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Children of the Days: A Calendar of Human History

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Galeano's new book is his richest and most poetic yet, a joyous calendar of the sacred and the damned, a book of inspiration for those fighting tyranny, greed, and amnesia. Unfurling like a medieval book of days, each page of Galeano's new work has an illuminating story that takes inspiration from that day of the calendar year. Each entry resurrects the heroes and heroines Galeano's new book is his richest and most poetic yet, a joyous calendar of the sacred and the damned, a book of inspiration for those fighting tyranny, greed, and amnesia. Unfurling like a medieval book of days, each page of Galeano's new work has an illuminating story that takes inspiration from that day of the calendar year. Each entry resurrects the heroes and heroines who have fallen off the historical map. Among many others, you will discover the Brazilians who held a "smooch in" to protest a dictatorship that banned kisses, the "sacrilegious" women who had the effrontery to marry each other in a church in 1901, and Abdul Kassem Ismael, the grand vizier of Persia, who kept books safe from war by creating a walking library, 117,000 books aboard four hundred camels, forming a mile-long caravan. Beautifully translated by Galeano's longtime collaborator, Mark Fried, Children of the Days is a great humanist treasure that shows us how to live and how to remember. It awakens the best in us.


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Galeano's new book is his richest and most poetic yet, a joyous calendar of the sacred and the damned, a book of inspiration for those fighting tyranny, greed, and amnesia. Unfurling like a medieval book of days, each page of Galeano's new work has an illuminating story that takes inspiration from that day of the calendar year. Each entry resurrects the heroes and heroines Galeano's new book is his richest and most poetic yet, a joyous calendar of the sacred and the damned, a book of inspiration for those fighting tyranny, greed, and amnesia. Unfurling like a medieval book of days, each page of Galeano's new work has an illuminating story that takes inspiration from that day of the calendar year. Each entry resurrects the heroes and heroines who have fallen off the historical map. Among many others, you will discover the Brazilians who held a "smooch in" to protest a dictatorship that banned kisses, the "sacrilegious" women who had the effrontery to marry each other in a church in 1901, and Abdul Kassem Ismael, the grand vizier of Persia, who kept books safe from war by creating a walking library, 117,000 books aboard four hundred camels, forming a mile-long caravan. Beautifully translated by Galeano's longtime collaborator, Mark Fried, Children of the Days is a great humanist treasure that shows us how to live and how to remember. It awakens the best in us.

30 review for Children of the Days: A Calendar of Human History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Russell

