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DAW 30th Anniversary Fantasy

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To celebrate DAW Books's 30 years of publishing in the sf and fantasy genres, Wollheim and Gilbert have assembled these volumes that feature authors who have published under the DAW banner and whose works have made significant contributions to the field of imaginative literature. An essay by the editors (repeated in both volumes) relates the history of DAW and its founders To celebrate DAW Books's 30 years of publishing in the sf and fantasy genres, Wollheim and Gilbert have assembled these volumes that feature authors who have published under the DAW banner and whose works have made significant contributions to the field of imaginative literature. An essay by the editors (repeated in both volumes) relates the history of DAW and its founders, Donald and Elsie Wollheim, while individual author or editor commentaries introduce many of the stories. The fantasy collection includes a variety of stories, including Mercedes Lackey's expression of an author's worst nightmare ("After Midnight") and Christopher Stasheff's melancholy parable of a wizard's journey of bitter self-discovery ("Coronach of the Bell"). Contributions by other notable fantasy writers such as Tanith Lee, Melanie Rawn, and Lynn Abbey round out this collection of 18 tales. The sf anthology collects a stellar group of stories, including Brian Aldiss's cautionary tale of a space-faring warship whose passage results in the death of civilizations ("Aboard the Beatitude") and Tad Williams's wry recounting of the chat room at the end of the world ("Not with a Whimper, Either"). Stories by authors including Frederik Pohl, Timothy Zahn, and Kate Elliott are also among the 19 selections in this well-balanced volume. Together or separately, both books are recommended for most libraries.


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To celebrate DAW Books's 30 years of publishing in the sf and fantasy genres, Wollheim and Gilbert have assembled these volumes that feature authors who have published under the DAW banner and whose works have made significant contributions to the field of imaginative literature. An essay by the editors (repeated in both volumes) relates the history of DAW and its founders To celebrate DAW Books's 30 years of publishing in the sf and fantasy genres, Wollheim and Gilbert have assembled these volumes that feature authors who have published under the DAW banner and whose works have made significant contributions to the field of imaginative literature. An essay by the editors (repeated in both volumes) relates the history of DAW and its founders, Donald and Elsie Wollheim, while individual author or editor commentaries introduce many of the stories. The fantasy collection includes a variety of stories, including Mercedes Lackey's expression of an author's worst nightmare ("After Midnight") and Christopher Stasheff's melancholy parable of a wizard's journey of bitter self-discovery ("Coronach of the Bell"). Contributions by other notable fantasy writers such as Tanith Lee, Melanie Rawn, and Lynn Abbey round out this collection of 18 tales. The sf anthology collects a stellar group of stories, including Brian Aldiss's cautionary tale of a space-faring warship whose passage results in the death of civilizations ("Aboard the Beatitude") and Tad Williams's wry recounting of the chat room at the end of the world ("Not with a Whimper, Either"). Stories by authors including Frederik Pohl, Timothy Zahn, and Kate Elliott are also among the 19 selections in this well-balanced volume. Together or separately, both books are recommended for most libraries.

30 review for DAW 30th Anniversary Fantasy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aelvana

    If I still had the book in my possession, rather than having given it back to the library right after I finished it, I would provide very short summaries and opinions on each of the stories. As I don't, and can't possibly remember enough about each one offhand to try anyway, I'll go with more blanket statements. The anthology as a whole was a mixed bag. Most authors wrote stories to go along with whatever their main fantasy world was, and as a result their stories were incomprehensible or pointle If I still had the book in my possession, rather than having given it back to the library right after I finished it, I would provide very short summaries and opinions on each of the stories. As I don't, and can't possibly remember enough about each one offhand to try anyway, I'll go with more blanket statements. The anthology as a whole was a mixed bag. Most authors wrote stories to go along with whatever their main fantasy world was, and as a result their stories were incomprehensible or pointless. Mercedes Lackey is the worst offender of the lot with a blatant Mary Sue that assumes you know EVERY character she's ever written. The author's note attached made me similarly angry: the "Lackey-patented formula for success"? It's only what any writer worth his salt has been doing for millennia! On the other hand, there were a few pieces that did catch my interest, resulting in a very short list of new authors I need to check out. Those stories, unsurprisingly, properly introduced the worlds they displayed, didn't assume I already knew main character and sycophants, and proceeded to tell a whole story. Unfortunately, the gems were the least of the lot, and will probably be republished elsewhere. As a whole the anthology was a drag to read through, and while it might offer fans of the individual authors a little treat, it's hard for someone unfamiliar with the majority of the worlds to pick up. However, due to the few gems, I'll only rate it Neutral.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Wardhaugh

