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Solaris Rising 2: The New Solaris Book of Science Fiction

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Following the exceptionally well received first collection, Solaris Rising 2 brings even more best-selling and cutting edge SF authors together for another extraodrinary volume of ground-breaking stories.Having re-affirmed Solaris’s proud reputation for producing high quality science fiction antologies in the first volume, Solaris Rising 2 is the next collection in this ex Following the exceptionally well received first collection, Solaris Rising 2 brings even more best-selling and cutting edge SF authors together for another extraodrinary volume of ground-breaking stories.Having re-affirmed Solaris’s proud reputation for producing high quality science fiction antologies in the first volume, Solaris Rising 2 is the next collection in this exciting series. Featuring stories by Allan Steele, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Kim Lakin-Smith, Paul Cornell, Eugie Foster, Nick Harkaway, Nancy Kress, Kay Kenyon, James Lovegrove, Robert Reed, Mercurio D. Rivera, Norman Spinrad, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Liz Williams, Vandana Singh, Martin Sketchley, and more. These stories are guaranteed to surprise, thrill and delight, and maintain our mission to demonstrate why science fiction remains the most exiting, varied and inspiring of all fiction genres. In Solaris Rising we showed both the quality and variety that modern science fiction can produce. In Solaris Rising 2, we'll be taking that much, much further. Contents: Extensions: an introduction / Ian Whates -- Tom / Paul Cornell -- More / Nancy Kress -- Shall inherit / James Lovegrove -- Feast and famine / Adrian Tchaikovsky -- Whatever skin you wear / Eugie Foster -- Pearl in the shell / Neil Williamson -- The time gun / Nick Harkaway -- When Thomas Jefferson dined alone / Kristine Kathryn Rausch -- Bonds / Robert Reed -- Ticking / Allen Steele -- Before hope / Kim Lakin-Smith -- The spires of Greme / Kay Kenyon -- Manmade / Mercurio D. Rivera -- The circle of least confusion / Martin Sketchley -- Far distant suns / Norman Spinrad -- Lighthouse / Liz Williams -- The first dance / Martin McGrath -- Still life with skull / Mike Allen -- With fate conspire / Vandana Singh.


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Following the exceptionally well received first collection, Solaris Rising 2 brings even more best-selling and cutting edge SF authors together for another extraodrinary volume of ground-breaking stories.Having re-affirmed Solaris’s proud reputation for producing high quality science fiction antologies in the first volume, Solaris Rising 2 is the next collection in this ex Following the exceptionally well received first collection, Solaris Rising 2 brings even more best-selling and cutting edge SF authors together for another extraodrinary volume of ground-breaking stories.Having re-affirmed Solaris’s proud reputation for producing high quality science fiction antologies in the first volume, Solaris Rising 2 is the next collection in this exciting series. Featuring stories by Allan Steele, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Kim Lakin-Smith, Paul Cornell, Eugie Foster, Nick Harkaway, Nancy Kress, Kay Kenyon, James Lovegrove, Robert Reed, Mercurio D. Rivera, Norman Spinrad, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Liz Williams, Vandana Singh, Martin Sketchley, and more. These stories are guaranteed to surprise, thrill and delight, and maintain our mission to demonstrate why science fiction remains the most exiting, varied and inspiring of all fiction genres. In Solaris Rising we showed both the quality and variety that modern science fiction can produce. In Solaris Rising 2, we'll be taking that much, much further. Contents: Extensions: an introduction / Ian Whates -- Tom / Paul Cornell -- More / Nancy Kress -- Shall inherit / James Lovegrove -- Feast and famine / Adrian Tchaikovsky -- Whatever skin you wear / Eugie Foster -- Pearl in the shell / Neil Williamson -- The time gun / Nick Harkaway -- When Thomas Jefferson dined alone / Kristine Kathryn Rausch -- Bonds / Robert Reed -- Ticking / Allen Steele -- Before hope / Kim Lakin-Smith -- The spires of Greme / Kay Kenyon -- Manmade / Mercurio D. Rivera -- The circle of least confusion / Martin Sketchley -- Far distant suns / Norman Spinrad -- Lighthouse / Liz Williams -- The first dance / Martin McGrath -- Still life with skull / Mike Allen -- With fate conspire / Vandana Singh.