    Taking the form of a medieval book of days, we have Eduardo Galeano's celebration of human dignity, artistic achievement and scientific discovery along with sharp zingers fired at anything smacking of racism, sexism, religious fanaticism, corporate manipulation, political power plays and the poisoning of minds, spirt, air, land and water. Of the 365, one for each day of the year, here are 10 of my favorites. I have also included several sidebars recounting my own experiences on the topics addres Taking the form of a medieval book of days, we have Eduardo Galeano's celebration of human dignity, artistic achievement and scientific discovery along with sharp zingers fired at anything smacking of racism, sexism, religious fanaticism, corporate manipulation, political power plays and the poisoning of minds, spirt, air, land and water. Of the 365, one for each day of the year, here are 10 of my favorites. I have also included several sidebars recounting my own experiences on the topics addressed. Enjoy! JANUARY 27 - OPEN YOUR EARS On this day in 1756, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born. Centuries later, even babies love the music he left us. It has been proven time and again that newborns cry less and sleep better when they listen to Mozart. His come to the world is the best way of telling them, “This is your new home. And this is how it sounds.” FEBRUARY 13 – THE DANGER OF PLAYING In the year 2008, Miguel Lopez Rocha, who was fooling around on the outskirts of the Mexican city of Guadalajara, slipped and fell into the Santiago River. Miguel was eight years old. He did not drown. He was poisoned. The river contained arsenic, sulfuric acid, mercury, chromium, lead and furans, dumped into its waters by Aventis, Bayer, Nestle, IBM, DuPont, Xerox, United Plastics, Celanese, and other countries that prohibit such largesse. Sidebar: Back in the 1950s the river a block away from my home in Beachwood, just south of Toms River in Central New Jersey, was clean and clear one summer and a disgusting dirty brown polluted the next.. People from the community and government agencies have been waging an ongoing battle with the local chemical company, Ciba-Giegy, for decades. The book Toms River addresses this subject. MARCH 6 – THE FLORIST Georgia O’Keeffe lived and painted for nearly a century and died still painting. She raised a garden of painting in the solitude of the desert. Georgia’s flowers – clitoris, vulva, vagina, nipple, belly button – were chalices for a thanksgiving mass for the joy of having been born a woman. MAY 17 – HOME The twenty-first century has been walking through time for a few years now, and the number of people without adequate housing has reached one billion. To solve this problem, experts are looking into the Christian example of Saint Simeon Stylities, who lived for thirty-seven years atop a column. In the morning Saint Simeon would come down to pray and at night he would tie himself down, so he wouldn’t tumble off in his sleep. Sidebar: Eduardo Galeano’s black humor has an undeniable edge when I recall how last year a college instructor specializing in geography and population told me that if the current human birth explosion continues at its current exponential rate, in fifty years there will be standing room only. (The current worldwide human population is well over seven billion, enough people to fill over 800 New York Cities. Now that's a lot of people!) JUNE 28 - HELL Back in the year 960, Christian missionaries invaded Scandinavia and threatened the Vikings: if you persist in your pagan customs you will end up in hell where eternal fires burn. The Vikings welcomed the good news. They trembled from cold, not fear. JULY 25 – RECIPE FOR SPREADING THE PLAGUE In the fourteenth century fanatical custodians of the Catholic faith declared war on cat in Europe’s cities. These diabolical animals, instruments of Satan, were crucified, skewered, skinned alive or chucked into bonfires. Then the rats, liberated from their worst enemies, came to rule the cities. And the Black Death, transmitted by rats, killed thirty million Europeans. AUGUST 18 – THE NETWORK OF NETWORKS Around this time in 1969, a group of scientists in the US armed forces started up a new project: they were going to create a network of networks to connect and coordinate military operations on a scale never before seen. In the war to conquer heaven and earth, this invention, not yet called the internet, turned into a victory for the United States against its rival power, still called the Soviet Union. Paradoxically, with the passing of the years, this instrument of war has also served to amplify the voices of peace, which previously resounded like a wooden bell. Sidebar: So true, Eduardo! If some blowhard buffoon of a political leader started blabbing publicly about the virtues of war or making remarks about racial superiority, how long would it take for those statements to reach the worldwide internet and be read by this young man at his local school in Peru and others anywhere on the globe? Good riddance, pre-internet world! OCTOBER 14 – A DEFEAT FOR CIVILIZATION In the year 2002, eight McDonald’s restaurants closed their doors in Bolivia. Barely five years had this civilizing mission lasted. No one forced McDonald’s out. Bolivians simply turned their back, or better put, McDonald’s turned their stomachs. The most successful company on the planet had generously graced the country with its presence, and these ingrates refused to acknowledge the gesture. A distaste for progress dissuaded Bolivia from embracing either junk food or the dizzying pace of contemporary life. Homemade empanadas derailed development. Bolivians stubbornly attached to the ancient flavors of the family hearth, continue eating without haste in long, slow ceremonies. Gone forever is the company that everywhere else makes children happy, fires workers who try to unionize and jacks up the rate of obesity. Sidebar: Some months ago, I recall reading the headlines in the local newspaper of how one employee in a nearby McDonald’s was arrested for selling drugs while taking orders from customers. “Would you care for some opiates or pep pills to go along with your burger and fries?” Goodness. I wonder if his McDonald’s nonunion wage had something to do with his trying to pull off that stunt. NOVEMBER 10 – WORLD SCIENCE DAY Brazilian physician Drauzio Varella calculated that the world invests five times as much in male sex stimulants and female silicone implants as in finding a cure for Alzheimer’s. “In a few years,” he prophesized, “we will have old women with huge tits and old men with stiff cocks, but none of them will remember what they are for.” DECEMBER 11 – THE POET WHO WAS A CROWD Fernando Pessoa, the poet from Portugal, believed he lived with five or six other poets inside him. At the end of 2010 the Brazilian writer José Paulo Cavalcanti completed his many years of research on “someone who dreamed he was many.” Cavalcanti discovered that Pessoa did not contain five or even six: he had one hundred and twenty-seven guests in his capacious body, each with his own name, style and history, birth date and horoscope. His one hundred and twenty-seven inhabitants signed poems, articles, letters, essays, books . . . Several of them published vituperous criticisms of him, but Pessoa never kicked any of them out, even if it was not easy to keep such a large family fed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    It would be wrong for me, of all people, to criticize Galeano for being glib, and selective, preachy and sometimes angry.* He's all those things; and passionate, and poetic, with an ear for injustice if too willing to pass along apocrypha, and quite funny, and sometimes just plain wrong. Yet, when I think of coming generations, numbed by soundbites and political correctness, I would like to make it mandatory that every child should read Galeano. Because we should teach irony and sarcasm, and the It would be wrong for me, of all people, to criticize Galeano for being glib, and selective, preachy and sometimes angry.* He's all those things; and passionate, and poetic, with an ear for injustice if too willing to pass along apocrypha, and quite funny, and sometimes just plain wrong. Yet, when I think of coming generations, numbed by soundbites and political correctness, I would like to make it mandatory that every child should read Galeano. Because we should teach irony and sarcasm, and the cracks and shadows of history. This book is made up of 366 (days of) anecdotes of history, dated with purpose, celebrating the banished and tortured, women who were denied, languages lost. It's all meant to stoke your feelings: sadness and whimsy, conscience and thought. Anger too. Sometimes at a political leader; but occasionally at Galeano. I don't like that he hates the United States so much, and that he would minimize what happened on 9/11. This is my second Galeano. Everyone should read at least one of his books, if only one. You might find something to steal for your epitaph, like what Sophie Scholl said before being guillotined for passing out anti-war leaflets against Hitler. "Too bad," Sophie said. "Such a fine sunny day and I have to go." So as not to make this review too long, I will post excerpts in the comments. ________________________________________________ *Angry, I'm told, but I don't see it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris_P

    No catechism here. Only plain wisdom through knowledge, a chunk each day. Since no words can do it justice, here's a small taste: December 10 BLESSED WAR In the year 2009, on the anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, President Barack Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize. In his acceptance speech, the president thought it wise to pay homage to war: “times when nations will find the use of force not only necessary but morally justified.” Four and a half centuries b No catechism here. Only plain wisdom through knowledge, a chunk each day. Since no words can do it justice, here's a small taste: December 10 BLESSED WAR In the year 2009, on the anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, President Barack Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize. In his acceptance speech, the president thought it wise to pay homage to war: “times when nations will find the use of force not only necessary but morally justified.” Four and a half centuries before, when the Nobel Prize did not exist and evil resided in countries not with oil but with gold and silver, Spanish jurist Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda also defended war as “not only necessary but morally justified.” Ginés explained that war was necessary against the Indians of the Americas, “being by nature servile men who are barbarian, uncultured and inhuman,” and that war was justified, “because it is just, by natural right, that the body obey the soul, that the appetite obey reason, that brutes obey man, women their husbands, the imperfect the perfect and the worse the better, for the good of all.”

