionate about the pursuit of personal holiness and evangelization of the lost. Particularly moving are the last few pages that cont Wow. Spurgeon speaks accurately of this book when he says "This is one of the best and most profitable volumes ever published. Every minister should read it often." This - the life and writings of Robert Murray M'cheyne - is an incredible documentation of a man whose life was fully given to Christ, who lived in amazing intimacy with the Father, and who was deeply passionate about the pursuit of personal holiness and evangelization of the lost. Particularly moving are the last few pages that contain M'cheynes writings on personal reformation. Some points he makes in this part of his writings are as follows: 1) The persuasion that happiness, usefulness in the Kingdom, and bringing God glory are derived from continual pursuit of holiness and communion with Christ. 2) The persuasion that if anyone suggests that that the above is not true, it is the voice of the devil - God's enemy and the enemy of souls. 3) The persuasion that sins ought to be confessed, without reluctance, the moment they are seen; and they ought to be seen in the light of hell, in the light of the cross, and in the light of eternity. 4) The persuasion that sin is something away from my greatest enjoyment; my true happiness is to go to sin no more. 5) The persuasion that nothing is thriving in my soul unless it is growing. 6) The persuasion that each day ought to begin with God, to see His face first, to get my soul near Him before it is near another. It is better to have a few minutes alone with God than to give it up for lost. "Pray for me, that I may be made holier and wiser - less like myself, and more like my heavenly master; that I may not regard my life, if so be I may finish my course with joy." M'cheyne spent some time as a missionary in Palestine, during which time he wrote "A foreign land draws us nearer God. He is the only one whom we know here. We go to him as to one we know; all else is strange. Every step I take, and very new country I see, makes me feel more that there is nothing real, nothing true, but what is everlasting." "Above all things, cultivate your own spirit...what will it profit a man to gain the whole world and lose his own soul?" "I fear lest you hurt your own peace and usefulness in not praising God enough for the operation of His hands... the world loves to muse on the scenes where battles were fought and victories won. Should not we love the spots where our great Captain has won his amazing victories?"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    I decided to read this biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne after reading a book by Tozer in which he expressed high regard for M'Cheyne. Tozer considered M'Cheyne a spiritual role-model, a giant of spiritual example. That piqued my curiosity! The book itself follows the life of M'Cheyne, briefly his life before becoming a follower of Jesus and then through his ministry, to his early death at age 29. One of the strongest features of the biography is that the author, Andrew Bonar, was a close frien I decided to read this biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne after reading a book by Tozer in which he expressed high regard for M'Cheyne. Tozer considered M'Cheyne a spiritual role-model, a giant of spiritual example. That piqued my curiosity! The book itself follows the life of M'Cheyne, briefly his life before becoming a follower of Jesus and then through his ministry, to his early death at age 29. One of the strongest features of the biography is that the author, Andrew Bonar, was a close friend of M'Cheyne's. He quotes significant passages from M'Cheyne's diary and some of this letters. Therefore, a good portion of this biography is auto-biography. Personally, I did not find it to offer incredible detail into the locations or the historical context in which M'Cheyne lived and ministered. It certainly is not a novelized biography. So, it is a little dry. If it were not for the spiritual insights one finds frequently in the work it would be a difficult read due to the writing style. That said, one sees much of M'Cheyne's spiritual life. Several spiritual disciplines were a regular part of this daily life. He had a commitment to and desire to become ever more holy in his personal life. Seeing how sin and disobedience, even negligence, pained him - recorded in and reported from his personal diary - was inspiring. His philosophy of ministry is clear to see and quite a model to follow. He was Presbyterian so some of that theology comes through, but no detailed treatment of theology is in view. He lived during the Awakenings in Scotland in the 1800's and was involved in them. Exact details are lacking, but it is interesting to see. M'Cheyne's diary entries where he struggles through the end of the Awakening is very interesting. What is God's role? What influence does man have on the Awakening? Very interesting and important questions! It is an insightful read. If I were teaching classes for preachers or pastors, I think this book would be required reading. Not for the theology, but for the descriptions of a thriving spiritual life and solid philosophy of ministry.