    It helps to have read a lot of DAW books before reading this. Lackey's story is particularly funny to fans of her books. In general this is a satisfying collection of stories. It helps to have read a lot of DAW books before reading this. Lackey's story is particularly funny to fans of her books. In general this is a satisfying collection of stories.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Palmatier

    Introduction by Betsy Wollheim and Sheila Gilbert: Normally I don’t find much of value in the introduction except perhaps the initial idea behind the anthology (which I then use to judge whether or not the authors stuck to that idea, deviated from it, or did something incredibly cool and unexpected with it). This time, though, the introduction actually gives you some incredibly interesting history on how DAW came to be and how it got to where it is right now, with Betsy and Sheila as editors. Pe Introduction by Betsy Wollheim and Sheila Gilbert: Normally I don’t find much of value in the introduction except perhaps the initial idea behind the anthology (which I then use to judge whether or not the authors stuck to that idea, deviated from it, or did something incredibly cool and unexpected with it). This time, though, the introduction actually gives you some incredibly interesting history on how DAW came to be and how it got to where it is right now, with Betsy and Sheila as editors. Perhaps this is more interesting to me than it would be to others, since I’m a DAW author myself, but I honestly think this introduction is as interesting, or more interesting, than some of the stories in the anthology (no offense to those authors). I’d definitely suggest reading it. Sow’s Ear—Silk Purse by Andre Norton: I got hooked on SF&F by reading Andre Norton, so I was really looking forward to reading this one. And I wasn’t disappointed. It’s a story about a young woman who is betrothed and wishes not to be married. To solve the problem, she pays a visit to the local witch . . . and asks to be made ugly. As you can expect, the story doesn’t end the way you might think. The Rebuke by Michael Shea: I have not read anything by Michael Shea, so I didn’t know what to expect. I like the story, about a sculptor in the last days of his life, who blames his master in the guild for his life’s failure as an artist. So he turns to his death to grant him one last chance to meet his master in the afterlife and give him his final rebuke. The world of the story is unique and cool . . . but I had a problem with the language of the story. I’m assuming this is a style choice by the author. It just didn’t read as smoothly as I would have liked. Persian Eyes by Tanith Lee: Ok, I’ve never read any of Tanith Lee’s books, which makes no sense to me because I’ve loved every short story of her’s that I’ve ever read. In this story, set in ancient Rome, a slave from Persis brings something strange and magical and dangerous into the household. Is it a curse, or a gift? I don’t think this story worked as well as some of Tanith’s other stories I’ve read, but I still liked it. Coronach of the Bell by Christopher Stasheff: I’ve never read anything by Christopher Stasheff either (don’t worry, I have read some of the authors in the anthology). They put the stories in order of when the author first began being published by DAW, so I think I didn’t get into the major reading/purchasing phase of my life until after these authors were published. In any case, this story was about a long-lived hermit/sorcerer who is first reviled and then, as time passes, revered by the members of his tribe. I didn’t get into this story at all. The beginning felt rough to me and needed some development and I’m not sure I got the point of the story in the end. But this could just be me. Ending and Beginning by Jennifer Roberson: Ooo! I liked this one. It wasn’t so much a short story as it was an introduction to some interesting characters though. It will definitely make you want to go read the Karavan series (of which 2 books are currently out). Once again, I haven’t read anything by Jennifer, although unlike some of the previous authors, I’ve actually bought a bunch of her books and simply haven’t had time to get around to them. After reading this, they’ve been bumped up on my “to be read” list though. This short story was about how a particular mysterious (and apparently magical) man becomes part of the karavan group. He comes to the attention (by dying) of a member already part of the group, a woman who is a true diviner—someone who can read the future in the palm of your hand. After Midnight by Mercedes Lackey: This little short story features a cast consisting of all of Mercedes Lackey’s characters from all of her books, who’ve come to visit her “after midnight” in order to . . . well, lodge a few complaints with the author. A fun read. And since I’ve read some (but not all) of Mercedes Lackey’s books, I actually knew most of the characters who arrived on scene. *grin* Nightfall’s Promise by Mickey Zucker Reichert: Wow, I liked this story. It wasn’t complicated or anything like that, but I liked the character and the writing. I haven’t read anything by Mickey Zucker Reichert before, but I’ve already got some of her books based on the strength of this story alone. It’s essentially a magical mystery, with the main character, Nightfall from some of her previous novels, attempting to find out who has been attacking children in the town and stealing their powers. We Two May Meet by Tanya Huff: This story was simply fun to read. I’ve only read Tanya’s Quarters novels before this, none of her sci-fi or humorous material, but now I’m curious about her humor as well. In this short, the most powerful sorcerer in the world wakes up to find herself sleeping next to . . . herself, literally. She spends the rest of the story trying to figure out how to piece herself back together again while attempting to find out