Hot Best Seller

Gifted Children: Myths And Realities

Availability: Ready to download

In this fascinating book, Ellen Winner uncovers and explores nine myths about giftedness, and shows us what gifted children are really like.Using vivid case studies, Winner paints a complex picture of the gifted child. Here we meet David, a three-year-old who learned to read in two weeks; KyLee, a five-year-old who mastered on his own all of the math concepts expected by t In this fascinating book, Ellen Winner uncovers and explores nine myths about giftedness, and shows us what gifted children are really like.Using vivid case studies, Winner paints a complex picture of the gifted child. Here we meet David, a three-year-old who learned to read in two weeks; KyLee, a five-year-old who mastered on his own all of the math concepts expected by the end of elementary school; and Nadia, an autistic and retarded “savant” who nevertheless could draw like a Renaissance master.Winner uses her research with these and several other extraordinary children, as well as the latest biological and psychological evidence, to debunk the many myths about academic, musical, and artistic giftedness.Gifted Children also looks at the role played by schools in fostering exceptional abilities. Winner castigates schools for wasting resources on weak educational programs for the moderately gifted. Instead, she advocates elevating standards for all children, and focusing our resources for gifted education on those with extreme abilities—children who are left untouched by the kinds of minimal programs we have today.


Compare

In this fascinating book, Ellen Winner uncovers and explores nine myths about giftedness, and shows us what gifted children are really like.Using vivid case studies, Winner paints a complex picture of the gifted child. Here we meet David, a three-year-old who learned to read in two weeks; KyLee, a five-year-old who mastered on his own all of the math concepts expected by t In this fascinating book, Ellen Winner uncovers and explores nine myths about giftedness, and shows us what gifted children are really like.Using vivid case studies, Winner paints a complex picture of the gifted child. Here we meet David, a three-year-old who learned to read in two weeks; KyLee, a five-year-old who mastered on his own all of the math concepts expected by the end of elementary school; and Nadia, an autistic and retarded “savant” who nevertheless could draw like a Renaissance master.Winner uses her research with these and several other extraordinary children, as well as the latest biological and psychological evidence, to debunk the many myths about academic, musical, and artistic giftedness.Gifted Children also looks at the role played by schools in fostering exceptional abilities. Winner castigates schools for wasting resources on weak educational programs for the moderately gifted. Instead, she advocates elevating standards for all children, and focusing our resources for gifted education on those with extreme abilities—children who are left untouched by the kinds of minimal programs we have today.