30 review for Solaris Rising 2: The New Solaris Book of Science Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Like it any anthology, it's hit and miss, but many of the ideas don't feel fully fleshed out, but the hits are delicious. The first story by Paul Cornell reminded me that he wrote comics and why I don't usual read his stuff (except Young Avengers: Dark Reign). It was the usual Earth bound humans and their first (sexual) encounter with another species. it's a bit boring because it's pretty predictable and hetero-normative. The sex is described in an interesting way, but there's not much new or int Like it any anthology, it's hit and miss, but many of the ideas don't feel fully fleshed out, but the hits are delicious. The first story by Paul Cornell reminded me that he wrote comics and why I don't usual read his stuff (except Young Avengers: Dark Reign). It was the usual Earth bound humans and their first (sexual) encounter with another species. it's a bit boring because it's pretty predictable and hetero-normative. The sex is described in an interesting way, but there's not much new or interesting in this story. Next up is Nancy Kress with her usual dissect of how technology can be used to divide the haves and have-nots. This time it's personal, which makes it feel a bit thin and the end too vague and personal. "Shall Inherit" is another cliche story about an ecological disaster leading to an Ark sent to space. The twist is that the Ark will be filled with autistic kids and it's from the perspective of the father of one of these kids. The best bit is the DJ/blogger/streamcast that serves as exposition. that was fun. The author handles voices of his characters very well. "Feast and Famine" is the first piece of hard sci-fi and I enjoyed it greatly. a space crew examines another downed craft and see if it contacted life. It's suspenseful and nicely plotted. I felt the protagonists anxiety. "Whatever Skin you Wear" was a sweet virtual reality type story involving a couple. It's actually one of the better stories on handling gender and identity. "Pearl in the Shell" takes a look at music and copyright in the future. It's not my sort of thing, but it plays well with some neat ideas. It felt like a fully realized world, but I just wasn't invested in the characters or the world like I was with the story that preceded it. "The Time Gun" is a fun time travel story. The end was a nice twist. It reminded me of Vonnegurt with the plot and the humor. Kristine Kathryn Rusch is one of my favorite authors and this story just reminded me. It time travel as viewed by an academic who cares more about her research that the possible effects of viewing the past would have on history itself. the quotes and the last scenes are just wonderful. I can't say more without feeling like I would take away from the humor or the relationships and how they affect the outcome. I might be blathering. "Bonds" might be the worst story in the book. It's more like a giant outline of book. There's only a few scenes. It's more about the idea of the story than actually events and how it affects people and their lives. It went beyond being predictable and was more like reading the author work out a rant with vague characters. "Ticking" was predictable, too, but the characters were fun. The voice of the characters weren't as clear, but it was your usual story of technology turning on humanity and a small band of survivors with a few that have useful skills. "Before Hope" was another story that threw you into a dystopian future in space amidst a workers rebelling against the upper class. It was a fully realized world that I wouldn't mind visiting in a full novel. Kay Kenyon does sort of the same thing in "The Spires of Greme" without the class conflict. It's a dystoopian America and the rebellion is barely that. By the time the story ended I wanted more of the last characters standing. The description of the land and events were evocative and beautiful. "Manmade" by Mercurio D. Rivera was beautiful for the exploration of humanity and what it means even at its worst. There were a lot of directions that story could have gone in and I was delightful surprised in how he structured this relatable world and the plot. Martin Sketchley's "Circle of Least Confusion" was one of the collection's hopeful stories. It takes a simple and familiar sci-fi idea of an alien artifact and how it affect as couple who finds it and makes a sweet little story. "Far Distant Suns" is a hard sci-fi story of witnessing a sun rise on an alien planet. A solid story despite barely having no characters and no dialogue. "The Lighthouse" feels like it was cobbled together from parts of other stories. It's complete but It left me cold. I'm not sure why. Mayeb because I found the ending cliche despite the story''s lovely language. Martin McGrath's "The Last Dance" is the other hopeful story. It has a tinge of dystopia, but it's focus is on relationships and it's a small beautiful story. "Still Life with a Skull" was an interesting concept and I love the images presenting in the story, but I'm not sure what happened. I loved the frequent use of gender neutral pronouns, like hir and se. Vandana Singh's "With Fate Conspire" was an interesting a beautiful story. I want to read more by her. I could go on and on about the themes and the language and the characters, but

