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Wolverine

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The master of mutants joins the master of ninjas in Wolverine's first solo series - replete with romance, intrigue and mayhem! Our beleaguered berserker's in Japan on a mission of the heart, if he can survive the Hand first! Plus: the introduction of everyone's favorite riotous ronin, Yukio! Collects Wolverine #1-4, Uncanny X-Men #172-173.


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The master of mutants joins the master of ninjas in Wolverine's first solo series - replete with romance, intrigue and mayhem! Our beleaguered berserker's in Japan on a mission of the heart, if he can survive the Hand first! Plus: the introduction of everyone's favorite riotous ronin, Yukio! Collects Wolverine #1-4, Uncanny X-Men #172-173.

30 review for Wolverine

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs

    My name’s Wolverine. Have you got that? No? Okay I shall tell you again. My name’s Wolverine. This is my story. My name is Wolverine and I’m invincible. My name is Wolverine and I have an adamantium skeleton. I’m Wolverine. Okay. That’s my name: Wolverine. I can heal myself because I am called Wolverine. It’s my name, Wolverine that is. Do I need to tell you again? I’m Wolverine I can’t die, so there’s no point reading this because there is no possibility that I will be defeated because my name My name’s Wolverine. Have you got that? No? Okay I shall tell you again. My name’s Wolverine. This is my story. My name is Wolverine and I’m invincible. My name is Wolverine and I have an adamantium skeleton. I’m Wolverine. Okay. That’s my name: Wolverine. I can heal myself because I am called Wolverine. It’s my name, Wolverine that is. Do I need to tell you again? I’m Wolverine I can’t die, so there’s no point reading this because there is no possibility that I will be defeated because my name is Wolverine. Oh dear. This was so fucking repetitive. Logan’s monologue just lingered on the same ideas; he kept explaining his abilities over and over across issues. I grew so bored of him. It wasn’t just him though that made this so poor. The side characters were inconsistent; they refused to behave in certain ways because of the sake of honour, but by the end they would do it anyway. Such hypocrites. I hate to repeat the ignorant assumption made by some Westerners that Asian people all look the same, but the Japanese in here did look the same. It was like the same face model had been used for each one, two of the women looked almost identical. I got terribly confused. Perhaps it was just me? Then there is also the fact that every single Asian character seems to know martial arts. Isn’t that just a little bit stupid? Most of the characters had swords. Some were ninjas and there were even a couple of sumo wrestlers. I mean seriously? It’s like Japan only consists of these types of people according to the writers of this. At points it’s like the Japanese culture was viewed through a pair of stereotyping goggles. This just annoyed me. It’s like saying all English people drink tea or all American’s are fat. This comic was just dreadful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    "I am Wolverine. I am the best there is at what i do." This edition covers Wolverine's very first limited series and two Uncanny X-Men issues which cover the continuation of Wolverine's story arc. When Logan's sweetheart, Mariko Yashida ceases to reply to his letters, he takes the next flight out to japan to find her. *Soap opera fans gasp* Like every broken-hearted guy, Logan goes through the stages: Denial, confrontation, bargaining, getting beaten up, getting drunk, picking up fight "I am Wolverine. I am the best there is at what i do." This edition covers Wolverine's very first limited series and two Uncanny X-Men issues which cover the continuation of Wolverine's story arc. When Logan's sweetheart, Mariko Yashida ceases to reply to his letters, he takes the next flight out to japan to find her. *Soap opera fans gasp* Like every broken-hearted guy, Logan goes through the stages: Denial, confrontation, bargaining, getting beaten up, getting drunk, picking up fights, rebound love and reckless dares! Well, not exactly like a regular guy...A regular guy doesn't ends up being used as a pawn for mafia takeovers or ends up killing hundreds of assassins. But hey, it's Wolverine.... What did you expect? The Four-issue Wolverine limited series does one hell of a job combining Japanese theme and Wolverine's wildness. The ending of first chapter introduces Yukio, a crazy assassin with THE MOST irritating catchphrase. Please stop. The final two chapters are Uncanny X-men issues which follows up the story, but ends up being anti-climatic. Nevertheless, this is one of the first and finest Wolverine story which goes beyond mindless action and boasts a superior story and an excellent characterization.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    This collects Wolverine #1-4 (the limited series from 1982) plus Uncanny X-Men #172-173 (I'm guessing from the same year). It forms a cohesive whole, but the two X-Men comics that conclude the story are the weak link. In the first two thirds of the collection, the character focus is solely on Wolverine. The last two issues collected here, although still dealing with the Wolverine storyline, spends a lot of time on the character of Storm and refers heavily to previous events surrounding Jean Grey This collects Wolverine #1-4 (the limited series from 1982) plus Uncanny X-Men #172-173 (I'm guessing from the same year). It forms a cohesive whole, but the two X-Men comics that conclude the story are the weak link. In the first two thirds of the collection, the character focus is solely on Wolverine. The last two issues collected here, although still dealing with the Wolverine storyline, spends a lot of time on the character of Storm and refers heavily to previous events surrounding Jean Grey / Phoenix. This shift in character focus is, frankly put, jarring, and breaks the story's rhythm. However, this is still one of the best Wolverine stories you're likely to read. It is the Japan sequence, and also the story being referenced (somewhat loosely) in the 2013 film The Wolverine. You'll be glad to know that there are no giant Adamantium robot samurais in the book. Instead, you have some ninja assassins, loads of intrigue and the villainous pairing of The Silver Samurai and Viper (and no, she's not a long-tongued mutant here either). This is a good example of why you should rather read the stories than watch the films. Anyway, I digress. The story is very good. I think this was Wolverine's first appearance in a series of his own. The Frank Miller art is glorious, even if it has that 80s thing going, and Claremont is obviously no slouch in the writing department if this collection is any indication. Highly recommended. This is mandatory reading for Wolverine fans. The only reason I'm not giving it five stars is the X-Men issues - I can't help but wonder how this would have been if Claremont/Miller had completed it under the Wolverine banner...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ozan