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kusaimamekirai

    I promised myself before starting this that I would go slowly and savor these daily looks into the forgotten men, women, and moments of history. That of course didn't happen. I devoured this at an incredible speed and yet I still was blown away by so many of these stories. While I was moved by some of the more familiar stories such as the passage on Martin Luther King: On this day in 1963, before an immense crowd carpeting the vast open mall of Washington, the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. dr I promised myself before starting this that I would go slowly and savor these daily looks into the forgotten men, women, and moments of history. That of course didn't happen. I devoured this at an incredible speed and yet I still was blown away by so many of these stories. While I was moved by some of the more familiar stories such as the passage on Martin Luther King: On this day in 1963, before an immense crowd carpeting the vast open mall of Washington, the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. dreamed out loud: “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. . . I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low . . . ” At the time the FBI had declared King “the most dangerous Negro of the future in this nation,” and numerous spies followed his every step, day and night. But he continued denouncing racial humiliation and the Vietnam War, which turned black men into cannon fodder, and without any hesitation he said that his country was “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world.” In 1968 a bullet split his skull. or Frida Kahlo: In 1954 a Communist demonstration marched through the streets of Mexico City. Frida Kahlo was there in her wheelchair. It was the last time she was seen alive. She died shortly thereafter, without fanfare. A number of years passed before the huge uproar of Fridamania awakened her. A just restitution or just business? Did this woman, who hated the pursuit of success and prettiness, deserve this? Did the artist of pitiless self-portraits, complete with unibrow and moustache, and bristling with pins and needles and the scars of thirty-two operations, deserve such treatment? What if all this were much more than a profit-making manipulation? What if it really were time’s homage to a woman who turned her agony into art? I was taken aback by some of the stories of men and women unknown to me such as this beautiful poem by the Sengalese poet Leopold Senghor: Beloved white brother: When I was born, I was black. When I grew up, I was black. When I am in the sun, I am black. When I fall ill, I am black. When I die, I will be black. And meanwhile you: When you were born, you were pink. When you grew up, you were white. When you’re in the sun, you turn red. When you feel cold, you turn blue. When you feel fear, you turn green. When you fall ill, you turn yellow. When you die, you will be gray. So, which of us is the colored man? or the story of the Guatemalan Myrna Mack: In the year 2004, for once the government of Guatemala broke with the tradition of impunity and officially acknowledged that Myrna Mack was killed by order of the country’s president. Myrna had undertaken forbidden research. Despite receiving threats, she had gone deep into the jungles and mountains to find exiles wandering in their own country, the indigenous survivors of the military’s massacres. She collected their voices. In 1989, at a conference of social scientists, an anthropologist from the United States complained about the pressure universities exert to continually produce: “In my country if you don’t publish, you perish.” And Myrna replied: “In my country if you publish, you perish.” She published. She was stabbed to death. Honestly, I could copy 98% of the stories that deeply affected me into this review but instead I'll simply say you need to read this book and about these people whom the powerful have tried to erase from history. Perhaps many have them have indeed disappeared from our consciousness but Galeano does the world a service in resurrecting them in this book and reminding us that the powerful do not always have the last say.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    I heard this brilliant author speak at City Lights last night, and am so looking forward to reading this book (I got a copy in English, which Goodreads does not seem to be aware of yet...). Finished this book and felt like I read a brief history of the world in poetry. Stories about everyone from Sor Juana de la Cruz to Mandela to Simon Bolivar's lover -- some achingly sad, some epic, some just quirky. Did you know that Zapata, Sandino and Che were all assassinated on October 8 (decades apart)? O I heard this brilliant author speak at City Lights last night, and am so looking forward to reading this book (I got a copy in English, which Goodreads does not seem to be aware of yet...). Finished this book and felt like I read a brief history of the world in poetry. Stories about everyone from Sor Juana de la Cruz to Mandela to Simon Bolivar's lover -- some achingly sad, some epic, some just quirky. Did you know that Zapata, Sandino and Che were all assassinated on October 8 (decades apart)? Or that the Soviet soccer team refused to play in Chile's National Stadium in 1973, so the Chilean team played against no opponent (and won)? Or that the first woman to write, Enheduanna, lived in Iraq 4,300 years ago? She wrote that writing "is like giving birth, creating life, conceeiving the world." She was exiled. So many stories and, once again, Galeano, tells them so well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    I can't think of a historian who has had a greater impact on my thinking and understanding of the world than Eduardo Galeano. His books are genuine treasures, and "Children of the Days" is a welcome addition to the trove. If you truly want to know the world beyond the public story, if you want to understand things, people and events buried by the injustices of time and the patina of forgetting, then read Eduardo Galeano. He brings a strand of lyricism and magic to everything he writes, and I nev I can't think of a historian who has had a greater impact on my thinking and understanding of the world than Eduardo Galeano. His books are genuine treasures, and "Children of the Days" is a welcome addition to the trove. If you truly want to know the world beyond the public story, if you want to understand things, people and events buried by the injustices of time and the patina of forgetting, then read Eduardo Galeano. He brings a strand of lyricism and magic to everything he writes, and I never walk away from one of his books without growing in a tangible, and permanent, way.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Kennedy