  2. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Another instalment of new SF short stories demonstrating the breadth and depth that the genre has to offer in 2013. This contained some familiar authors but many more that weren't, as it should be with anthologies of this kind. Of course, with such a diverse range of themes and all new stories, you're never going to like all of them. I don't know if it was just me but I felt that the quality of the stories generally improved as the collection went on. Environmental catastrophy features features in Another instalment of new SF short stories demonstrating the breadth and depth that the genre has to offer in 2013. This contained some familiar authors but many more that weren't, as it should be with anthologies of this kind. Of course, with such a diverse range of themes and all new stories, you're never going to like all of them. I don't know if it was just me but I felt that the quality of the stories generally improved as the collection went on. Environmental catastrophy features features in quite a few stories such as “More” by Nancy Kress, “Shall Inherit” by James Lovegrove, “The Spires of Greme” by Kay Kenyon and “With Fate Conspire” by Vandana Singh. Alien contact is a predominate theme in others such as “Tom” by Paul Cornell, “Feast and Famine” by Adrian Tchaikovsky and “The Circle of Least Confusion” by Martin Sketchley. AI problems are explored in “Ticking” by Allen Steele and “Manmade” by Mercurio D. Rivera while time paradoxes are considered in “The Time Gun” by Nick Harkaway and “With Fate Conspire” by Vandana Singh. A few stories were particularly relevant to modern day concerns like in “Pearl in the Shell” by Neil Williamson in which music has been completely analysed, classified into it's essential categories and fully copyrighted so that no one bothers trying to write new music any more. In “The First Dance” by Martin McGrath we see the what might happen if there was a facility that could record all your memories to be played back at will...at the right price. And in “Whatever Skin You Wear” by Eugie Foster everyone has become so dependent on being hooked up to the net and hiding behind facades that widespread panic ensures when there is a brief outage of service. Also worth a mention (but hard to classify) is “The Lighthouse” by Liz Williams which presents a haunting vision of a potential future for humanity and “Bonds” by Robert Reed in which a fraudster who becomes rich after inventing a theory about the interconnectedness of everything turns out to have understood more about the true nature of the universe than anyone suspected. If you're a fan of SF, you're bound to find something of interest here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Another solid and diverse collection of contemporary science fiction.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eloise

    Nice collection of sci-fi shorts with an impressive range of themes, styles and settings. There's always some that work more for you than others in any collection, but I found this to be made of mostly hits, with a few "I don't know what the hell that was but the writing was good". Here are a few of my update notes to give you an idea of my more immediate reactions. "'Whatever skin you wear' - as weird as Gaia Online on steroids and simultaneously cute as hell." "Oof, Ticking reads like a late-ni Nice collection of sci-fi shorts with an impressive range of themes, styles and settings. There's always some that work more for you than others in any collection, but I found this to be made of mostly hits, with a few "I don't know what the hell that was but the writing was good". Here are a few of my update notes to give you an idea of my more immediate reactions. "'Whatever skin you wear' - as weird as Gaia Online on steroids and simultaneously cute as hell." "Oof, Ticking reads like a late-night gut punch from SyFy (still bitter about that) or Netflix. Just the way I like an apocalypse." "'Before Hope' - like Firefly meets Space Truckers but *better*" "'The First Dance' nearly made me cry." Overall I'm glad I read it and I'll be keeping my eyes open for contributors works at the library.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ren

    I was pleasantly surprised by how many of the stories I liked, it's usually a more even division of hit and miss. I think the diversity of themes being addressed helped to keep each story feeling fresh