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    I read recently about this young man's life. He died in his early 30's and what I'd read mentioned that when people met him they likened it to what meeting Jesus might be like. That captivated me. Who wouldn't want to meet such a person and who wouldn't want to be such a person? So I came to this biography hoping that I'd get a good sense of how this young man had surrendered his life to Jesus and came to be 'Christ-like' to those who he met him. However, I found the book hard going. Clearly, M'C I read recently about this young man's life. He died in his early 30's and what I'd read mentioned that when people met him they likened it to what meeting Jesus might be like. That captivated me. Who wouldn't want to meet such a person and who wouldn't want to be such a person? So I came to this biography hoping that I'd get a good sense of how this young man had surrendered his life to Jesus and came to be 'Christ-like' to those who he met him. However, I found the book hard going. Clearly, M'Cheyne was captivated by Jesus, the Word, holiness and preaching the gospel. Much of the book recounted his passion for preaching and his evangelical zeal for saving souls. The rest of the book included diary entries woven in and out of Bonar's text. I found most of these diary entries to be transactional, stating what M'Cheyne did, eg, preached at such and such a church, x number of salvations. However, there were some entries particularly near the end where we get an insight into his zeal for holiness, confession and giving over his sinful nature. M'Cheyne demonstrated that continual meditation on the Word, obedience to that Word and a willingness to do whatever the Lord put in his path were instrumental to his surrendered life. He perhaps, like others who have an intimate connection with God, demonstrate that the desire for more of God and giving oneself over to the spiritual disciplines are the ingredients for such a connection. There isn't any secret sauce.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    Even though RM M'cheyne died just shy of 30, his life was one marked by enduring faith and an incessant holy walk. He was dilligent to do the work that the Lord had called him to, while still humble and conscious of the gift of grace given to him. I have been so inspired by his life and how he chose to serve the Lord to the best of his ability each day. There is so much wisdom and encouragement in reading about this man's pursuit of holiness. This book is less about his theology, but does include Even though RM M'cheyne died just shy of 30, his life was one marked by enduring faith and an incessant holy walk. He was dilligent to do the work that the Lord had called him to, while still humble and conscious of the gift of grace given to him. I have been so inspired by his life and how he chose to serve the Lord to the best of his ability each day. There is so much wisdom and encouragement in reading about this man's pursuit of holiness. This book is less about his theology, but does include some of his writings and observations about the Scriptures. It's more about his own spirit and personal walk with the Lord. Bonar's own commentary on M'cheyne's life is interspersed with M'cheyne's journal entries and personal letters. I felt that was more interesting than reading a complete transcript of his journal. Because Bonar was a personal friend and fellow minister, his writing gave me confidence that M'cheyne was respected and loved in his time and was worth learning from. This book was a hard (re: boring) read at times, especially in the beginning, but it was totally worth the perseverance. His life was evidence that there is no "hidden secret" to be used by God. He simply loved God and took the steps of obedience laid before him. He was a normal man, saved by grace through faith, who allowed himself to be used by God to impact the Scottish Church.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    Robert Murray M’Cheyne (1813-1843), was the pastor of St. Peter's Church, Dundee, from 1836 until his death in 1843. Although M’Cheyne’s life and ministry were remarkably short—he died a month before his 30th birthday—he was highly regarded in the Church of Scotland as a preacher and a man of deep personal piety and prayer. He is best known for designing a widely used plan for reading through the Bible in one year, which is my favorite plan for daily Bible reading. Bonar was afreind and fellow m Robert Murray M’Cheyne (1813-1843), was the pastor of St. Peter's Church, Dundee, from 1836 until his death in 1843. Although M’Cheyne’s life and ministry were remarkably short—he died a month before his 30th birthday—he was highly regarded in the Church of Scotland as a preacher and a man of deep personal piety and prayer. He is best known for designing a widely used plan for reading through the Bible in one year, which is my favorite plan for daily Bible reading. Bonar was afreind and fellow minister alongside M'Cheyne. His account of his life is as much a devotional work as a biography. This book was a blessed to re-read. “He did occasionally set apart seasons for special prayer and fasting . . . . But the real secret of his soul's prosperity lay in the daily enlargement of his heart in fellowship with his God. And the river deepened as it flowed on to eternity.” —Andrew Bonar on Robert M’Cheyne