    It was so much fun to read the book. Gave me a chance to sample the one of the most praised writters of comics, Chris Claremont and i liked his writting. I will definetly try his X-Men. The story was very modern, it didn't feel dated but then again as far as i know 80s is the foundation of modern comics so it is being still good is not a big surprise. Wolverine and his history with Japan is amazing. (I love Japan) I would love to see more, like how he met with Mariko Yashida for the first time an It was so much fun to read the book. Gave me a chance to sample the one of the most praised writters of comics, Chris Claremont and i liked his writting. I will definetly try his X-Men. The story was very modern, it didn't feel dated but then again as far as i know 80s is the foundation of modern comics so it is being still good is not a big surprise. Wolverine and his history with Japan is amazing. (I love Japan) I would love to see more, like how he met with Mariko Yashida for the first time and all of his time in japan before the mini. Wolverine's fights against ninjas were all so much fun to read even if i was like ''they are partying like it's 1580'' lol i mean katanas, shirukens and even Wolverine was like ''i don't usually do that but i will use a weapon this time'' and he brought a crossbow with him and hunted the ninjas with that lol Hello ! There are more efficient ways of killing people, you know... Have any of you guys ever heard of GUNS ! lol Yukio the wild one was a fun character, i liked her. I wish they showed what Yukio did with Storm to change her in to that crazy punk new look in The 2 issues of Uncanny X-Men which came after The 4 issues Wolverine mini in The HC. And ofcourse the guy who brain washed Mariko to not to marry Wolverine... Who was that guy ? Did he hypnose Mariko or something ? the end stayed dangling in the air with questions... I really want to read that era Clearmont X-Men to find out where all of those go now... It's certainly a minus that the book doesn't have a satisfying conclusion :/ and it's the only minus, really, oh there was Wolverine explaning his powers at every issue's begining too xD i was like ok i got it ! after the second time xD but i gave the book 5 stars never the less :D Wolverine fanboy reporting for duty :D

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    This is one of those books where it doesn't even really matter how good it is. This is the 4-issue mini-series from 1982, perhaps the first solo issues Wolverine really had*, six years before Wolverine finally got his own on-going series. If you are a Wolverine fan, it's required reading. I don't even know why you're reading this. Just pick up a copy. Maybe you want to hear about the two X-Men issues included. Fair enough. The 4 issue series is very Wolverine focused (of course), but the two X-Me This is one of those books where it doesn't even really matter how good it is. This is the 4-issue mini-series from 1982, perhaps the first solo issues Wolverine really had*, six years before Wolverine finally got his own on-going series. If you are a Wolverine fan, it's required reading. I don't even know why you're reading this. Just pick up a copy. Maybe you want to hear about the two X-Men issues included. Fair enough. The 4 issue series is very Wolverine focused (of course), but the two X-Men issues are less so. There is a lot more focus on Storm, and there are some references to Jean that won't make sense because, hey, we're coming in at issue 172 of a series. That there are loose ends all over is just how it goes, but I will say that the two X-Men issues are weaker than the mini-series for that reason. They are still worth your time though because of Rogue. At this time, Rogue is still a new character (first appearance was 9 months earlier) who had started out as a villain. I enjoyed the interactions between Wolverine and Rogue as Wolverine tries to not hate her for what she did to Carol Danvers, and Rogue just tries to gain acceptance. The issues were fun 25 years ago when I first read them and they are fun now. They just don't wrap up nicely like the mini-series does. *I didn't go back and read all the old X-Men books to see if he got solo stories there, but my memory says "not really."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    KILL BILL! [image error] Or at least that is what I think of when I read this story since both main characters (Wolverine and the Bride) had to go to Japan to fight off their rivals. Brief Introduction: When I was looking through the comic book boards and I wanted to know what the best “Wolverine” story was, many fans declared that “Wolverine” which was written by Chris Claremont along with artwork by Frank Miller was considered the best “Wolverine” story out there. So, I went out and go KILL BILL! [image error] Or at least that is what I think of when I read this story since both main characters (Wolverine and the Bride) had to go to Japan to fight off their rivals. Brief Introduction: When I was looking through the comic book boards and I wanted to know what the best “Wolverine” story was, many fans declared that “Wolverine” which was written by Chris Claremont along with artwork by Frank Miller was considered the best “Wolverine” story out there. So, I went out and got this graphic novel and I have to agree with the fans that this was indeed one of the best “Wolverine” stories out there! This also features the first four issues in Wolverine's new solo series during the 1980s which I was so impressed at seeing for the first time! Never have I have seen so much drama, romance and action contained into one graphic novel and because of that, “Wolverine” has remained to be one of my all time favorite “X-Men” stories about Wolverine! What is the story? Wolverine heads off to Japan to find the love of his life, Mariko Yashida, who is the daughter of Lord Shingen who is the Lord of the Clan Yashida, but discovers that his lover has married someone else, which breaks his heart. Along the way, Wolverine meets up with a mysterious assassin named Yukio who seems to know about Lord Shingen’s plans to take over all of the major crime gangs in Japan. Wolverine must put a stop to Lord Shingen’s evil plans to rule as the ultimate crime lord of Japan before it is too late! What I loved about this comic: The premise and Chris Claremont’s writing: I will admit that when I heard about this graphic novel, I did not know what to expect from another book about Wolverine and I actually thought that we would get another “Wolverine” book that is all about the fighting and Wolverine acting tough. However, in this graphic novel, what we got was an extremely thought-provoking and heartwarming tale about Wolverine’s romance with Mariko and his inner struggles with dealing with his “animal” side. I loved the way that Chris Claremont has shown us a more sensitive side to Wolverine as he struggles to get the love of his life back while dealing with the customs of her family, which the importance of honor and pride plays a huge role in his story. I also loved the intense kung-fu atmosphere of this story as it gave this story a more creative approach to Wolverine’s time in Japan and made the story exciting to read through. Chris Claremont has done an excellent job at writing this story from Wolverine’s point of view on the situation as we are able to see how Wolverine reacts to the situations he gets involved in Japan whether he is confessing his love for Mariko or fighting ninjas out to get him. It was also interesting seeing how Wolverine viewed himself and Chris Claremont does a brilliant job at portraying Wolverine’s insecurity about being seen as an animal as he usually uses violence to solve his problems. I really enjoyed the tone shift that Chris Claremont had provided when he introduced the other X-Men (Colossus, Storm, Cyclops, Kitty Pryde and Nightcrawler) in the second story that was apart of "Uncanny X-Men" as Wolverine’s solo series was dark, while the "Uncanny X-Men" storyline was a bit light toned. Frank Miller and Paul Smith’s artwork: When I heard that Frank Miller was doing the artwork for this graphic novel, I was actually blown away by this information because before I read this graphic novel, I was reading “Batman: Year One” which was a graphic novel that Frank Miller wrote himself and I was surprised that Frank Miller has actually done some artwork during his time at the comic book industry. Frank Miller’s artwork was fantastic as they greatly captured the fight scenes in this story. I loved the colorings that were done whenever the characters were in shadows as there are dark colorings shadowed on the characters’ faces which really gives off a foreboding feel to the situation. I also loved Frank Miller’s artwork on the fight scenes, especially the scenes where Wolverine is fighting a group of ninjas and the scene where Wolverine is punching the ninjas is effectively done. In the “Uncanny X-Men” issues of this graphic novel, Paul Smith did a brilliant job at detailing the fight scenes and the characters’ facial expressions and I loved the way that the colorings are much brighter in these issues than in Frank Miller’s artwork in the “Wolverine” issues. What made me feel uncomfortable about this book: The only problem that some readers might find with this graphic novel is that there is some violence in the fight scenes. The violence usually has Wolverine cutting into another character and you can see some blood squirt out of the wounds. Now, the violence is actually pretty low-key here as sometimes the blood is not as realistically shown as it usually is in current comics, but the scenes of Wolverine cutting into people might upset some readers. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Wolverine” is definitely one of the best stories dealing with Wolverine and anyone who is a fan of Wolverine or the X-Men in particular; I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND this graphic novel to any comic book fan! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 to 3.5 stars. He's the best there is at what he does and what he does isn't very nice. This omnibus collects the excellent four issue mini series by Frank Miller. Recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    Wolverine's vacation, which involves him fighting a metric ton of ninja. What's not to love about that?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    Meh. Frank Millers art was great in this as you could expect, but this comic was honestly just kinda boring