    Each day (and night), I look forward to learning something poetic, hopeful, darkest hours and sweet victories of human experiences throughout history. Here are two from the month of March and one from my birthday as examples. MARCH 14 - In 1883 a crowd gathered for Karl Marx's funeral in a London cemetery---a crowd of eleven, counting the undertaker. "The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point, however, is to change it." Regarding his masterwork, he said: "No one Each day (and night), I look forward to learning something poetic, hopeful, darkest hours and sweet victories of human experiences throughout history. Here are two from the month of March and one from my birthday as examples. MARCH 14 - In 1883 a crowd gathered for Karl Marx's funeral in a London cemetery---a crowd of eleven, counting the undertaker. "The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point, however, is to change it." Regarding his masterwork, he said: "No one ever wrote so much about money while having so little. "Capital" will not even pay for the cigars I smoked writing it." MARCH 15 - At dawn today in the year 44 BC, Calpurnia woke up in tears. She had dreamed her husband had been stabbed and was dying in her arms. Calpurnia told him the dream, and still sobbing pleaded with him to remain at home, for outside only his grave awaited. The supreme ruler, dictator for life, divine warrior, undefeated god, could not pay heed to a woman's dream. Julius Caesar pushed her aside and walked toward the Roman Senate, to his death. AUGUST 31 - In 1943 during World War II, General George Patton harangued his soldiers: "You are here because you are real men and all real men like to fight! Americans love a winner! They will not tolerate a loser! Americans despise cowards! Americans play to win all of the time! That's why Americans have never lost nor will ever lose a war! He must have been reincarnated. Before entering the US Army, he had been a warrior in Carthage and Athens, a gentleman at the court of England and a field marshal for Napoleon Bonaparte. General Patton died at the end of 1945, run over by a truck.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    This is an outstanding book. The author presents a brief anecdote for each day of the year and manages to visit each continent and encompasses the entirety of “human history.” A word of caution, however, this is not the book to read if you’re looking for daily affirmation or optimism. There is nothing “chicken-soup-for-the-soul-ish” about this book. While there are plenty of inspiring moments, the author discusses human history with all its ugliness and honesty. He has no patience for injustice This is an outstanding book. The author presents a brief anecdote for each day of the year and manages to visit each continent and encompasses the entirety of “human history.” A word of caution, however, this is not the book to read if you’re looking for daily affirmation or optimism. There is nothing “chicken-soup-for-the-soul-ish” about this book. While there are plenty of inspiring moments, the author discusses human history with all its ugliness and honesty. He has no patience for injustice (from anyone). I am so glad to have read this book, most especially because I am woefully ignorant about much of Central and South American history. Now I have lots of names to look into and events to Google!

  9. 4 out of 5

    jeremy

    the great eduardo galeano, uruguayan writer and journalist, has spent some five decades in literary pursuit of restoring memory, veracity, and justice to their once-exalted heights. resounding throughout his works are the amplified echoes of the forgotten, forsaken, silenced, and slandered. in giving voice to the voiceless, galeano ensures that history's authorship shall not be entrusted solely to the wealthy, powerful, and victorious. children of the days (los hijos de los días) is composed of 3 the great eduardo galeano, uruguayan writer and journalist, has spent some five decades in literary pursuit of restoring memory, veracity, and justice to their once-exalted heights. resounding throughout his works are the amplified echoes of the forgotten, forsaken, silenced, and slandered. in giving voice to the voiceless, galeano ensures that history's authorship shall not be entrusted solely to the wealthy, powerful, and victorious. children of the days (los hijos de los días) is composed of 366 of galeano's trademark vignettes - one for every gregorian calendar day of the year. each of these entries, marked by both brevity and beauty, recounts or remembers an individual, moment, or era omitted from the official annals of yesteryear. in retrieving these stories from their historical exile, galeano redeems their dignity and reanimates their tale. more than the mere act of commemoration alone, these vignettes illume the dark and disregarded corners of our collective past (and act, perhaps, as bulwark against repeating its myriad misdeeds). december 17 the little flame on this morning in 2010, as on every other morning, mohamed bouazizi was hauling his cart filled with fruit and vegetables somewhere in tunis. as on every other morning, the police arrived to collect the levy they had concocted. but this morning, mohamed refused to pay. the policemen beat him, overturned his cart and stomped all over his fruit and vegetables splattered on the ground. mohamed then doused himself from head to foot with gasoline and set himself on fire. in a few days, that little flame, no taller than a street vendor, grew to encompass the entire arab world, ablaze with people tired of being nobody.children of the days, like nearly all of galeano's books, excoriates the excesses of war, religion, capitalism, and conquest. in reframing the historical narrative to be more inclusive and forthright, galeano takes equal inspiration from politics, poetry, and the proletariat. whether by revolution or revelation, many of the figures he chose to memorialize could be defined by their defiance, outspokenness, and dissatisfaction of the status quo. galeano's longing for an equitable, verdant, and peaceable world has informed his writing since he began his career, and his commitment to engendering such a vision is one of the essential characteristics of his work. june 5 nature is not mute reality paints still-lifes. disasters are called natural, as if nature were the executioner and not the victim. meanwhile the climate goes haywire and we do too. today is world environment day. a good day to celebrate the new constitution of ecuador, which in the year 2008, for the first time in the history of the world, recognized nature as a subject with rights. it seems strange, this notion that nature has rights as if it were a person. but in the united states it seems perfectly normal that big companies have human rights. they do, ever since a supreme court decision in 1886. if nature were a bank, they would have already rescued it.eduardo galeano composes prose as resplendent as some of his subjects are sorrowful. with ever the eye for the neglected, distressed, oppressed, and maligned (spanning thousands of years), he creates beauty where once there was betrayal, and intrigue where ignorance once thrived. from the familiar to the obscure, galeano masterfully recollects and rescues from amnesiac disregard those for whom history has never made room. children of the days is but the latest steadfast entry in galeano's efforts to resist the erosive effects of time, revisionism, and selective memory. obsessed with remembering lest the rest of us forget (and perhaps to help restore the enduring promise of the future), galeano makes an offering of his art so that we may yet be reminded of the inherent brilliance, dignity, and wonder of a life consumed not by belligerence, fanaticism, and the shallow pursuit of wealth but one that is instead receptive to the voices of others and the world at large. may 15 may tomorrow be more than just another name for today in 2011 thousands of homeless and jobless youth occupied the streets and squares of several spanish cities. their outrage spread. healthy outrage turned out to be more contagious than disease, and the voices of "the indignant" crossed the borders drawn on maps. their words echoed around the world: they put us in the fucking street and here we are. turn off the tv and turn on the street. they call it a crisis but it's a rip-off. not too little money, too many crooks. markets rule. i didn't vote for them. they decide for us without us. wage slave for rent. i'm looking for my rights. anyone seen them? if they won't let us dream, we won't let them sleep. *rendered from the spanish by mark fried, galeano's longtime english translator.