30 review for Gifted Children: Myths And Realities

  1. 4 out of 5

    Géraldine

    Intéressant mais inégal, avec tendance à l'amalgame entre précocité, don et handicap, ce qui me semble éloigné de la surdouance ! Cependant les exemples sont saisissants. A reprendre. Intéressant mais inégal, avec tendance à l'amalgame entre précocité, don et handicap, ce qui me semble éloigné de la surdouance ! Cependant les exemples sont saisissants. A reprendre.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    I like the author's balanced discussion of giftedness and talent, especially her look at the development of artistically gifted children. The book contains some fascinating examples of drawings. I like the author's balanced discussion of giftedness and talent, especially her look at the development of artistically gifted children. The book contains some fascinating examples of drawings.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Gifted Children is structured around the correction of common myths about gifted children by way of extensive discussion of fascinating research that has been undertaken in the field, which had me constantly flipping to the endnotes and taking note of articles to pursue in their entirety. It offers a great deal of insight into various cases of giftedness and the factors that might influence it early in life (such as the fact that “[f]irst and only children receive more adult stimulation in their Gifted Children is structured around the correction of common myths about gifted children by way of extensive discussion of fascinating research that has been undertaken in the field, which had me constantly flipping to the endnotes and taking note of articles to pursue in their entirety. It offers a great deal of insight into various cases of giftedness and the factors that might influence it early in life (such as the fact that “[f]irst and only children receive more adult stimulation in their early years in comparison to children born into families where siblings already exist”) as well as those that might correlate to the eventual direction of a gifted child’s future, with a particular focus on the influences of families and schools. Winner analogizes the abilities of gifted children and typical ones, pointing out, for example, that “[m]usically gifted children show great sensitivity to musical structure, and this astounds us because it is rare. In contrast, all children show great sensitivity to linguistic structure, and this we take for granted because it is universal.” I found one of the most interesting manifestations of giftedness to be the flexibility of the gifted mind, as demonstrated by the ability of musically gifted children to easily shift from one mode of representation to another as their teachers alternate between speaking of music “as a felt path, as a set of notations, as sound, and as structurer.” Besides examining the direct manifestations of their gifts, Gifted Children also explores in great depth the quite distinctive emotional lives of gifted youths. Among the many ways in which Winner is very interesting in her thoughtfulness and perspective is how she frequently considers the fact that giftedness is under-acknowledged (in part due to an associated perception of elitism) and under-addressed (in part because “retardation, like psychopathology, has been seen as a problem in need of a solution, while great strengths have been seen as privileges rather than problems”), and to the extent that solutions are offered by American public schools, they are insufficient because standards are so low to begin with and because they target only the moderately gifted, who are in least critical need. Winner expresses the potential usefulness of rigorous sets of criteria to help expose giftedness and allow it to thrive, but notes that “[a]n egalitarian, anti-elitist ideology has become dominant in our culture, even though our culture is in reality far from truly egalitarian,” a grim reminder of the self-perpetuating paradoxical circumstance that has only worsened in the 24 years since the book’s publication.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shashwat