  10. 4 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    This collection contains the original Wolverine series, released in late 1982, along with two follow-up issues of the Uncanny X-Men. It was the inspiration behind the 2013 movie The Wolverine, which motivated me to pick it up. Logan travels to Japan to confront his lady love, who is engaged to another man. He becomes entangled in a complex Yakuza plot which he defuses with diplomatic class, skill, and grace by rampaging through half of Tokyo with his giant, adamantium claws. Overall I really enj This collection contains the original Wolverine series, released in late 1982, along with two follow-up issues of the Uncanny X-Men. It was the inspiration behind the 2013 movie The Wolverine, which motivated me to pick it up. Logan travels to Japan to confront his lady love, who is engaged to another man. He becomes entangled in a complex Yakuza plot which he defuses with diplomatic class, skill, and grace by rampaging through half of Tokyo with his giant, adamantium claws. Overall I really enjoyed Chris Claremont’s story. The series attempts to humanize Wolverine by giving him something to care about (other than slicing his enemies into little pieces) without compromising the character’s feral nature. The Japanese elements were different and gave the story a unique feel. The artwork was strong and supplemented the story well. If the collection contained just the four issues published in the original Wolverine series, I would probably bump this up to four stars. However the two Uncanny X-Men issues, while relevant to the plot, were not quite as strong and were enough to drop this a half-star for me. Still, a fun read for those who are fans of the main character. Nothing earthshaking here, but very enjoyable. 3.5 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hayden

    First read this a little over a year ago when Darren Aronofsky was attached to direct a film adaptation (he's since abandoned it), just re-read it. I gave it 4 stars on my old review, and after letting it settle in for awhile, and then re-reading it, I'm convinced it's a 5 star comic. It's not brilliant, it's not mind blowing, and I couldn't imagine too many people seeing this from my point of view, but this book is just right up my alley. It feels like one of those old Shaw Bros. kung-fu movies First read this a little over a year ago when Darren Aronofsky was attached to direct a film adaptation (he's since abandoned it), just re-read it. I gave it 4 stars on my old review, and after letting it settle in for awhile, and then re-reading it, I'm convinced it's a 5 star comic. It's not brilliant, it's not mind blowing, and I couldn't imagine too many people seeing this from my point of view, but this book is just right up my alley. It feels like one of those old Shaw Bros. kung-fu movies, like when I read it, I felt like none of the words should match anyone's mouths. My favorite part is Frank Miller's art, which is amazing and just feels so vintage. I don't know how to explain it. One small thing that I love in comic book artwork, is when someone has black hair, and they shade it with a gleaming blue. It's a small thing, and you don't really see it anymore (except for Superman comics), but I love when they do that, haha. This is a fantastic comic, and a must-read for anyone breaking into the medium. If you're like me and the kind of person who listens to music while they read, I recommend listening to Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon album. The music matches perfectly, Money puts a really cool twist on the fight scenes, and Us And Them syncs up with the final scene almost eerily. 5/5