  6. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    Most of these stories take place in interesting worlds, but the emotional narratives at the core of most of the stories just isn’t that powerful, or the worlds aren’t sketched with sufficient precision to stay with a reader. One that stood out for me is ‘Before Hope’, Kim Larkin-Smith, sketching a moment of worker resistance against a system of brutal oligarchy. I’d love to read a longer novel set in this universe. ‘Whatever Skin You Wear’, by Eugie Foster, stands out for another reason. (view s Most of these stories take place in interesting worlds, but the emotional narratives at the core of most of the stories just isn’t that powerful, or the worlds aren’t sketched with sufficient precision to stay with a reader. One that stood out for me is ‘Before Hope’, Kim Larkin-Smith, sketching a moment of worker resistance against a system of brutal oligarchy. I’d love to read a longer novel set in this universe. ‘Whatever Skin You Wear’, by Eugie Foster, stands out for another reason. (view spoiler)[It tries to address transgender acceptance by turning it into the (happy) surprise twist in a story set in a future in which people lives in their avatars not just online, but constantly, overlaying the physical world. This book was published in 2013, the story presumably written not long before, but it already feels dated - but perhaps the question of acceptance by a lover is perpetual, or at least less time bound than the question of broader social acceptance. At any rate, the subgenre of the story is interestingly indeterminate until close to the end - it could be horror, it could be apocalyptic, but then it turns out to be intimate, sentimental, and sweet. (hide spoiler)] .

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sue Chant

    An adequate but unremarkable collection. The one story that really stood out for me was Nick Harkaway's "The Time Gun".

  8. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Beagley

    Fun, adequate. Short stories never have enough time to breathe or develop a premise and a character clearly. I will keep reading them, but there was nothing in here I can especially recommend.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mieneke

    In 2011 Solaris revived the Solaris Book of New Science Fiction series with Solaris Rising . I greatly admired the book and really enjoyed it. In my conclusion to the review I said I hoped that the book would be a success so there would be more instalments in the series. Evidently it was, as here I am with a review for Solaris Rising 2. The collection of authors is quite different from the last one with some names I wouldn't have expected in an SF setting, such as Adrian Tchaikovsky. There wer In 2011 Solaris revived the Solaris Book of New Science Fiction series with Solaris Rising . I greatly admired the book and really enjoyed it. In my conclusion to the review I said I hoped that the book would be a success so there would be more instalments in the series. Evidently it was, as here I am with a review for Solaris Rising 2. The collection of authors is quite different from the last one with some names I wouldn't have expected in an SF setting, such as Adrian Tchaikovsky. There were two stories that didn't really work for me, mostly due to their ending. Robert Reed's Bonds started of interesting enough telling the story of a young man with serious mental issues who becomes a cult idol due to a spurious theory about the nature of the universe. I liked the tale but at one point the story turns from a tale about an elaborate con into something that might actually be true, at which point Reed lost me and by the ending the story just fell flat for me. Martin Sketchley's The Circle of Least Confusion consisted of interesting concepts, lost me with the dual storylines and the contrived way of getting the gadget in the hands of the protagonist. I also had a hard time relating to the way Kate, the female main character, didn't tell her partner she was pregnant when she found out. That's a completely personal reaction though, as it's completely opposite of my own experiences in that regard. The ending also felt rather abrupt and I was left with questions regarding the fate of the alien sniper, who featured in the story. Even though this anthology is meant to show the variety and scope of SF, there are some themes that repeat, such as time travel, the malleability of history, and the interplay between humanity and technology. There is a nice mixture of earth-bound and off-world stories. But the stories I enjoyed most were almost all stories that dealt with human(oid) emotions – the misunderstandings that are possible due to lack of communication of emotions, intersection between the other and human emotion – and with history and its fragility, both literally and figuratively. Paul Cornell's Tom is a beautiful love story, not just of a man and a woman, albeit an alien one, but also of a father for his son, even if that son is completely unique. The complexity of parental love and the unconditionality of the nameless protagonist's love for his boy definitely struck a chord with me. Neil Williamson's Pearl in the Shell shows the development of music, of human connectivity through technology, and the creative process that is completely focused on finding something new, something that hasn't been done before to avoid having to pay massive royalty fees to earlier creators. It's taking the entertainment industry's current attitude to copyrights to extreme and makes for an interesting narrative. When Thomas Jefferson Dined Alone by Kristine Katherine Rusch is a time travel story set in the world of academia, where history scholars are able to flies on the wall of their historical subjects and deals with not just the effects of these visits on our understanding of history, but also on history itself, when history seems to be changing incrementally and not in a way you'd expect. Mercurio D. Rivera's Manmade is the story of the effects of gaining full emotional cognizance on artificial intelligence, it's a futuristic, subverted Pinocchio story with robots instead of a wooden puppet. I loved the emotional depth of the story and the protagonist's feeling of helplessness to help not just the boy who comes to her for help, but also her own son. Liz Williams' The Lighthouse is almost an origin story and shows that history is always shaped by the ones who write it. Is the truth we learn from our narrator the truth? Or is it a fiction that has grown into truth over the ages? I liked the tone and ending of the story and the way it made me think about history. Solaris Rising 2 is a wonderful second volume in the New Solaris Book of Science Fiction and with it I hope it gains a permanent place on the roster at Solaris. Looking at the recently announced addition of Jonathan Strahan's The Best SFF of the Year to the Solaris stable of anthologies, in addition to the other anthology series they have running, it looks like Solaris is creating a strong position in the anthology business, so a permanent spot on the roster seems likely. Just as the first book in the series, Solaris Rising 2 is a great introduction to SF and some of its most talented authors. This book was provided for review by the publisher.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Clare O'Beara