who did this to her, all with fighting constantly with herself. The Sacrifice by Melanie Rawn: An interesting fantasy short that perhaps wasn’t quite fantasy. It deals with Joan of Arc and her death, or more precisely, a fictional Cardinal who speaks to her before her death. The fantasy element is a belief that blood spilled on French soil somehow sanctifies the current ruler of France . . . and the Cardinal is out to stop that from happening with Joan’s death. Heart-Healer by Deborah J. Ross: I liked this short story of a woman who can see the true nature of a human’s heart—whether it be boar, goat, or something more magical—and use that to help heal. However, I though the story needed a little more development. It felt like it was rushed in places. I haven’t read any of Deborah J. Ross’ “collaborations” with Marion Zimmer Bradley, but based on the writing here, I’ll like them. A Perfect Day in Valdemar by Larry Dixon: This story was good. I liked it from the halfway point on, although I thought it was a little drawn out at the beginning. A guardsman is wounded and is not expected to live unless there is some type of magical intervention . . . it’s just that the magical intervention comes from an unexpected source. I have the collaborations of Larry Dixon and Mercedes Lackey, but I haven’t gotten up to reading them in the Valdemar series yet. I’m still pretty far behind on this series. (But I blame coming into it late. I only read the Arrow books a few years ago.) Draconis Ex Machina by Irene Radford: This story is sort of a “fill in the backstory” of a character that appears in one of Irene’s series. It tells the story of how the prince is transformed into the shape of a wolf and is nearly killed before his role in the series later on can be fulfilled. I haven’t read the series that involved this character, so I’m certain some of its power was lost on me. An interesting story nonetheless. The Hamlet by Marjorie B. Kellogg: I read Marjorie B. Kellogg “Lear’s Daughter” when it came out as two books way back when, and immediately bought her Dragon Quartet from DAW when it came out, so it was interesting to see what she could do with a short story. And it’s a great short story, with an interesting group of characters and a little twist at the end that’s completely believable from both the character’s perspective (that he’d miss it) and the reader’s. One of my favorite stories in the anthology so far, it’s about a troupe of players whose magical lead character seems to have lost his or her charm. They take a much needed break, rather unwillingly, in a small seaside village and . . . well, you’ll have to read the rest. Moonlover and the Fountain of Blood by Jane Fancher: I’ve read Jane Fancher’s Ring series from DAW as well. This story is set in the same world but unlike Irene Radford’s story isn’t set up as part of the backstory of someone we already know or anything like that. It’s a story unto itself, with an interesting main character. This story deals with one character’s struggle to accept themselves as who they are and what it means to be in love. The Memory of Stone by Michelle West: I have this love/hate thing with Michelle West fiction. I love it, I keep reading it, but there are occasionally sections of the writing that either aren’t clear enough for me, or that are just obscure enough that I don’t quite follow them. Usually I just read through it and hope it makes more sense later on. That happened in this short story as well, but not as often as in her novels. I think the reason is that the books are so complex, with so many different threads happening at the same time, that I can’t keep them all straight with everything else that I’ve got going on (reading, writing, etc). In any case, this story ties in with the novels and tells us what happens with the Rod and Sword of the Kings and how they were reshaped. It delves into one of the main parts of Michelle’s novels that I’ve wanted to see more of, namely the Artisans and Makers and what they do. It was a great story and a great tie in with the rest of the novels in this world, as well as being its own short story that can be read alone. The Huntsman by Fiona Patton: I’ve not read Fiona Patton’s novels, although I’ve read a few of her short stories. This one is not set in any of her novel worlds, although it was certainly interesting and I can see some of the influences of her other worlds. It’s the story of two brothers and their powers and their attempts to save their town from attack from both land and sea. It involves gods and familiars and oracles and a magical labyrinth. I admit that there was some initial confusion on my part sorting out all of the names of the characters, the gods, the world, etc, but once I figured that out the story was interesting. I can see a novel written in this world, if Fiona decides that the story needs expansion. Linked, On the Lake of Souls by Kristen Britain: This was kind of a light, fun story about two women—a priest and the warrior set to guard her—who get into a small bit of trouble when they’re captured by an evil sorcerer, chained together, and set out to drift over a waterfall in a boat above a lake filled with living dead people. Or something like that. *grin* The two main characters were interesting and, as I said, the story was fun. It’s About Squirrels by Lynn Abbey: And the final story in the anthology was also fun, about a woman who seems to have a haunted, defunct hard drive . . . and the squirrels that are desperately trying to get it. I’m not quite sure the final explanation for everything was carried off as well as it could have been, but that doesn’t matter. It’s a light-hearted story that’s meant to make you chuckle at some of its absurdities. A nice way to end the anthology, even though the stories were organized according to when the authors were first published by DAW.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Andreeva