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Frank Miller has his fingerprints all over the last 30+ years of comics, creating classics for Dark Horse, DC, and Marvel. His resume includes Sin City, 300, some of the most notable Batman comics in recent memory, and a long run on Daredevil. But besides those accomplishments, I had no idea he also did the first four issues of Wolverine's solo run. And let me tell you, it holds up a lot better than I expected from a comic run circa 1982. It is set in Japan, with two intriguing and mysterious wo Frank Miller has his fingerprints all over the last 30+ years of comics, creating classics for Dark Horse, DC, and Marvel. His resume includes Sin City, 300, some of the most notable Batman comics in recent memory, and a long run on Daredevil. But besides those accomplishments, I had no idea he also did the first four issues of Wolverine's solo run. And let me tell you, it holds up a lot better than I expected from a comic run circa 1982. It is set in Japan, with two intriguing and mysterious women instigating Wolverine's actions, and for very different reasons. The storytelling is really top-notch, much more Yojimbo than X-Men Origins: Wolverine, thankfully. Wolverine is allowed to brood and brawl, and narrates the experience of being a gaijin, or outsider, for the reader. It's really perfect for his character, as a loner outsider wherever he wanders. The collection features not only Wolverine #1-#4, but also appends Uncanny X-Men #172-#173, where Storm, Rogue and the other X-Men get mixed up in the action when they travel to Japan for Wolverine's wedding.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    This was almost perfect, the type of focused comic I was wrongly looking for in a group X-Men comic. I'd give it 5 stars if not for the crappy ending (and maybe Rogue's dialog). Wolverine, a character with a very troubled past and plenty of color, somehow blends into the X-Men as only a hot-headed redneck dummy, which obviously isn't true. And here that's not the case. Wolverine covers Logan's time in Japan, with shoguns, samurai, ninjas, the works. Claremont "seems" to have really done his homew This was almost perfect, the type of focused comic I was wrongly looking for in a group X-Men comic. I'd give it 5 stars if not for the crappy ending (and maybe Rogue's dialog). Wolverine, a character with a very troubled past and plenty of color, somehow blends into the X-Men as only a hot-headed redneck dummy, which obviously isn't true. And here that's not the case. Wolverine covers Logan's time in Japan, with shoguns, samurai, ninjas, the works. Claremont "seems" to have really done his homework. Wolverine falls in love with Mariko, daughter of a Yakuza king. Trouble is Wolverine is not worthy (this is the theme). He fights Mariko's father, loses. Begins epic climb (with Yukio, who loves him) to prove his worthiness. Etc. etc. I liked the father as villain (not really) and the half brother Silver Samurai. Why 4 stars? Ughhhh the ending. I was grinning right until the end. It just makes no sense. It's like Claremont didn't know how to end this epic or it was a cheap way to keep the story going in another issue (which one I don't know but I'd like to!). Admittedly it was romantic but at least it was cohesive. But Mastermind comes out of nowhere in the very last panel and I was like son of a bitch! (view spoiler)[Seriously. He controls (?) or actually is (think about that for a second) Wolfie's girlfriend Mariko and he makes her NOT marry Wolverine in the very end. Come on! He's a miserable prick. Let him be happy! Everything has been building to this! (hide spoiler)] Perfect right until the end. But but but. This was great otherwise. I may even read some other standalone Wolfie comics now. And, so sorry, almost forgot. Frank Miller did a brilliant job with artwork here! So thanks to Claremont (and Miller) for redeeming my faith in 80s Wolverine, mostly.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Logan heads to Japan to be with his love, Mariko, only to find she's been married off by her drug lord father to a rich and powerful, but abusive, husband. And someone's trying to kill Logan of course. Cue extensive fight sequences involved ninja weapons, swords and ... snikt. Chris Claremont's story is pretty linear with Logan tussling with one group of foes before being knocked into another group and then being knocked back, etc. etc. This book showed that there are only so many silent fight sc Logan heads to Japan to be with his love, Mariko, only to find she's been married off by her drug lord father to a rich and powerful, but abusive, husband. And someone's trying to kill Logan of course. Cue extensive fight sequences involved ninja weapons, swords and ... snikt. Chris Claremont's story is pretty linear with Logan tussling with one group of foes before being knocked into another group and then being knocked back, etc. etc. This book showed that there are only so many silent fight scenes a reader can absorb before it becomes dull. You know Logan can't die so there's no tension, it's just waiting until he takes out whoever he's fighting. Frank Miller's art in the first 4 books is really good, and he provides at least one iconic image of Wolverine sans mask grinning and popping his claws. You can also see the beginnings of his Sin City style being tried out in this book as he experiments with shadows to tell a story than rely on shading or colours. There are 2 issues of "Uncanny X-Men" included after the initial 4-issue story arc to conclude the Logan/Mariko storyline but throws up other storylines involving the X-Men that you need to buy other X-Men books to see how they end (for some reason Storm getting a hair-cut is a big deal. Ah, the 80s... readers didn't ask for much did they?). "Wolverine" is a pretty tedious read for anyone who's read this character's other books. There's the detail on Logan's true love Mariko but other than that it's non-essential reading for general readers of comics. It's all action with no real interest in how it'll all turn out (as if it's going to end any other way than the expected!). Good art though.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kroese

    Clearly I'm missing something, based on the critical and popular reception of this book. I remember when this collection first came out, but I was more interested in Spider-Man and Daredevil at the time, so I never read it until Amazon put it on sale for $1.99. I don't feel like I overpaid, but I don't feel like I got a bargain either. The story is fine. It's nice to see another side of Wolverine, although I never figured out why he was so in love with this Japanese chick. Maybe there's more back Clearly I'm missing something, based on the critical and popular reception of this book. I remember when this collection first came out, but I was more interested in Spider-Man and Daredevil at the time, so I never read it until Amazon put it on sale for $1.99. I don't feel like I overpaid, but I don't feel like I got a bargain either. The story is fine. It's nice to see another side of Wolverine, although I never figured out why he was so in love with this Japanese chick. Maybe there's more background in other Wolverine/X-Men comics; I don't know. I never felt particularly invested in the character, and it never felt to me like he was ever in any real danger. That's the problem with having a character with a super-healing ability and an unbreakable skeleton: there's a lot of "Boy, it's a good thing I'm invulnerable, or that would have killed me!" The other thing I never understand about these stories is why Wolverine can take on 20 trained Hand assassins but a single old guy with a sword almost kills him. Is the old guy really *that* much better than these guys who have done nothing but trained to kill their entire lives? How does that happen? The Hand are like the redshirts of the Marvel universe: they exist to be dispatched quickly and easily. I feel a little bad for them. The art is mediocre. I know Frank Miller is supposed to be some kind of artistic genius (and I liked the minimalist style he applied to Daredevil and Bat Man: Year One), but his drawings here seem rushed and amateurish. A female Japanese assassin who I guess is supposed to look exotic just looks weird. The layout and coloring is typical for an 80s mass market comic book, which is to say not great. Overall, a decent read, but there's much more interesting stuff out there.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    2.5/5 Okay, even knowing this one is character-arc important, I am not sure it really did anything to show anything new of who Logan is. All it really does is Last Samurai him, in that he will always be noble enough for the sword of my family desu and better and stronger as a gaijin than we meek and noble people of Nippon-desu. /racism The breakdown: -Take a shot every time Logan compares himself to just about any animal or person, only better. Yawn. -Take a shot for bad Romanization of Japanese wo 2.5/5 Okay, even knowing this one is character-arc important, I am not sure it really did anything to show anything new of who Logan is. All it really does is Last Samurai him, in that he will always be noble enough for the sword of my family desu and better and stronger as a gaijin than we meek and noble people of Nippon-desu. /racism The breakdown: -Take a shot every time Logan compares himself to just about any animal or person, only better. Yawn. -Take a shot for bad Romanization of Japanese words. -Take a shot every time a Japanese character speaks in nothing but stereotypes. -Take a shot for typing out any accent! -Take a shot for the hilarity of seeing the word "Wolverine-chan" in print. I guarantee a good time if your standards aren't too literary. If they are, follow my instructions above and a good time will be had anyway. My God, is THIS the origin of placing every tough white guy in Japan to be more sugoi than the people from the culture there, or... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oomCI...