    Science fiction anthology with a variety of tales to suit a variety of tastes. In 'Tom' by Paul Cornell, marine aliens arrive and make themselves at home, much like dolphins that can live on land too, and we go and clean up the seas. Gated communities live expensively in domes while poor people and eco-terrorists gather outside; self-replicating nano-machines which gobble up an oil spill and just keep going threaten Earth and for some reason all the people with autism are to be sent away and save Science fiction anthology with a variety of tales to suit a variety of tastes. In 'Tom' by Paul Cornell, marine aliens arrive and make themselves at home, much like dolphins that can live on land too, and we go and clean up the seas. Gated communities live expensively in domes while poor people and eco-terrorists gather outside; self-replicating nano-machines which gobble up an oil spill and just keep going threaten Earth and for some reason all the people with autism are to be sent away and saved. Some stories are very old themes, like people who meet up in online game lives and never in RL, and time travel, and a spaceship disaster. If anything has changed, it is the language and assumed technology making them more modern in feel. People studying Lincoln via time travel add the data to Wikipedia. A forest has turned semi-sentient and defends itself against people due to genetic manipulation; references are made to China's one child policy, the Sentient Equal Rights Act, to Hillary Clinton. Norman Spinrad is the best-known name, and he contributes a brief story about interstellar travel, a narration of a science and a journey but sadly lacking any characters. Other contributors include an Indian woman with a PhD in physics and a woman who runs a witchcrafting supply store in England. Several authors have been nominated for various SF awards, some have won, and Allen Steele we are told in 2001, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives in hearings regarding the future of space exploration. SF has always tried to imagine and address challenges for us, and SOLARIS RISING, edited by Ian Whates, is good dip-into reading, though no tale is long enough to address a subject in any length. I didn't take to some of the tales or styles, but we're all different.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Willy Eckerslike

    I seem to have had a bit of a short story binge recently, probably on account of the inordinate period of time between novels from my usual preferred authors. Short stories are a great way to encounter new authors and make the perfect vehicle for science fiction; there’s should be no room for padding or tedious info-dumps, just taut craftsman-like storytelling. Perhaps it is because I found ‘The Edge of Infinity’ collection so compelling, but the stories in this compendium are a bit of a mixed ba I seem to have had a bit of a short story binge recently, probably on account of the inordinate period of time between novels from my usual preferred authors. Short stories are a great way to encounter new authors and make the perfect vehicle for science fiction; there’s should be no room for padding or tedious info-dumps, just taut craftsman-like storytelling. Perhaps it is because I found ‘The Edge of Infinity’ collection so compelling, but the stories in this compendium are a bit of a mixed bag. There are, however, some absolute crackers early-on in the volume, notably Paul Cornell’s cross species hybrid story; Nancy Kress’ near future post-apocalyptic vision; and Nick Harkaway’s comedic take on the old time travel paradox. There are splendid stories of seed ships, nano-technology, sentient forests, early post-human oddness, more time travel…the list goes on. There are, however, a disappointing number of somewhat dull, introspective, one-dimensional stories with very little science fiction content later in the volume. They have an alarmingly ‘Young Adult’ feel to them; generally shallow and as far from science fiction as McDonalds is from a Michelin starred restaurant. It is, of course, all a matter of taste which is the wonder of short stories and of the science fiction genre; not everybody will enjoy every story. I hugely enjoyed most of the early stories but got bored by the later ones, but hey, that’s just me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hanscom