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Kiedis

    What can you say? He lived more than 150 years ago. His life was a brief 29 years. Yet Robert Murray McCheyne is one who "still speaks." Two strengths to Bonar's biography: First, he allows McCheyne do much of the talking, drawing on his journal; Second, Bonar was a personal friend. His appreciation and admiration for RMM comes out, but he doesn't put his fellow preacher on untouchable holy ground. My copy is marked and multiple passages saved. What can you say? He lived more than 150 years ago. His life was a brief 29 years. Yet Robert Murray McCheyne is one who "still speaks." Two strengths to Bonar's biography: First, he allows McCheyne do much of the talking, drawing on his journal; Second, Bonar was a personal friend. His appreciation and admiration for RMM comes out, but he doesn't put his fellow preacher on untouchable holy ground. My copy is marked and multiple passages saved.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Prydden

    Robert Murray M'Cheyne's life was a light that shined briefly but that shined ever so brightly. This short biography written by his close friend Andrew Bonar is inspiring, convicting and helpful in stirring up the reader to seek the Lord in as fully and as whole-heartedly a way as M'Cheyne did, to the blessing of untold numbers. Well worth reading for anybody. Robert Murray M'Cheyne's life was a light that shined briefly but that shined ever so brightly. This short biography written by his close friend Andrew Bonar is inspiring, convicting and helpful in stirring up the reader to seek the Lord in as fully and as whole-heartedly a way as M'Cheyne did, to the blessing of untold numbers. Well worth reading for anybody.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gebriell

    Just re-read this.. amazing. The middle is slow going. The end is climatic and convicting. Oh to be more like this man. Oh to be more like Jesus Christ.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Evangeline

    Pretty good book on R.M.M. I appreciated his prayer life and his love for Jesus. He definitely knew God and had a passion for lost souls.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    Helpful insight into the life of M'Cheyne. We see what drove him to do what he did. Helpful insight into the life of M'Cheyne. We see what drove him to do what he did.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Utley

    Exceptionally challenging and encouraging. I found that it’s a book best read in a spirit of devotion. My own state of mind can deeply impact how much a book touches me. This is not a book for casual down-time, especially towards the end; it’s a book for spurring devotion, so being in that frame of mind is helpful.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Wylie

    An encouraging read. Robert Murray M'Cheyne (1813-1843) died at 29 years of age. He has many amazing quotes but my take away from the book is the following quote: An hour should never pass without our looking up to God for forgiveness and peace. This is the noblest science, to know how to live in hourly communion with God in Christ. This is what I would like to implement in to my journey during this life time. An encouraging read. Robert Murray M'Cheyne (1813-1843) died at 29 years of age. He has many amazing quotes but my take away from the book is the following quote: An hour should never pass without our looking up to God for forgiveness and peace. This is the noblest science, to know how to live in hourly communion with God in Christ. This is what I would like to implement in to my journey during this life time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Owens

    This biography of Robert Murray M’cheyne should be read by every pastor. M’cheyne is a wonderful example to every pastor. He was a man of God who was: • Committed to preaching the gospel to the lost. His goal was to preach Christ for Christ’s sake and to attract people to Christ. He would preach the gospel whenever and wherever he could. • He also was a man who had a pastor’s heart. He would spend his days visiting the people in his parish whether they were members of his church or not. He said s This biography of Robert Murray M’cheyne should be read by every pastor. M’cheyne is a wonderful example to every pastor. He was a man of God who was: • Committed to preaching the gospel to the lost. His goal was to preach Christ for Christ’s sake and to attract people to Christ. He would preach the gospel whenever and wherever he could. • He also was a man who had a pastor’s heart. He would spend his days visiting the people in his parish whether they were members of his church or not. He said some shepherds visit “to discharge his duty and to quit conscience; another makes it his delight.” He was a man who made it his delight. • He was also committed to holiness in his daily life. Andrew Bonar says of him: “Two things he seems never to have ceased from, the cultivation of personal holiness, and the most anxious efforts to save souls.” Towards the end of the book M’cheyne’s plan for personal reformation is given. This gives much insight into how much he longed to honor God by living a holy life. It is also well worth the read for anyone who is seeking to live a holy life. • M’cheyne also had a love for the Jewish people. M’cheyne, Andrew Bonar and some others traveled to Palestine in 1839 to inquire into the condition of the Jews there. On there return they traveled through Europe. Wherever M’cheyne meet anyone who was Jewish he would share the gospel with them. Andrew Bonar’s writing style in this biography is different than a lot of biographers. He mixes his comments about M’cheyne with excerpts from M’cheyne’s journal and personal letters. At first I thought this might make the book difficult to read but it ended up flowing rather well and gave much insight into the heart of Robert Murray M’cheyne.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ed N

    I usually skip right on past bible references in books. But something about this book gave me an appetite for scripture that i haven't had since i first met Jesus 8 years ago. M'cheyne's insight into God's words was wonderful, but what i found myself looking forward to as i read were the scriptures themselves that he mentioned. Again, this is not normal for me, but i'm thankful for his contagious love for the scriptures and the God revealed by them. Since reading this book, I've been more intere I usually skip right on past bible references in books. But something about this book gave me an appetite for scripture that i haven't had since i first met Jesus 8 years ago. M'cheyne's insight into God's words was wonderful, but what i found myself looking forward to as i read were the scriptures themselves that he mentioned. Again, this is not normal for me, but i'm thankful for his contagious love for the scriptures and the God revealed by them. Since reading this book, I've been more interested in digging into the Bible than into people's commentary on the Bible. Don't know if this change was initiated by the book, or just something the Holy Spirit was teaching me anyway. M'Cheyne's example sure didn't hurt - I suppose it's both- when God wants to teach us something, he often uses people and books. If you're looking for a compelling plot line or gripping story, this is not the book. But this man's obvious devotion to Jesus and his people, and the accounts of the revivals in Scotland during this time, were helpful to me in building up faith.