  17. 4 out of 5

    William Thomas

    I've never been emotionally attached to Wolverine as a character. I've always been more interested in the Summers boys and their drama than anything else. Wolverine wasn't anything to scoff at, though, and I thought his part in the X books was an absolute necessity. So I don't love Wolverine. But I like him a whole hell of a lot. Over the years I guess it was easy to become less and less enchanted with Wolverine as the stories became more convoluted. Chris Claremont spent 17 years molding the X- I've never been emotionally attached to Wolverine as a character. I've always been more interested in the Summers boys and their drama than anything else. Wolverine wasn't anything to scoff at, though, and I thought his part in the X books was an absolute necessity. So I don't love Wolverine. But I like him a whole hell of a lot. Over the years I guess it was easy to become less and less enchanted with Wolverine as the stories became more convoluted. Chris Claremont spent 17 years molding the X-Men into the the best selling series it remains today. With the popularity of Wolverine spilling over the brim of the X books, Marvel put Wolverine in the masterful hands of Claremont to enrich the Wolverine myths even further. With the help of Frank Miller, this four issue mini became the springboard for a torrid love affair with Wolverine and the comic-reading world. It's a fantastic story, told with a little too much exposition (which has always been Claremont's problem), which runs in the hardboiled vein, with plenty of crime, femme fatales, seedy underworld dealings, bars and alleys. It's a love story that helps to endear us to Wolverine, and a flurry of fists that gives us the action we've gotten used to in him. An instant classic, this volume demands to be read. It may be one of the, if not the single, purest Wolverine stories ever written. Grade: A

  18. 5 out of 5

    Max's Comic Reviews and Lists

    ウルヴァリン(Wolverine) SO! The legendary Wolverine miniseries with one of the most iconic and most influential stories for Marvel. I was actually very excited to read this story. And I am glad to say I had a good time reading it. Not a fantastic time, but I definitely liked the story. (Especially after Origin....ooooaaaa) Quite a lot of character building and plot thickening is accomplished in the mere 4 issues Claremont and Miller had. Logan is fully fleshed out in the best ways possible in these ウルヴァリン(Wolverine) SO! The legendary Wolverine miniseries with one of the most iconic and most influential stories for Marvel. I was actually very excited to read this story. And I am glad to say I had a good time reading it. Not a fantastic time, but I definitely liked the story. (Especially after Origin....ooooaaaa) Quite a lot of character building and plot thickening is accomplished in the mere 4 issues Claremont and Miller had. Logan is fully fleshed out in the best ways possible in these 4 issues. That’s my favourite thing about this book. The humanization of Logan’s character is absolutely essential. And the book tackled that very well. All the running dialogue in Logan’s head is frickin great. Thats why this is known as the most influential Wolverine book of all time. Because it informed the character like no one has ever seen before. The character of Mariko is good for one particular reason. She’s not a damsel in distress, so she was just a little more interesting than say Rose from Origin.(Last time sorry) But Yukio is the standout supporting character here. She was layered but predictable. She added a layer to the story that wasn’t there before. Shingen as the main villain was done pretty typically as I expected. Sure I always love a more intricately written villain, BUT he worked for what we needed here, and you could definitely tell he could kick Logan’s ass. The story is surprisingly mature. The story beats are nothing new but the way they are handled showed passion from the writer. The dialogue in he story as I said before was shockingly good sometimes, and other times.......it was BAAALLLS!! Yukio at one point says out loud, “My Foot! I Tripped! I’m Falling!” WHAT THE FUCK?! Why?? Who the hell says that shit? Y’know what? Next time I trip and fall, I’m gonna say: “I HAVE TRIPPED!! IM IN THE PROCESS OF FALLING OH NO THIS IS GOING TO HURT LIKE A BITCH!!!” The dialogue is pretty terrible sometimes but most of it is good stuff. Something that was always awesome was the combat. Frank Miller has an affinity for drawing some of the best combat ever. He did this in all his Daredevil stuff as well. He showed every punch thrown. There usually was not a move missed. But this is the best combat he’s ever drawn BESIDES the The Dark Knight Returns. Cuz that’s pretty unbeatable. I’ll talk more about the art later. My negatives with the book are not anything overbearing. The dialogue as I said is inconsistent, and there are sometimes waaaaaayyy to many characters. Like bruh I got confused so damn often. Even when reading the Uncanny X-Men issues that are collected here, I was constantly trying to remember who the hell everybody was talking about! But that of course doesn’t make me hate the book. It was just annoying. Uncanny X-Menissues #172-173 are a straight up continuation of the miniseries. That makes sense and all but if you were just planning on buying he miniseries back then, well you probably didn’t know the REAL ending was. I thought these 2 issues were fine. I was mildly entertained and there is some good writing in them. But man was a lot of the other X-Men stuff tough to get through. Rouge’s dialogue is frickin horrible and the whole subplot with Storm and Yukio almost put me to sleep. The ending is not what I expected, and unexplained. But I’m not gonna fault the book for that. Frank Miller’s art style from the late 70s to late 80s is one of my favourite art styles EVER. After the 80s it became the some worst art I’ve probably ever seen. So there’s that. But the art here is just frickin clean dude. Absolutely phenomenal work by Miller here. Love this art. I’m glad I finally know what’s behind the that iconic #1 cover. I liked the story quite a bit and think that this is the most important Wolverine story for you to read before anything else. Skip Origin, and read Weapon X just for context. This book makes Logan a really compelling character that I am actually excited to read now. Thank you. There are a few problems and underwhelming aspects here and there but this is a satisfying book with fantastic artwork by a fallen legend. Letter Grade: (B+)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Koen

    At first I reaaaaally didn't like the colouring, but then I realized it was written in the 80's and it grew on me ;) Storywise it certainly was a win! Only the narrative felt too old (of course) and bit of a hassle to read at times... but all in all a strong album and a must read for the Wolverine fans