    "След полунощ" и "Кървавият фонтан“ са единствените в сборника, които смятам за читави, но това не е достатъчно да повдигне звездичките. Чудя се как се издържа "DAW" с авторите, които издава... за тези в сборника говоря, разбира се. Може би романите им са по-добри от разказите. Друго обяснение нямам. Сериозно... разочарование беше този сборник. Толкова клишета, евтина драма и какво ли не друго липсващо. "След полунощ" и "Кървавият фонтан“ са единствените в сборника, които смятам за читави, но това не е достатъчно да повдигне звездичките. Чудя се как се издържа "DAW" с авторите, които издава... за тези в сборника говоря, разбира се. Може би романите им са по-добри от разказите. Друго обяснение нямам. Сериозно... разочарование беше този сборник. Толкова клишета, евтина драма и какво ли не друго липсващо.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Fantastic variety. Some I thoroughly enjoyed, while some were forgettable. None were bad. I am not usually one for short stories and I was skeptical that a decent fantasy story could be told with robust characters and plot in the format of a short story, but most of these authors succeeded admirably! I bought the sci-fi version. Let you know how it goes!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cloudwalker

    This was a fun book. Not only was it a fairly nice mix of stories, but the editorial notes were extremely interesting as well. In fact, some of the notes were better reading than the stories they accompanied (which may or may not be a good thing, come to think of it. What author wants to be outshone by his or her editor? *shrugs* Well, it didn't happen often.) Anyway, I found myself wondering if thirty years hence, the tales would seem as dated as the ones in The Science Fiction Hall of Fame (pu This was a fun book. Not only was it a fairly nice mix of stories, but the editorial notes were extremely interesting as well. In fact, some of the notes were better reading than the stories they accompanied (which may or may not be a good thing, come to think of it. What author wants to be outshone by his or her editor? *shrugs* Well, it didn't happen often.) Anyway, I found myself wondering if thirty years hence, the tales would seem as dated as the ones in The Science Fiction Hall of Fame (published in 1970) now do. In those stories, almost everyone was male and action-oriented, and if I recall correctly, the only powerful female in the book was an alien, and an old cranky one at that. The characters in this book ranged widely in age, and females were well represented. I'm sure there's something wildly stereotypical that I'm culturally blinded to, though. Yeah, there's lots of witches and mages and warriors (male and female) but you'd expect that in a fantasy anthology. After all, that's the territory. Still, there were a couple of stories that I particularly liked, and both involved creativity. The first is "After Midnight," which is an amusing bit about an author having to deal with her unhappy characters, and trying to explain why exactly she does what she does to them. To people who have never attempted to write fiction that may sound ridiculous, but the pathetic truth is that those of us who do attempt writing (regardless of why or how well) will indeed have run-ins with the characters renting space in our heads. It may be an imaginary disagreement, but trying to force one to do A when it really wants to do B will ruin the story...seriously! *chuckles* The second ("The Memory of Stone") involves the drive to create, and it beautifully captures how deeply visceral that need can be. While none of us can genuinely work magic, anyone who has gotten so absorbed in the making of something that they forget everything else but what they are doing can relate to the artists in this poetic tale. It's a lovely piece of writing, and worth the price of the book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erinina Marie

