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Fact, Fiction, and Folklore in Harry Potter's World: An Unofficial Guide

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Fact, fiction, and folklore in Harry Potter's world: covering the first five Harry Potter novels, this book presents more than one hundred entries that thoroughly examine the myths, legends, literature, and historical references of J. K. Rowling's fictional universe--Provided by publisher.


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Fact, fiction, and folklore in Harry Potter's world: covering the first five Harry Potter novels, this book presents more than one hundred entries that thoroughly examine the myths, legends, literature, and historical references of J. K. Rowling's fictional universe--Provided by publisher.

30 review for Fact, Fiction, and Folklore in Harry Potter's World: An Unofficial Guide

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicole (Reading Books With Coffee)

    The book goes into detail about the different people and myths found throughout the Harry Potter series. It’s basically the story behind the story, and I found it to be really interesting. It’s divided into 4 different sections- the fabulous beasts, famous wizards, magical objects and magical places. I thought it was organized really well, and how connected a lot of the places and things and people were to different myths, legends, and history. Each entry ranged from a few sentences to a page or The book goes into detail about the different people and myths found throughout the Harry Potter series. It’s basically the story behind the story, and I found it to be really interesting. It’s divided into 4 different sections- the fabulous beasts, famous wizards, magical objects and magical places. I thought it was organized really well, and how connected a lot of the places and things and people were to different myths, legends, and history. Each entry ranged from a few sentences to a page or two, and I was amazed at the different events and people and myths that she worked into the series. I knew that she drew on different myths and stuff, but to see how much she really drew from that was completely amazing, and made me love the series even more. The thought she put into it was something I didn’t fully realize until this book. And I would recommend to everyone, not just Harry Potter fans, because of that. I also liked the different quotes from J.K. Rowling scattered throughout the book, and it shed some light on the series as well. One of the quotes was about how she saw a big fluffy ginger cat in London in the late ’80′s that looked like it ran face-first into a wall. This cat would later become Hermione’s cat, Crookshanks. Rating: 4 out of 5. I felt like some entry’s were way to short, and others went a little longer than they should have, but overall, it was a great book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This has quite a bit of information for the Harry Potter completist. George wrote it with the young adult in mind, so he will explain terms or concepts that most literate adults will be familiar with, but which may not be familiar to the younger reader. From this I understood the extent of Rowling's cobbling together from past traditions, including standard fairy tales, Tolkien, and real languages (primarily English and French). Peppered throughout the book are interesting tidbits, websites, and o This has quite a bit of information for the Harry Potter completist. George wrote it with the young adult in mind, so he will explain terms or concepts that most literate adults will be familiar with, but which may not be familiar to the younger reader. From this I understood the extent of Rowling's cobbling together from past traditions, including standard fairy tales, Tolkien, and real languages (primarily English and French). Peppered throughout the book are interesting tidbits, websites, and other Harry Potter trivia. Occasionally, Beahm will go a bit to far, as when he explains the derivation of Professor Quirrel. He's fine when he says that the name is similar to squirrel, which connotes eccentricity. However, when he states that "Professor Quirrel's name also sounds like 'quarrel,'... This is certainly descriptive of the professor, who finds himself in an altercation with Professor Snape,..". Ouch, Mr. Beahm. When that simile snapped, I hope it didn't hurt you. But I don't hold that against Beahm ... he's got to say something, even though occasionally he works too hard. Recommended listening while reading: I'm Just Wild About Harry (Sidney Bechet's version)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cuevas

    Kind of cute, nice illustrations, but I definitely have some issues with some of the content, hilariously enough, the most startling examples of this was with the names section. There are at least three separate names that either insinuate the wrong meaning, or are described as 'created by J.K. Rowling' when a simple check through a baby name book proves otherwise. To put my money where my mouth is, first flawed example...Lucius (Malfoy). "Sounds similar to Lucifer, one of the names of the Devil Kind of cute, nice illustrations, but I definitely have some issues with some of the content, hilariously enough, the most startling examples of this was with the names section. There are at least three separate names that either insinuate the wrong meaning, or are described as 'created by J.K. Rowling' when a simple check through a baby name book proves otherwise. To put my money where my mouth is, first flawed example...Lucius (Malfoy). "Sounds similar to Lucifer, one of the names of the Devil.." Um, yes. Lucius does sound similar to Lucifer, they have the same root, the same as Lucy, Luz, and Lucia do...and all mean 'Light'. (Lucifer was the name of the angel before his fall, and means Bringer of Light) 2. Dai. Generations of Welsh men would be fascinated to be told that J.K. Rowling made up their name. 3. Demetrius. Biblical scholars must just be thrilled to understand that J.K. Rowling also had a hand in writing the Bible itself to have inserted a name that she 'made up' into it. In other words, book in desperate need of an editor, and about as weighty as popcorn.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Maloy