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    The title page says this is written by Chris Claremont. I'm calling shenanigans on that one since this bears all of the hallmarks of an early 80s Frank Miller story, who just happens to be the illustrator on this little X-Men related gem of a comic. Fast pacing, lots of action, ninjas and an introspective, brooding hero who narrates his way through what resembles a story but what looks a lot to me like one long well structured action scene. Because even when he's fast asleep Frank Miller can writ The title page says this is written by Chris Claremont. I'm calling shenanigans on that one since this bears all of the hallmarks of an early 80s Frank Miller story, who just happens to be the illustrator on this little X-Men related gem of a comic. Fast pacing, lots of action, ninjas and an introspective, brooding hero who narrates his way through what resembles a story but what looks a lot to me like one long well structured action scene. Because even when he's fast asleep Frank Miller can write and draw a stunning, epic tale and four issues of his Wolverine wandering around Japan, getting in scrapes, falling in love twice, fighting ninjas and mostly nearly dying is pretty much what I'd call a blast. It's basically a rehash of what Miller was doing on Daredevil at the time and without the build-up around the character and dozens of issues to play with it doesn't come close to having the same dramatic effect. Furthermore its pretensions to being a story about Japan and allusions to Japanese honour are a little tiresome. Miller is quite respectful with it so it never seems offensive, just reverential, but generally the talk of Japanese honour and culture feels a little hollow and reads like a cliche. But then Miller trades on cliches, he just makes us realise why some story tropes are so much exciting fun and well worth re-using. As ever, when Miller's name is on the book one of the main draws is the artwork, and this comic is another reminder of just how much Miller revolutionised the comics industry. Again, it feels a little like these pages could be Daredevil offcuts but even so nearly every one of them is jaw-dropping to look at, with Miller's work drawing you through the story swiftly and engagingly. Action flows and feels dynamic in a Miller comic, characters feel alive, real and threatening. Characters feel menacing in the way they are painted, Miller never strikes for realism, everything is a hyper real symbol that leaps out and across the page in striking ways. Whether you like X-Men or Wolverine generally, read this if you like Frank Miller. No, read this if you like comics. If you don't like Frank Miller you probably don't like comics much.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    One of the all time great Wolverine stories. This is the one that pushed him into the super star category. It's basically a really cool kung-fu movie, a bit heavy handed with the themes of 'honor', but makes up for it with tons of cool ninja action. One of marvel's very first mini-series and one of the big stories from before Wolverine became a annoying character that got over used.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    I came into comics too late to read Wolverine right off the shelf, but man, did I know about it. It was a grail title of mine, since I loved Wolverine's character, but it was always too expensive for me to buy to read. At some point, I wound up with the first issue, but I never got any further than that with the story. That first issue starts out strong, though, with an opening line as iconic as "The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed": "I'm the best there is at wha I came into comics too late to read Wolverine right off the shelf, but man, did I know about it. It was a grail title of mine, since I loved Wolverine's character, but it was always too expensive for me to buy to read. At some point, I wound up with the first issue, but I never got any further than that with the story. That first issue starts out strong, though, with an opening line as iconic as "The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed": "I'm the best there is at what I do, but what I do best isn't very nice." From there, we follow Logan hunting a bear that's been left for dead, but has instead gone on its own killing rampage. He finds the bear, kills it, and expresses remorse over the act since it had been driven to it; then, he tracks down the man who poisoned it but didn't kill it, fights him, and sends him to jail without any regrets. It sets the tone of his character, and shows him being more animal than man. In short, it defines all that is Wolverine. Then, it moves to Japan. Mariko is Logan's love, back in Japan and not accepting or sending letters. He goes to Japan to track her down, and becomes enmeshed in some crime drama related to Mariko's new husband. That's the point where the story goes off the rails and stops making sense. The Hand is involved, but it's hard to tell what's driving the crime gangs, and what their business actually is. For the story, Claremont only makes it clear that they're criminals, and organized. I guess he feels like this is all we need to know. What we do need to know, apparently, is Logan's backstory. We get it at the start of each issue. In four or five panels on one page, we get his name, hear about his mutant healing abilities, his adamantium-laced skeleton, and his claws. Even at the time of the title's publication, people knew who Wolverine was, and he was already a fan-favorite. Readers didn't need it reiterated with every issue, but that's what we get. Released back in 1982, Wolverine is a comic that shows its age. At its time, it might have been a little progressive; it seems like Claremont did some research into Japanese culture instead of just populating the story with offensive stererotypes, and having a female assassin might have bucked some trends at the time. Thirty-five years later, the culturalism comes across as stereotypical, and the female characters are little more than story-dressing. Mariko doesn't have any depth outside of her being a daughter, or Logan's love, and the assassin, Yuriko, is inconsistent. During a fight, she's cut by a sword, and Logan notes that she doesn't make a sound, because she's tough like that; later, she's threatened by a crime boss, who grabs and twists her wrist, and she cries out, saying, "You're hurting me!" That she falls in and out of a relationship with Logan only reinforces that inconsistency. I hadn't known Frank Miller had done the art in this book until I started reading it, and it's sufficient. It feels kinetic, and isn't done in such a way that things aren't clear (in fact, there's a scene where, mid-fight, Logan pulls an arrow from his arm to use against another assassin, and it's done subtly enough that it's not obvious, nor does it fade into the background), but parts of it made me laugh. Every time Logan snikts his claws, each one has to gleam in the light, and there were times when his mouth would be wide open in a yell (the better to show off those animalistic canines, my dear), only to be saying one word, quietly. The artwork didn't always match the mood of the story. I'll freely admit my expectations were too high for Wolverine, but man, did it let me down. It's too much a product of its time to hold up well so many years later.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Felicia Edens