  10. 5 out of 5

    M. Ashraf

    This is a great!!! book, it's not a traditional one either, it's just a memory... what a day remembers, from all over the world, mostly, it was South America but still it was great :p While nearing the end of it, I realized we - as country/people, Egypt 25/Jan - wont be mentioned in history books maybe as footnote of failing uprisings :( and again when I turn back to the past few years how everything went down the drain just like that, how we were hopeful for the future... but again with decades This is a great!!! book, it's not a traditional one either, it's just a memory... what a day remembers, from all over the world, mostly, it was South America but still it was great :p While nearing the end of it, I realized we - as country/people, Egypt 25/Jan - wont be mentioned in history books maybe as footnote of failing uprisings :( and again when I turn back to the past few years how everything went down the drain just like that, how we were hopeful for the future... but again with decades of dictatorship and torture I read about in this book in Brazil/Argentina/Chile/Uruguay/Bolivia... maybe one day..! كتاب الاسبوع! الترجمة العربي اللي لقيتها متاحة كانت أبناء الأيام لصالح علماني و بعد أول كام يوم و بعد كلمة "الحس السليم" :) مش عارف دايقتني ليه و لكني اتقفلت الصراحة Thomas Pain - Common Sense و بالتالي كان القرار بقراءتها بالانجليزية :) ما علينا... الكتاب حلو بأي لغة :) بالنسبة للبرنامج، فهو من ساعة ما بدأ و هو رايح نحية من نوع الكتب دا على أمل انه يعمل حاجة -_- مش عارف مع مين بس اهو ... الكتب اللي بتتقال حلوة لغاية اللحظة كتاب الاسبوع اللي فات كان A People's History of the United States - Zinn_ Howard و دا مينفعش في اسبوع -_- أي نعم قريت اللي اكبر منه في اقل من اسبوع بس دا اسبوع امتحانات :) :) :) بس موجود بردوا English .epub يمكن في المستقبل :) Reality is not what it is; it’s what I tell you it is Plato never wrote his most famous line: “Only the dead have seen the end of war.” Don Quijote de la Mancha never said: “Let the dogs bark, Sancho. It’s a sign we are on track.” Voltaire’s best-known line was not said or written by him: “I do not agree with what you have to say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel never wrote: “All theory is gray, my friend, but green is the tree of life.” Sherlock Holmes never said: “Elementary, my dear Watson.” In none of his books or pamphlets did Lenin write: “The ends justify the means.” Bertolt Brecht was not the author of his most oft-cited poem: “First they came for the Communists / and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a Communist . . . “ And neither was Jorge Luis Borges the author of his best-known poem: “If I could live my life over / I would try to make more mistakes . . . ” “Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.” Abracadabra Give your fire until the last of your days.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I want so much to write a good review of this book — not just good, but elegant, evocative… something that would really do it justice. But, honestly, I don’t know if i have adequate words to describe the way Galeano writes, the way that he creates something that is poetry and prose and history and politics and rhetoric and reflection and light and dark all at the same time. It’s beautiful, and I fell in love from the first page of the first book of his I ever opened.  Especially because all this I want so much to write a good review of this book — not just good, but elegant, evocative… something that would really do it justice. But, honestly, I don’t know if i have adequate words to describe the way Galeano writes, the way that he creates something that is poetry and prose and history and politics and rhetoric and reflection and light and dark all at the same time. It’s beautiful, and I fell in love from the first page of the first book of his I ever opened.  Especially because all this beauty is in service of a purpose. Galeano uses his writing to challenge the world — by making the familiar strange, to challenge the reader to question dominant narratives, dominant paradigms, dominant histories that erase perspectives, events, and even entire peoples from common knowledge. Much of his work is about injustice, economic inequality, colonialism, and their legacies, but because he writes in such a lyrical way, it not only encourages political engagement but also creates an powerful emotional engagement in the reader. Children of the Days is styled as a calendar, with one anecdote per day relating a event that occurred on that day, or linking to the birth, death, or significant anniversary of a person. What unites all the entries is their focus on telling the stories that usually go untold, with subjects outside the mainstream. They bring to light forgotten or nearly-forgotten incidents and people, raise the voices of the world’s marginalized or downtrodden, and honor the spirit and achievements of dissidents, rebels, nonconformists, and outsiders. My only regret is that so far, I’ve only read Galeano in English, but soon I’ll have to find some of his books in Spanish, to really hear him in his own voice. It’s a tribute to to the translator that this reads as wonderfully as it does. Children of the Days is intensely moving and illuminating, and I’d especially recommend it as required reading for anyone born and raised in a world-power country. For my first read, I read it through cover to cover; for the next, it’ll be by my bedside, a daily devotional of undervalued history. There will also be a copy on the nightstand of every guest bedroom in ever home I’ll ever inhabit — i’m on my way to becoming an evangelist of Galeano's work, to which this is an excellent introduction. If I could, I’d replace every Gideon bible in every hotel nightstand with this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kirti Upreti