    As with any anthology, some stories are better than others -- or perhaps it's more fair to say that some stories will speak to particular people more than others. There are quite a few good stories (for me, "Whatever Skin You Wear" and "The First Dance" stood out), and the rest are okay, nothing I'd particularly call bad. There were a couple unfortunate missteps; the very first story ("Tom") uses "tranny", which I've come to see as a perjorative, and I'm not sure whether it's usage was supposed As with any anthology, some stories are better than others -- or perhaps it's more fair to say that some stories will speak to particular people more than others. There are quite a few good stories (for me, "Whatever Skin You Wear" and "The First Dance" stood out), and the rest are okay, nothing I'd particularly call bad. There were a couple unfortunate missteps; the very first story ("Tom") uses "tranny", which I've come to see as a perjorative, and I'm not sure whether it's usage was supposed to be in character or whether it's simply poor word choice by the author, and a later story ("Ticking") has an unfortunate and glaring continuity error share a flashlight is dropped twice without being picked up in between. All in all, not a bad collection, but I didn't find it stellar; rather, the hit-and-miss you'd expect from just about any such collection.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    There were some good stories, and science fiction is not dead. Yadda yadda. The first story, or one that was very close to first, ruined a perfectly good story with a completely frivolous, unnecessary use of the word 'tranny'. :P A story shortly after that was all about sending kids with Asperger's into space to save the human race. It made no sense whatsoever. And while I am not on the autism spectrum or know anyone very closely who is, it struck me as not a very good portrayal. Very Othering. Ano There were some good stories, and science fiction is not dead. Yadda yadda. The first story, or one that was very close to first, ruined a perfectly good story with a completely frivolous, unnecessary use of the word 'tranny'. :P A story shortly after that was all about sending kids with Asperger's into space to save the human race. It made no sense whatsoever. And while I am not on the autism spectrum or know anyone very closely who is, it struck me as not a very good portrayal. Very Othering. Another story just past the middle (I checked, because I know the weakest stories are usually in the middle) was so completely long-winded and boring. It needed serious editing. Like, more than half of it could've gone and it would've been such a better, tighter story. Still not all that great, but better. More men than women in the antho.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    As with most short story collections, there are a wide range of styles and approaches to what is touted as “groundbreaking science fiction.” Straight science fiction isn’t my first choice, so it was really nice to dive back into the genre with tastings of a wide range of subject matter and authors. This is also a finalist for the Philip K Dick award, (http://www.philipkdickaward.org/) though collections of short fiction don’t often win awards. With such a cross section, there’s bound to be mixed As with most short story collections, there are a wide range of styles and approaches to what is touted as “groundbreaking science fiction.” Straight science fiction isn’t my first choice, so it was really nice to dive back into the genre with tastings of a wide range of subject matter and authors. This is also a finalist for the Philip K Dick award, (http://www.philipkdickaward.org/) though collections of short fiction don’t often win awards. With such a cross section, there’s bound to be mixed feelings throughout, the quite good alongside the okay, peppered with the occasional true dislike. Still, I walked away with my brain running and some new authors on my “to read” list.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Derwin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michele Cariveau

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  19. 4 out of 5

    Todd

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Harpal Singh

  22. 5 out of 5

    Will

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mrs Jane Common

  24. 4 out of 5

    John Hammonds

  25. 4 out of 5

    James

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yesiamclutz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Philip Chaston

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cm Lubinski

  29. 5 out of 5

    Don

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Mailund

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