  24. 4 out of 5

    James

    I have two primary things to say about this book: Firstly, it speaks often of how McCheyne's solemn manner in preaching deeply impacted people. I think that this comes out in this book, through his diary entries, letter excerpts, and suchlike. The pastoral heart that he had comes out much, and it deeply humbles to see his thoughts and desires to glorify God, and to see his willingness and diligence to use his gifts in his master's service. Secondly, towards the end of the book there is a 10 page " I have two primary things to say about this book: Firstly, it speaks often of how McCheyne's solemn manner in preaching deeply impacted people. I think that this comes out in this book, through his diary entries, letter excerpts, and suchlike. The pastoral heart that he had comes out much, and it deeply humbles to see his thoughts and desires to glorify God, and to see his willingness and diligence to use his gifts in his master's service. Secondly, towards the end of the book there is a 10 page "Reformation" document that he was writing when he died. I would urge you all to read this section, if it's all that you read of this book. If you want to know how a godly man thought he should live, this is exceptional. It is full of insights into problems that get in the way of the devotional life we should have, and deceptions that the devil throws up, along with a sense of the real duties we should aspire to and long for.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Andrew Bonar was a good friend of M'Cheyne and wrote this biography within a year after M'Cheyne's death. This book benefits from the intimate knowledge Bonar had of M'Cheyne. On the other hand, this reads very differently from modern biographies, and for this reason it was rather hard for me to get into. Most of the book is driven by M'Cheyne's diary entries, so we read a lot of M'Cheyne first-hand. But the book lacks much narrative/story, and for this reason it doesn't flow very well. It would Andrew Bonar was a good friend of M'Cheyne and wrote this biography within a year after M'Cheyne's death. This book benefits from the intimate knowledge Bonar had of M'Cheyne. On the other hand, this reads very differently from modern biographies, and for this reason it was rather hard for me to get into. Most of the book is driven by M'Cheyne's diary entries, so we read a lot of M'Cheyne first-hand. But the book lacks much narrative/story, and for this reason it doesn't flow very well. It would be nice to see a more modern biography of this man.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura Morganti

    Cannot recommend highly enough. Every pastor should read this, as should every Christian. McCheyne is in my top 5 saints of old I'd love to sit next to on a bench and talk for a few hours. What a humble, holy man. I didn't want the book to end! When Bonar described his death I felt like I had lost a friend. Cannot recommend highly enough. Every pastor should read this, as should every Christian. McCheyne is in my top 5 saints of old I'd love to sit next to on a bench and talk for a few hours. What a humble, holy man. I didn't want the book to end! When Bonar described his death I felt like I had lost a friend.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I never realized the story of this man's life. I found out about him by reading Spurgeon, who made a reference to him. M'Cheyne was a wonderful example of spiritual-mindedness and sensitivity. I plan on reading this book again and learning even more from his life. I never realized the story of this man's life. I found out about him by reading Spurgeon, who made a reference to him. M'Cheyne was a wonderful example of spiritual-mindedness and sensitivity. I plan on reading this book again and learning even more from his life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Full Review - http://bookwi.se/the-biography-of-rob... Short Review - This is the biography of a 19th century Scottish pastor. About 1/3 of the book is direct quotes of his journal. It is ok, but not great. Full Review - http://bookwi.se/the-biography-of-rob... Short Review - This is the biography of a 19th century Scottish pastor. About 1/3 of the book is direct quotes of his journal. It is ok, but not great.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    A little slow through the middle, but the insight into the life and thoughts of such a holy man of God is both convicting and encouraging. More convinced than ever that holiness is what God will use in a man. Leaves me begging, God, make me holy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vaclav

    another young man, who gave his life completely to Jesus, and the ministry of the gospel work! may we wake up in our acedia, and aspire to imitate men and women of faith like Robert! or as he prayed, "Lord make me as holy as a pardoned sinner can be." another young man, who gave his life completely to Jesus, and the ministry of the gospel work! may we wake up in our acedia, and aspire to imitate men and women of faith like Robert! or as he prayed, "Lord make me as holy as a pardoned sinner can be."

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