    [Re-read: Nov 2020] I admit: I revere Galeano so much that I find everyone else in the world absolutely undeserving of my admiration, affection, attention and, most importantly, time. In a world where every face dons multiple masks and every heart conceals multifarious lies - some reserved for the world and the rest to console itself- it is only a miracle for someone like Eduardo Galeano to have been here, who could not only tell the truth but knew how to navigate through the ether that connects [Re-read: Nov 2020] I admit: I revere Galeano so much that I find everyone else in the world absolutely undeserving of my admiration, affection, attention and, most importantly, time. In a world where every face dons multiple masks and every heart conceals multifarious lies - some reserved for the world and the rest to console itself- it is only a miracle for someone like Eduardo Galeano to have been here, who could not only tell the truth but knew how to navigate through the ether that connects all lives in this world. The system, in its ever superficial and bland ways of assigning a pigeonhole to everything and everyone, calls him a leftist. I call it pettiness of thought. If you really know him, you'd also know that he can't be attached to any monolithic faction. He belongs to no one and hence, to everyone. He effortlessly sails through the barriers of time and geography. He belongs nowhere and hence, everywhere. Does he tell history? Sure! But not what you've learnt from the banalities called textbooks and museums. He speaks in the language of memories. Is he a storyteller? He certainly is but he likes to hold your hand and take you along to realms and dimensions that you didn't know ever existed. Is it possible that you might fall in love with him? If you don't then you'd be squandering the priceless ability to read. What's more, it would be a sheer waste of the ability to love and empathize. Then, what's even life for? -------------------------------------------------- [First read: July 2020] It's my fourth Eduardo Galeano book in the last two months. I just can't seem to get enough of his words. Reading his words feels like listening to bedtime stories, one after another with each story taking me to another universe. Each story causes a scintillating effect on my senses that leaves me yearning for more. The more I read him, the more I wish he were sitting beside me telling me all these stories of our past in his own voice. There is so much that I have to tell him; tell him how much I revere his way of seeing, how awestruck I am of his wisdom that's able to find hope in despair and melancholy in saturnalia, how the simplicity of his words makes me his aficionado and acolyte, how I long for him to be with me to answer my limitless curiosities aroused by his thoughts. I wish he could somehow know how I wish I could be an iota of what he was.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo Santiago

    We are monsters, we humans, we're also sublime. I don't know how else to describe the feelings evoked here by Galeano nor how to recommend this book. You know those cutesy “On This Day” calendar sidebars, with fascinating facts about what white European males did on this long ago day? As it turns out, the past was also inhabited by women and darker-skinned people (of both sexes), and some of those shaped our world too. There are even some of those around today. Who knew? This is a book of vignett We are monsters, we humans, we're also sublime. I don't know how else to describe the feelings evoked here by Galeano nor how to recommend this book. You know those cutesy “On This Day” calendar sidebars, with fascinating facts about what white European males did on this long ago day? As it turns out, the past was also inhabited by women and darker-skinned people (of both sexes), and some of those shaped our world too. There are even some of those around today. Who knew? This is a book of vignettes. Short ones, one per calendar day, mostly short and sweet. Sweet indeed: Galeano's voice, how to describe it? Gentle, kind, deeply ironic but without bitterness. Strongly reminiscent of Balys Sruoga in Forest of the Gods; reading these two so closely together feels eerily appropriate to today's world. “Those donations,” Galeano writes, referring to the pollutants tossed into a Mexican river by megacorporations. Writing of an 8-year-old boy who fell into the river: “He did not die by drowning. He died by poisoning.” “Donations” indeed: “gifts” would've come off cynical, and no descriptive word like toxin or poison would have a similar impact. “Donations” is striking because of its inoffensiveness. And he keeps it up, 365 days of perfectly crafted sentences with perfectly impacting words. He writes of monstrous acts and also honorable ones—they are so often intertwined. He points out hypocrisies, noble heroic acts, simple decent ones. I could not read this in one sitting. I constantly went on Wikipedia tangents—safaris—exploring, learning more about the undeservedly obscure characters he so briefly introduces. Or sometimes I just closed the book and pondered. Or went back and reread. I read the Kindle edition, because I have no way right now of getting the Spanish hardcopy... but I'm going to look for it, and maybe English too, and, like Linda, hope to leave copies by my bedside and the guest bedroom. To flip open at random, skim, and wonder.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angelina

    This collection of vignettes (one for each day of the year) is a stunning kaleidoscope of stories that bring to the limelight (forgotten) heroes and villains as well as special days and events from ancient times to the recent past. It blends poetry and history, myth and fact, irony and compassion, beauty and brutality and teaches lessons in humanity. It poses questions and pushes you to poke further for more information. The stories are peculiar, grim and entertaining at the same time and Galean This collection of vignettes (one for each day of the year) is a stunning kaleidoscope of stories that bring to the limelight (forgotten) heroes and villains as well as special days and events from ancient times to the recent past. It blends poetry and history, myth and fact, irony and compassion, beauty and brutality and teaches lessons in humanity. It poses questions and pushes you to poke further for more information. The stories are peculiar, grim and entertaining at the same time and Galeano effortlessly travels in space and time while weaving them and I was more than happy to come along for the ride.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Salem

    I enjoy Galeano's humanist tone. His left leaning position, commitment and absolute resolution, that elevates the human endeavor on this lonely planet to its highest levels and equally shows the abyss of savagery that man can sink to. Poetic, yet brutally honest, using actual historical moments reminding us of the many failures and viciousness mankind has committed over the years, as well as the grand accomplishments and epic adventures mankind have achieved. أنا أستمتع بنبرة غاليانو الإنسانية. م I enjoy Galeano's humanist tone. His left leaning position, commitment and absolute resolution, that elevates the human endeavor on this lonely planet to its highest levels and equally shows the abyss of savagery that man can sink to. Poetic, yet brutally honest, using actual historical moments reminding us of the many failures and viciousness mankind has committed over the years, as well as the grand accomplishments and epic adventures mankind have achieved. أنا أستمتع بنبرة غاليانو الإنسانية. موقفه اليساري ، و الالتزام و التصميم المطلق ، فهو يرفع المسعى الإنساني على هذا الكوكب الوحيد إلى أعلى مستوياته ، و يظهر بالتساوي الهاوية التي يمكن للإنسان أن يغرق بها. لغة الكتاب شاعرية ، و لكنها صادقة بوحشية ، يستخدم لحظات تاريخية فعلية تذكرنا بالعديد من الإخفاقات و الشرسة التي ارتكبتها البشرية على مر السنين ، و كذلك الإنجازات الكبرى والمغامرات الملحمية التي حققتها البشرية.