    Gifted Children have long stirred fascination, envy, fear, and rejection amongst the common public. In this fascinating book, Ellen Winner uncovers 9 long-standing myths and shows us what gifted children are really like. Through vivid case studies and a century’s worth of research, Winner casts a light on the lives of the unusually gifted amongst us. These children aren’t ‘globally gifted’ as is usually assumed. Instead, their gifts are domain specific. Though some of them do exhibit some gifted Gifted Children have long stirred fascination, envy, fear, and rejection amongst the common public. In this fascinating book, Ellen Winner uncovers 9 long-standing myths and shows us what gifted children are really like. Through vivid case studies and a century’s worth of research, Winner casts a light on the lives of the unusually gifted amongst us. These children aren’t ‘globally gifted’ as is usually assumed. Instead, their gifts are domain specific. Though some of them do exhibit some giftedness across the board in academic domains, this is the exception rather than the rule. Those who are gifted in one area can be severely disadvantaged in another. Gifted children are defined by their precocity, divergence, and drive. Though many of them have IQs a few standard deviations above the norm, IQ is not the only factor that characterizes their gift. This logic is buttressed by the fact that many savants who have extremely low IQs are nevertheless able to perform at dazzling levels in their domain. Their gifts operate independent of their IQ levels. Undoubtedly, the families of the gifted children play a vital role in developing their gifts. But there is a real danger when some parents who want to live vicariously through their children’s gift end up destroying their gifts and burning them out. Gifted children are different from others and unless their passion for mastery and learning is shared by their peers, they become isolated and discouraged. Not all children are gifted, and schools must spend a part of their resources to help these gifted individuals get the stimulation and challenges they need. Simply accelerating them a few grades or putting them in enrichment classes does them little good. They tend to be introverted and have unnatural levels of focus that is unusual for most children their age. Many end up mastering their domains way before they even reach elementary school. But their giftedness does not guarantee them a bright future. Personality seems to play a major role in determining if these children will end up becoming eminent adults. A must read for psychologists and parents.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. from the library Gifted Children: Myths and Realities ISBN 0465017592 (ISBN13: 9780465017591) my thoughts from skimming through the pages, TOC, index, ref's and notes what a mix of good and her own mess While she admits that gifted children burn out there is no mention of why they burn out---as if that is just the way it is. well it isn't. They burn out from being abused mentally, psychologically, emotionally and all the other ways. IQ is not a fixed entity and she doesn't see that. Further gifted ch from the library Gifted Children: Myths and Realities ISBN 0465017592 (ISBN13: 9780465017591) my thoughts from skimming through the pages, TOC, index, ref's and notes what a mix of good and her own mess While she admits that gifted children burn out there is no mention of why they burn out---as if that is just the way it is. well it isn't. They burn out from being abused mentally, psychologically, emotionally and all the other ways. IQ is not a fixed entity and she doesn't see that. Further gifted children are, like any other aberration (see Andrew Solomon Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity, not wanted. Sometimes parents don't want them, maybe its the neighborhood, maybe its the school system philosophy, may its the family. In my case the school, the teachers and the students, didn't want me although the school counselors and the principals did. Gifted children can be born into dysfunctional families --dysfunctional being defined as the parents are so preoccupied with their own problems that the children take care of them. Or defined as parents are abusive. This will burn out a gifted child. Gifted adults burn out too. She makes no mention of Progoff's workAt a Journal WorkshopIra Progoff which came out of his work with gifted adults who were in need of therapy and couldn't get help from nongifted psychologists. She likewise is dismissive of the gifted cohort itself when she mentions nothing but a few negatives about the organization Mensa. This is an organization that has many fabulous programs and which fortunately tolerates a a considerable amount of nonconformity. This author is prone to accepting established authority, even though it is known to be biased against women, and minorities, and is more comfortable with conformity. I will be glad to change this assessment when I have read the book carefully but meanwhile readers should be cautious about what anyone claims about gifted children. Gifted children are often the focus of bullying in schools and schools do just about nothing about it. See the work of Rachel SimmonsRachel Simmons Among the many organizations that know what to do is AVP. See Sally Herzfeld's review Sally Herzfeld of AVP work.This We Can Do: Quaker Faith in Action Through the Alternatives to Violence Project. (AVP is not affiliated with any religion and is definitely not a Christian organization but has considerable support from Quakers.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    I took the book from the local library for a quick skimming. I found that the book has a great overview of what was currently known about gifted children as of 1996 (time the book is written). So, this is a good intro book for a parent of a gifted child. The most interesting and surprising findings for me were in chapters devoted to predictions of what happens to gifted children later in life. For example, in "Family Factors that Predict Later Creativity" I found that: * "The future creator seem t I took the book from the local library for a quick skimming. I found that the book has a great overview of what was currently known about gifted children as of 1996 (time the book is written). So, this is a good intro book for a parent of a gifted child. The most interesting and surprising findings for me were in chapters devoted to predictions of what happens to gifted children later in life. For example, in "Family Factors that Predict Later Creativity" I found that: * "The future creator seem to grow up in a family that is much less child-centered and supportive and far more stress-filled than does the gifted child not destined to become a creator". * "These creators came from atypical families - irritable and explosive, often prone to depression or to large-scale mood swings. The extreme stress in their early family life could include poverty, death of a parent, divorced or estranged parents, rejecting, abusive or alcoholic parents, fathers who experienced professional failure or bankruptcy etc. * Since the book is well-researched, the claim that the high level of stress and trauma is prevalent in the families of future creators can be supported by 10+ different studies mentioned in this book. fascinating stuff!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I read it just to inform a small part of the novel I'm writing, but I also ended up loving it. Really fascinating stuff, and of course I spent a good portion of the book self diagnosing and trying to gauge how gifted I was as a child. The writing was good--not overly technical or overly casual--and the case studies were interesting. I read it just to inform a small part of the novel I'm writing, but I also ended up loving it. Really fascinating stuff, and of course I spent a good portion of the book self diagnosing and trying to gauge how gifted I was as a child. The writing was good--not overly technical or overly casual--and the case studies were interesting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sealstitchery

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fernette

  13. 5 out of 5

    alan reads too much

  14. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gifted &

  16. 4 out of 5

    MNBooks

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tesh Ramey

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jill Fishgold

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Harrison

  20. 4 out of 5

    Seré Willis

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Beisner

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Corissa Nelson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liz Larocca

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mateja Zlo

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob Tebeau

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joe Zabek

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.