    Seeing that at this point I would consider myself very new to the comic book world, this particular series, Wolverine #1-4 and Uncanny X-Men #172-173 was a great place to start, but only given the fact that I’ve already watched just about every Marvel (as well as DC) feature film that has been released since the ‘90’s. So, I am familiar with the character of Wolverine and that his bones are of indestructible adamantium metal due to a scientific experiment done to him by the shady Canadian govern Seeing that at this point I would consider myself very new to the comic book world, this particular series, Wolverine #1-4 and Uncanny X-Men #172-173 was a great place to start, but only given the fact that I’ve already watched just about every Marvel (as well as DC) feature film that has been released since the ‘90’s. So, I am familiar with the character of Wolverine and that his bones are of indestructible adamantium metal due to a scientific experiment done to him by the shady Canadian government agency Weapon X. Why did the government experiment on him? To create a super solider of course, for such is life in the world of superhero comics. I may add that many subjects of this kind, including Wolverine, are, indeed sadly, forced into it. Many already know that Wolverine is part of a band of superhero mutants called The X-Men. Even before he was experimented on, he was already different because he had a unique blend of healing power (any physical injury that harmed him would magically heal itself over a short period of time) and of claws, these being his bones that stretch out of his knuckles at will, although painfully. My particular fascination with Wolverine starts with the idea that he is an outsider at first, reluctant to join the group of fellow mutants, wanting only to live for himself and whatever else he holds dear. Even when he does join the X-Men he still is fiercely dedicated to his personal life and ideals, such as the life of a woman (the two loves of his life being Jean Grey, also from the X-Men and later, the royal Japanese princess Mariko), or, as in the beginning of this particular collection of comics, the life of a bear – an animal for whom he feels sympathy for, perhaps because he sees a bit of himself in him, that part being the primitive animal. Now, this makes for a really cool looking comic book. Frank Miller, who drew this series of comics is especially famous, and I know why, though I am not that well familiar with the art of comics yet to explain it. But my experience reading this story, after already having watched The Wolverine directed by James Mangold in 2013, was a positive one. I did not find the drawings from the ‘80s dated; the characters, in my opinion, had an aura of realism, and looking at facial expressions for cues was my favorite part of reading. I like this story – which starts with Wolverine saving a bear who was punctured by a poisonous arrow of a callous hunter who never finished the job, and then Wolverine killing the bear to save the poor animal from an slow death in agony, and finally finding the hunter to punish him… and I like how this entire comic features a ton of close-ups and extreme close-ups. Wolverine’s anger expressed in intricate lines, his frowning mouth, his furrowed eyebrows, all express the character in a completely unique way. When I’m reading a novel, I tend to read the print as a reflection, an afterthought, with lots of pauses for contemplation. When I read this comic book, everything seems to happen in real time, and the story flows steady, with every bit of it a part of the action. It’s not better per se, but it’s different, and although I know that this kind of reading is a good thing, I’ll be honest – I’m still trying to figure out why. Visual literacy – what exactly does this mean? I have the idea that the more I read comics, I’m going to be better able to answer that question. The rest of the comic book really focuses on Wolverine’s love for Mariko, again the royal Japanese princess, who he has been sending letters to for a while. He finds out that she never received them, or never opened them, due to the fact that she is being forced to marry out of a vague “obligation” her father had to someone he owed a debt to. Of course, it is Wolverine’s duty to get her out of this predicament, which has a lot of bumps in the road. His run in and brief romantic affair with Yukio, one of Mariko’s acquaintances, is presented beautifully, with super interesting renderings of body language. Wolverine’s encounters with Samurai and Yakuza usually ended up in lots of fight sequences, which were so intentional and explicit in both the penciling and coloring (which, I’m learning, is done by a different artist – this one by Glynis Wein) that it made for a quick and fun read. Lastly, I would like to mention the dialogue. Writer Chris Claremont juxtaposed the language of the Japanese men and women featured in the comic to Wolverine’s language - the former being direct and formal, and the latter being tinged with an accent. (For example the word “and” is said as “an’”. He also has an air of teasing - he famously uses the word “Bub”, many times when he’s patronizing his friends or enemies, as well as other colloquialisms such as “Darlin’” when referring to women.) I think this is brilliant and although this probably shouldn’t be considered an “ethnic joke”, especially compared to what I’ve heard about early comics, I still think that, like the ethnic jokes of the earlier comics, this may actually also have the power to “diffuse the tension” between groups (Rimer 5/22/16), or at least give audiences some exposure. Perhaps what I’ve written here is trivial to the broader world of comics, but like I’ve mentioned, I am very new to the genre, and these have been my honest thoughts on this series of Wolverine comics. I’d recommend it to all interested, and would regard this as a text for mature young readers and adults. "...I told him (Frank Miller) the idea that had been swirling about in my skull for some time - that the essence of Wolverine's character was a 'failed samurai'. To samurai, duty is all, selfless service the path to their ultimate ambition, death with grace. Every facet, every moment of their lives is absolutely under control. Wolverine, however, is almost a primal life force, totally beyond control, as graceless as can be. The one might be considered the ultimate expression of humanity - wherein the will, the intellect, totally overmaster all other aspects of existence - while the other is totally animal." - from the Introduction by Chris Claremont

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aleya

    I am not very fond of the older stuff. I hated the recap every issue about who Wolverine is and what's going on. It was annoying and I quickly tired of it. I didn't really like the story or the way characterization was handled either. It felt like they were puppets instead of real characters.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aggelos

    How much did Claremont actually wrote in this? Because everything seems pure Miller. The dialogue, the pacing, the plot. You can see how this is the same writer that wrote Sin City, Daredevil and TDK but you can't see the writer of X-men in this. Anyway, good book, some amazing splash pages and iconic quotes. Enjoyment for everyone.