    This book contains a plethora of Harry Potter information all HP fans must add to their growing collections! In this "encyclopedic" HP source/reference book, readers will learn all about the characters, the places, the myths, the magic, and the beasts roaming throughout Potter's world! Beahm also delivers a powerful punch when it comes to his knowledge of folklore, mythology, and word origins (derivatives), while he explains/compares them to the creatures you find in the original J.K. Rowling wo This book contains a plethora of Harry Potter information all HP fans must add to their growing collections! In this "encyclopedic" HP source/reference book, readers will learn all about the characters, the places, the myths, the magic, and the beasts roaming throughout Potter's world! Beahm also delivers a powerful punch when it comes to his knowledge of folklore, mythology, and word origins (derivatives), while he explains/compares them to the creatures you find in the original J.K. Rowling works. In doing so, the worlds of "imagination" and "reality" become one in the readers' minds. In the Introduction, describing the phenomenon that occurs when a new HP novel is released, Beahm writes: QUOTE: "A collective hush will descend on millions of readers worldwide as they share a common yet private experience: televisions, computers, video games, radios, and cell phones will be turned off as the readers turn on to the magic of storytelling, each transported from the Muggle world to Harry Potter's magical world." :UNQUOTE Great book for HP superfans!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hanim

    Good book for a dictionary / reference type of guide to anything and everything Harry Potter. Although, I did look-up "Crookshanks" because of a rumor I read about this cat possibly being an animagus, and there was nothing in there about it... So, good guide that is not from Rowling herself. Although, I did find it very informative.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Delali

    I loved it. I got a deeper look into the Harry Potter series and I could see connection in real life and different fairytales. I loved how the author was boring about presenting t he information. I would recommend it to any Harry Potter fan.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mandi

    published before the release of book 6, this book is sorely lacking in information. the guesses printed within aren't awful, but also aren't impressive. the historical and linguistic interpretations of names are sometimes laughably off. wouldn't recommend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This was a very detailed and informational guide to the Harry Potter series but was written before the end of the series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eleni

    Because I had already read the more useful compilation by Colbert, this one for me repeated many entries; however, there were a few bits and pieces that I gleaned from it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    I enjoyed this book quite a bit, but the authors ridiculous attempts at being witty (within almost every entry, many of which were also repeated often) accomplished quite the opposite of the intended effect (at least to me). I also got annoyed that he also picked specific words to match specific characters, usually one almost exact to the character and their name (which does make sense), and then proceeded to use that same word over and over each and every time the characters name came up in oth I enjoyed this book quite a bit, but the authors ridiculous attempts at being witty (within almost every entry, many of which were also repeated often) accomplished quite the opposite of the intended effect (at least to me). I also got annoyed that he also picked specific words to match specific characters, usually one almost exact to the character and their name (which does make sense), and then proceeded to use that same word over and over each and every time the characters name came up in other parts of the book. Filch: filch. Umbridge: umbrage. Etc... He also seemed incapable of saying directly, at any point within the bloody book, that Lupin was a werewolf. I understand that he said in the intro that he was trying to minimize spoilers, but it became really irritating over the course of the book. He was trying, clearly very hard, to be subtle... It didn't work. Nor, as I stated before, did the attempts at witticism. Otherwise, I found the book quite informing about the world of Harry Potter. Detailed, but quick (as is appropriate with any form of encyclopedia) and to the point. I do wish that a bit more had been added, though. It seemed some key entries were completely disregarded. The trio is mentioned, hell, even Madame Hooch and some famous wizards who are only really mentioned on the famous Chocolate Frog cards, are given their own entries, but then other major characters are eliminated completely, hardly even being mentioned at all. Ie. Sirius Black and Cedric Diggory (all of the Triwizard Champions receive their own entries except for him? Why?)!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michaela Noblet