  16. 4 out of 5

    øzge mø

    Colored Man Beloved white brother: When I was born, I was black. When I grew up, I was black. When I am in the sun, I am black. When I fall ill, I am black. When I die, I will be black. And meanwhile you: When you were born, you were pink. When you grew up, you were white. When you’re in the sun, you turn red. When you feel cold, you turn blue. When you feel fear, you turn green. When you fall ill, you turn yellow. When you die, you will be gray. So, which of us is the colored man? Leopold Senghor s.271

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ynna

    I read the English translation and thought it was some of the most beautiful prose I've ever read. Eduardo Galeano recalls historical events, stories, legends and poems for each day of the year. Though most of Galeano's daily passages were simply "this-day-in-history," even his simple facts were written poetically and often ended hauntingly. Several times I audibly whispered "wow" after reading a day. I read the English translation and thought it was some of the most beautiful prose I've ever read. Eduardo Galeano recalls historical events, stories, legends and poems for each day of the year. Though most of Galeano's daily passages were simply "this-day-in-history," even his simple facts were written poetically and often ended hauntingly. Several times I audibly whispered "wow" after reading a day.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fathy Sroor

    to be reviewed later

  19. 5 out of 5

    Conor Ahern

    My original intention, in 2018, was to read one page of this book every day of the year. I fell behind and never caught up. I failed again in 2019, but reaffirmed my intentions in 2020. The year brought more unexpected misery than good, but one of the latter things was it allowed me to have most of my idle moments (most moments, unremarkably) in my bedroom. It sat on my desk for months, and I rarely went more than a week or two without picking it up and getting back on track. The concept is that My original intention, in 2018, was to read one page of this book every day of the year. I fell behind and never caught up. I failed again in 2019, but reaffirmed my intentions in 2020. The year brought more unexpected misery than good, but one of the latter things was it allowed me to have most of my idle moments (most moments, unremarkably) in my bedroom. It sat on my desk for months, and I rarely went more than a week or two without picking it up and getting back on track. The concept is that the author tells a story, sometimes a folktale but often a historical fact, often little known in the English-speaking world, for every day of the calendar year. When these are based on actual calendar dates (e.g., September 11, May 5), they correspond to that date in the book; when they are based on seasons (e.g., Easter, Ramadan), they are only approximate. As a Uruguayan writer, Galeano writes disproportionately about the Latin American experience. He seems to aim to provoke, flipping the script on those who view the West and the imperial powers of North America and Europe as unblemished heroes. I enjoyed it thoroughly, and learned a lot.

  20. 5 out of 5

    refgoddess

    For years I had a copy of Galeano's poetry sitting on my bedside table. (Then I returned it to its owner.) Now this fabulous collection of poetic short historical essays has crossed my desk, and I'm already making plans to renew it incessantly for the next year. Someone needs to make a desk calendar out of it so I can return it to the library. Here's the entry for my birthday: Today in the Year 2006, Pope Benedict, the supreme pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church, took a walk in the gardens of th For years I had a copy of Galeano's poetry sitting on my bedside table. (Then I returned it to its owner.) Now this fabulous collection of poetic short historical essays has crossed my desk, and I'm already making plans to renew it incessantly for the next year. Someone needs to make a desk calendar out of it so I can return it to the library. Here's the entry for my birthday: Today in the Year 2006, Pope Benedict, the supreme pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church, took a walk in the gardens of the city called, in Polish, Oswiecim. At a certain point the scenery changed. In German the city of Oswiecim is called Auschwitz. And in Auschwitz, the pope spoke. From the most famous death factory in the world, he asked, "And God, where was He?" No one told him that God had never changed his address. He asked, "Why did God remain silent?" No one pointed out that it was the Church that remained silent, the Church that spoke in God's name.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

    A year’s worth of revolutionary history. Smoothly polished gems that memorialize the workers, martyrs, women, peasants, artists whose names are largely erased from history textbooks, plus savage critiques of the bosses, kings, bankers, generals, presidents whose names we know too well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christa Yoshimoto

    History, politics, poetry, mythology and so much more all combined into this incredible piece of literature. One to treasure on the bookshelf.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    He did it again. I *never* get tired of Galeano.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    LOVED IT - finished it in a few hours on the plane home - will re-read this week.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jake Cotto

    One of those works that leaves you wondering, "Damn, how did he do this?" I need to find a way to incorporate this text into my teaching. One of those works that leaves you wondering, "Damn, how did he do this?" I need to find a way to incorporate this text into my teaching.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Prithu

    Interesting read. The scintillating entries are insightful, unique and somehow erratic. Could have enjoyed more had it followed a specific pattern.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Al Bità