  26. 4 out of 5

    sixthreezy

    I wanted to read this book after seeing The Wolverine because I had heard that it was loosely based on this classic run on Wolverine by Frank Miller and Chris Claremont. At first it started out very much like the film did, but the further along it progressed, the more it became obviously different than The Wolverine. I wasn't as impressed with this graphic novel as I thought I would have been. It's a neat story and a much different but clearly suitable setting for Wolverine, but I just have neve I wanted to read this book after seeing The Wolverine because I had heard that it was loosely based on this classic run on Wolverine by Frank Miller and Chris Claremont. At first it started out very much like the film did, but the further along it progressed, the more it became obviously different than The Wolverine. I wasn't as impressed with this graphic novel as I thought I would have been. It's a neat story and a much different but clearly suitable setting for Wolverine, but I just have never been much of a fan of older comics. It definitely has the older comic feel and look to it, and the inward writing of Wolverine's thought is scribbled on every page. I love seeing Wolverine in Japan and the concepts of honor, duty, and others within the code of Samurai apply to the character. The story was kind of confusing though, which isn't new for Frank Miller. Sometimes his stories can lose a reader with the depth of character writing that is presented. I did like however that Silver Samurai was who he was supposed to be, as opposed to who he was in The Wolverine. Also, Viper is presented in small doses and much more villainous than she was in the movie. Yukio didn't play as major of a role in the book either as she did in the movie, which I was disappointed by because she was one of the larger parts of why I liked the movie. A lot of the Yashida background was changed for the film, and I'm glad they made the changes they did. Had the film been a straight adaptation of this story, I don't think it would have been nearly as good. I like the liberties that were taken with The Wolverine, and I'm glad I have now read this classic Wolverine run. However, this is yet another classic X-Men tale that failed to impress me greatly, and further the opinion I have of DC being insurmountably better with adult storytelling than Marvel, though some stories such as this one exist in the Marvel Universe. In all honesty as well, who can beat the Wolverine as a badass character, as he is easily one of the most defined characters in the Marvel Universe, and comics in general. Originally posted at sixthreezy at the movies & more!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I learned recently from The Nerdist Comic’s Panel, possibly this one, http://www.nerdist.com/pepisode/nerdi..., that the immediate impetus for the creation of Wolverine was the facility a particular writer, perhaps Len Wein, had for writing accents. The Marvel Challenge Gauntlet was thrown: “create a hero with a Canadian accent!” and, a few trips to the library later, Wolverine was born. Short, hairy, smelly, Canadian. This Wolverine is recognizably derived from that Wolverine. It is not the Wolv I learned recently from The Nerdist Comic’s Panel, possibly this one, http://www.nerdist.com/pepisode/nerdi..., that the immediate impetus for the creation of Wolverine was the facility a particular writer, perhaps Len Wein, had for writing accents. The Marvel Challenge Gauntlet was thrown: “create a hero with a Canadian accent!” and, a few trips to the library later, Wolverine was born. Short, hairy, smelly, Canadian. This Wolverine is recognizably derived from that Wolverine. It is not the Wolverine I actually like; the one with a droll sense of humor, a fondness for beer, and a sense he’s gone through world weariness and back AGAIN with all the fighting things that are taller than him, so it’s time for another beer. This Wolverine was kinda dumb, kinda grandiose, kinda doesn’t realize you shouldn’t smoke while infiltrating the evil ninjas hideout, and kinda incapable of telling who his friends were. I can’t say I liked reading it, exactly. It was too bright, too flat, too angst-y, too non-Whedon-y. But it was recognizably the Whedon-y Wolverine that I like, before he got some deeper layers and twists in him. And it debuted one of the best lines in comics: “I am the best there is at what I do. And what I do is not very nice.” I think of that line sometimes when doing some of the RAP 16 parts of my job. Hate to say it, but I liked the movie more. Even if I don’t buy that Hugh Jackman is playing a Canadian wolverine.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robert Wright

    Well, as this collects both the original 1982 Wolverine mini-series and issues 172 & 173 of Uncanny X-Men, it should really be Wolverine by Claremont & Miller and Claremont & Paul Smith. But that's a minor concern. What this is (other than Marvel's attempt to cash in and tie in with the recent movie) is a stellar example of what originally made Claremont's run on X-Men great. This was the heyday of X-men becoming a big thing and regularly holding its own creatively and sales-wise among Marvel's b Well, as this collects both the original 1982 Wolverine mini-series and issues 172 & 173 of Uncanny X-Men, it should really be Wolverine by Claremont & Miller and Claremont & Paul Smith. But that's a minor concern. What this is (other than Marvel's attempt to cash in and tie in with the recent movie) is a stellar example of what originally made Claremont's run on X-Men great. This was the heyday of X-men becoming a big thing and regularly holding its own creatively and sales-wise among Marvel's big guns. This story may feel old hat to modern fans, but it was really the first time we get a deeper look at Logan and a true solo effort. Plus you get some great art, both from Miller in the mini-series and Smith in the regular issues. This particular reprint collection looks great. Nice paper and honest reproduction on the limited color palette available to a standard newsstand comic of the time. Those accustomed to today's computer colors and more advanced printing technology may look down on this. But Glynis Wein does a superb job within those limits and I'm glad they didn't attempt to modernize them. Page 69 is a perfect example of how a simple color scheme can pop dramatically and work better than many of the Photoshop overkill layouts we see today. If you just can't stomach 80s comic style, this is not for you. If you have a mind open to comics of every era on their own terms, this is a gem worth visiting again and again.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This story is often thrown around as the "best" Wolverine story. You could in some ways say it is the first Wolverine story. By that I mean it is when Claremont got pushed by Miller to finally flesh out Wolverine into someone that isn't just claws and vinegar (or perhaps beer). This makes for a pretty good story. You can definitely see Miller pushing the story, even if Claremont's words attempt to bring it down to his level of typical comic book fare. Frank Miller's art is a bit confused. You ca This story is often thrown around as the "best" Wolverine story. You could in some ways say it is the first Wolverine story. By that I mean it is when Claremont got pushed by Miller to finally flesh out Wolverine into someone that isn't just claws and vinegar (or perhaps beer). This makes for a pretty good story. You can definitely see Miller pushing the story, even if Claremont's words attempt to bring it down to his level of typical comic book fare. Frank Miller's art is a bit confused. You can see the strictures of the standard comic art of the time warring with what Frank Miller would become. The character Yukio especially will give you glimpses of his later character frames. I am not the biggest fan of Miller's art pre or post Dark Knight so I can't say this is an especially high point for me. Though I enjoyed the narrative of the paneling. I think Miller's influence on the story was more important to me than his art. Anyhow, if you want to get ready for the next movie, this is the book that they will likely be taking the majority of the story from. And for me it stood up as the best Wolverine story. I think it is a deserving descriptor, though obviously not everyone will take to it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tony Romine

    I've heard about this one since I first got into comics and now that I've read it, I don't understand the appeal. There are definitely better Wolverine storylines out there, better Chris Claremont books, and better Frank Miller artwork out there. I guess maybe that all three happened in one limited series is the real draw here? I don't know, I found it all kind of dated and boring. I suppose at the time though, it did expand on a character that needed it badly. The story has Wolverine in Japan tr I've heard about this one since I first got into comics and now that I've read it, I don't understand the appeal. There are definitely better Wolverine storylines out there, better Chris Claremont books, and better Frank Miller artwork out there. I guess maybe that all three happened in one limited series is the real draw here? I don't know, I found it all kind of dated and boring. I suppose at the time though, it did expand on a character that needed it badly. The story has Wolverine in Japan trying to win the hand of the Japanese woman he loves. In between he deals with ninjas (The Hand) and samurai (Silver Samurai). There aren't a lot of surprises, in fact my favorite part of this book was the very beginning where he is attacked by a bear and he kills it, then finds the hunter responsible for agitating it. Or at the end when Storm debuts her punk mowhawk hair style and Kitty Pryde freaks out, that was funny. I'd recommend it to a someone new to the genre, looking to read about Wolverine, but I'd point them toward WEAPON X first.

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