    Fact, Fiction, and Folklore, in Harry Potter's world was a really interesting book that goes deep inside the world of Harry Potter and really gives you the story behind alot of the characters, creatures, and objects in the books. I think Fact, Fiction, and Folklore, in Harry Potter's world was written in and exposition style because the author, George Beahm, explained where alot of the characters, creatures, and objects came from. At one point he explains that a Grim is a mythical creature that i Fact, Fiction, and Folklore, in Harry Potter's world was a really interesting book that goes deep inside the world of Harry Potter and really gives you the story behind alot of the characters, creatures, and objects in the books. I think Fact, Fiction, and Folklore, in Harry Potter's world was written in and exposition style because the author, George Beahm, explained where alot of the characters, creatures, and objects came from. At one point he explains that a Grim is a mythical creature that is a death omen that is often feared. At one point in divination class Professor Trelawney looks in to Harry's teacup to see the Grim. I liked the book alot and it was very interesting. The various pictures throughout the book also helped to describe the subjects. the way the book was set up made the book ver slow at times. Other than that the book was awsome and i would definatley reccommend it to some of my friends

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cat.

    This is aimed at the same age-level as Rowling's books are, so it's a breezy trip through the pages. There are four main sections of animals, wizards, magical things, and magical places. The only quibble (couldn't resist!) is that it's not always totally clear whether the entry in question refers to a 'real world' entity or if it's strictly a product of Rowling's imagination. Otherwise, it is an informative jaunt through Harry Potter's world. There's not really anything here that die-hard readers This is aimed at the same age-level as Rowling's books are, so it's a breezy trip through the pages. There are four main sections of animals, wizards, magical things, and magical places. The only quibble (couldn't resist!) is that it's not always totally clear whether the entry in question refers to a 'real world' entity or if it's strictly a product of Rowling's imagination. Otherwise, it is an informative jaunt through Harry Potter's world. There's not really anything here that die-hard readers of everything Potter-related won't already know, but it's nice to have it in one place rather than having to scrabble through the stories to find out who, for instance, Ernie Prang is.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Ward

    Fact, Fiction & Folklore in Harry Potter's World: An Unofficial Guide by George Beahm (Hampton Roads Publishing Inc. 2005)(823.914). This is the trivia encyclopedia of the wizarding world for the Potter fans. Much of the deep background information that J.K. Rowling embedded into the wizarding world is based on actual history, myths, or legends. This book helps sort out which is fact and which is fable. My rating: 7/10, finished 2007. Fact, Fiction & Folklore in Harry Potter's World: An Unofficial Guide by George Beahm (Hampton Roads Publishing Inc. 2005)(823.914). This is the trivia encyclopedia of the wizarding world for the Potter fans. Much of the deep background information that J.K. Rowling embedded into the wizarding world is based on actual history, myths, or legends. This book helps sort out which is fact and which is fable. My rating: 7/10, finished 2007.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Josh Harms

    Decent compendium of knowledge from the world of Harry Potter from books 1-5. Written/published before the Half-Blood Pirnce, books 6-7 weren't included. Some of the information is somewhat misinformed, but for the most part it is a fantastic reference... and includes multiple places to buy items that you see in the Harry Potter world! 4/5 would read select passages again.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    Presents the characters, objects, spells, etc. of the Harry Potter books (as of I think the 5th book) in a series of encyclopedia-like entries, analyzing the books in terms of folklore and legend sources. Enjoyable, but a glaring omission (editorial?) was an essay on Sirius Black.

  16. 5 out of 5

    RumBelle

    This book is a great resource for understanding the mythological, historical and artistic origins of many of the names J. K. Rowling used. Many of the sources I knew, but a lot, especially with the names, was new to me so I found this book highly fascinating.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Listings of creatures, (some) characters, and a bit of background. Not much "new" information, and about as much as any hard-core Potter fan could tell you without a book in hand.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tufi

    Goes for the low-hanging fruit; in one entry, the real-world magical lore was passed up for a discussion about a basic dictionary entry. Not the best companion guide out there, even for the time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I really enjoyed this book. It could have been so much better if it was written after the last book. It's a shame that this book is no longer sold.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dre McDermott

    A HP reference book perhaps for solving arguments not interesting to read alone.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Madelyn

    I only got through half of it, but that part rocked.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Merve

    Could have been more informative. the chapters were quite short and most of the time the obvious was being told. There weren't a lot of new things to real potterheads

  23. 4 out of 5

    Disha Sanjeev

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rahma Ebrahim

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Margaux Edwards

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emilia

  29. 4 out of 5

    Siah Dilley

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nur Muhammad

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