    Historians, as we all know, choose people and events they are describing in order to highlight the specific intent of their exposition. If this interpretation is taken up by future generations, that intent becomes “fact”. This results in others, wishing to represent a different intent, to accuse received historic “facts” as biassed, and as not representing the “truth” of the situation. Revisionist historians attempt to provide equally compelling rationalisations of history by delving into texts Historians, as we all know, choose people and events they are describing in order to highlight the specific intent of their exposition. If this interpretation is taken up by future generations, that intent becomes “fact”. This results in others, wishing to represent a different intent, to accuse received historic “facts” as biassed, and as not representing the “truth” of the situation. Revisionist historians attempt to provide equally compelling rationalisations of history by delving into texts relating to other people and other events and coming up with alternative narratives for the same events. This can be done on a number of different levels. If one combines these together, one can come up with a composite synthesis which enriches the narrative with its multiple levels, while at the same time undermines any particular ideology derived from a single narrative. The latter, of course, is an important ideological stance all by itself. From another perspective, the “enriched” narratives give “permission” for the creation of historical novels, wherein real or fictional persons are combined with real or fictional events to create another type of world altogether. If well researched and well written, these fictions can ironically give the reader a more vivid sense of the people and events involved and perhaps even a better sense of the “real” history of those times. Despite all this, real persons, and real events exist which do not always register in one’s perception of history, mainly because the latter is linked to one’s own cultural background, and most histories tend to minimise or exclude what is deemed not relevant either to a particular time or place, or to the particular idea being explored. What Galeano has done with this book is to resurrect, in the gentlest of ways, those people and those stories which in general have possibly escaped our notice (for whatever reasons) and re-presented them to us for our enjoyment and our edification (and maybe even for our education). He employs the device of using the days of the year to provide an historical event that occurred on that day in no more than barely a page of text per day. Thus we are presented with 366 (there is an entry even for February 29) simple facts of history that in most cases would have slipped our awareness. None of the entries are in-depth analyses of these events, but whenever he feels the urge Galeano will add a sly, humorous or sad comment in the mix. Obviously, this is not a book for scholars or academics except insofar as their humanity takes precedence over the requirements of their disciplines. There is no bibliography. It is more intended for ordinary human beings interested on other human beings, the poor, the forgotten, those who have slipped through the cracks of received historical narratives, etc. The result is charming, informative, funny and sad, but always interesting.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    This is an almanac, or day-by-day calendar. The author writes of one historical occurrence on each particular day, through a whole year. In length, the entries range from three lines to a page. Many of the events are unusual. Many end with a trenchant and incisive observation of the author's. Many are of historical events that happened in Central or South America. I can understand that--after all, the author is Uruguayan. Some of the author's conclusions made me feel uncomfortable but some obser This is an almanac, or day-by-day calendar. The author writes of one historical occurrence on each particular day, through a whole year. In length, the entries range from three lines to a page. Many of the events are unusual. Many end with a trenchant and incisive observation of the author's. Many are of historical events that happened in Central or South America. I can understand that--after all, the author is Uruguayan. Some of the author's conclusions made me feel uncomfortable but some observations made me stop and think. This calendar is always fascinating. I know I learned a lot. I couldn't stop at just one entry. I was led to want to know a little more about some of these people and events, unknown to me heretofore. Some of my favorite entries--and these will give you an idea of how wide he throws his net of information: Jan. 3-"Memory on legs": To keep books safe from war and carnage, the grand vizier of Persia, Abdul Kassem Ismael, kept his library of 117,000 books on 400 camels, always with him. The first "bookmobile"?? Feb. 28-"When": Linus Pauling. Mar. 19-"Birth of the movies": The Lumière Brothers in 1895. Apr. 7- "The Doctor's bill": Hammurabi's laws on how much to pay doctors. June 22-"The world's waist": Erastosthenes and his discovery that the world is round. 234 BC. Aug. 24-"Pompeii": Eruption of Vesuvius and Pliny the Elder. 79 AD. Sept. 18-"First [Native American] female doctor": an Omaha Indian woman, Susan LaFlesch Picotte. In 1915, this is her death date. Sept. 19-"First female admiral": Artemisia of Caria at the Battle of Salamis. 480 BC. Oct. 30-"The Martians are coming": Orson Welles and his infamous radio broadcast, with subsequent bète noirs. Nov. 14-"Mother of female journalists": Nelly Bly. Dec. 4-"Green memories": Trees leave 'writings' for us, if we can but read them. Dec. 21-" Joy of saying": Enheduanna, in ancient Sumer, the first woman writer. This is a book to dip into, again and again, not to read straight through. Mesmerising, although you may not agree with the author's opinions every time. Thought-provoking. Recommended!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Venky

    A calendar of neglect, but paradoxically a calendar of immense import. Relegated to the confines of the dustbin of history to be too obscure or derided by a fickle memory as too obtuse, these are the forgotten children of Planet earth whose influence, either triumphant or terrible will be felt until perpetuity. Eduardo Galeano in a marvelously minimalist style, lays down one event (in some rare cases multiple) for every day of the year. Triumph juxtaposes with tragedy; horrors vie with heroics a A calendar of neglect, but paradoxically a calendar of immense import. Relegated to the confines of the dustbin of history to be too obscure or derided by a fickle memory as too obtuse, these are the forgotten children of Planet earth whose influence, either triumphant or terrible will be felt until perpetuity. Eduardo Galeano in a marvelously minimalist style, lays down one event (in some rare cases multiple) for every day of the year. Triumph juxtaposes with tragedy; horrors vie with heroics and humour blends in with hatred as Galeano unfurls each splendid tale of his in an uninhibited fashion. The past coalesces with the present only to coagulate into the future. Employing a marvelously minimalist style, Galeano sets out what can justifiably be termed the 'human anthology'. The topics are as diverse as the foibles and favours concerning them. They envelope time and space with carefree abandon. John Rockefeller's autopsy competes with a pair of German brother's whose diligence in learning the ways of life of the Mayans in Trojolabal did the world an immeasurable service. The unfortunate cooking of a bishop named Pedro Fernandes Sardinha (no pun intended) shares space with the second birth of Fyodor Dostoevsky, who got a miraculous reprieve from a firing squad. Spanish inquisitions and the Russian football team that failed to turn up to play Chile in Pinochet's ill maintained National Stadium (an original torture chamber for prisoners) merge to harrow and hurt the human conscience. Galeano also lends an element of scathing satire and sardonic views for some implacable events such as the unjustified invasion of Iraq by the US on the pretext of destroying 'non-existent' Weapons of Mass Destruction. The precocious value of this book can be aptly summarised by reproducing John Berger who reviewed it, "put it beside your bed and the bed of those you love" Children Of The Days - Not just to be kept beside the physical bed but to be firmly etched in the bed of conscience!

  30. 5 out of 5

    thecatchmeifyoucan

    This book is fantastic. It is a brutally honest and clever retelling of history that had me chuckling and cringing at how awful humanity can be.

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