    30th Anniversary DAW Fantasy Anthology ed. by Elizabeth R. Wollheim and Sheila F. Gilbert I obtained an uncorrected proof of this book from some book exchange or other at SLC, and am finally getting around to reading it. It’s great how a goal of reading 100 books can tend to dust off the covers of things that I’ve been putting off for years. This particular book is a great introduction to the world of Fantasy literature, I feel. I was introducted to writers such as Christopher Stasheff, Jennifer 30th Anniversary DAW Fantasy Anthology ed. by Elizabeth R. Wollheim and Sheila F. Gilbert I obtained an uncorrected proof of this book from some book exchange or other at SLC, and am finally getting around to reading it. It’s great how a goal of reading 100 books can tend to dust off the covers of things that I’ve been putting off for years. This particular book is a great introduction to the world of Fantasy literature, I feel. I was introducted to writers such as Christopher Stasheff, Jennifer Robeson, Mercedes Lackey, Mickey Zucker Reichert, Deborah J. Ross, and Michelle West. These were my favorite writers, most effectively drawing me into their stories, not allowing me to put the book down, still most of the stories were page turners enough to make me look forward to reading my bedtime fantasy before dreaming of my own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Margit

    There were three stories I particularly liked for no better reason than they suited the mood I was in when I was reading them. They are by no means the only good ones in the book, but they were the ones I felt a resonance with. Ending and Beginning, by Jennifer Roberson, is set in her new world about which she is currently penning her first novel. I also enjoyed A Perfect Day in Valdemar by Larry Dixon. In and of itself the story was excellent, but even if it hadn't been, this is one of those st There were three stories I particularly liked for no better reason than they suited the mood I was in when I was reading them. They are by no means the only good ones in the book, but they were the ones I felt a resonance with. Ending and Beginning, by Jennifer Roberson, is set in her new world about which she is currently penning her first novel. I also enjoyed A Perfect Day in Valdemar by Larry Dixon. In and of itself the story was excellent, but even if it hadn't been, this is one of those stories where the end would justify the means. And lastly, I enjoyed Lynn Abbey's It's About Squirrels . . .. It's an urban fantasy involving Florida, pallbearer squirrels, and a crashed hard drive. What more could you want in a story?

  9. 5 out of 5

    K H

    The Negatives -I need to stop reading short stories. Perhaps they're just not for me. I just can't relate to a character I know is going to disappear forever in fifteen pages. -Several stories were apart of the authors' epic fantasy series which is both confusing and frustrating for new readers The Positives -Maybe I'll enjoy it more in a few years when I've become more aquatinted with these authors works and writing styles. The Negatives -I need to stop reading short stories. Perhaps they're just not for me. I just can't relate to a character I know is going to disappear forever in fifteen pages. -Several stories were apart of the authors' epic fantasy series which is both confusing and frustrating for new readers The Positives -Maybe I'll enjoy it more in a few years when I've become more aquatinted with these authors works and writing styles.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Schnaucl

    This anthology consists of fantasy stories by several prominent DAW authors. Some of the authors contributed stories set in an established world but others contributed something completely new. I thought this was a pretty good anthology. It took me a while to get back into reading pure fantasy (as opposed to urban fantasy). I'd read or heard of the majority of authors in the anthology but I also found some new authors I'd like to try out. This anthology consists of fantasy stories by several prominent DAW authors. Some of the authors contributed stories set in an established world but others contributed something completely new. I thought this was a pretty good anthology. It took me a while to get back into reading pure fantasy (as opposed to urban fantasy). I'd read or heard of the majority of authors in the anthology but I also found some new authors I'd like to try out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I absolutely adore Mercedes Lackey's story in this anthology. I will pull the book off the shelf just to read this story when I need a pick-me-up. It is a bit of a spoiler if you haven't read all of Mercedes Lackey's books, but for a fan, it's like strawberries dipped in dark chocolate. I absolutely adore Mercedes Lackey's story in this anthology. I will pull the book off the shelf just to read this story when I need a pick-me-up. It is a bit of a spoiler if you haven't read all of Mercedes Lackey's books, but for a fan, it's like strawberries dipped in dark chocolate.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda A.

    The stories by Mercedes Lackey and Larry Dixon are particularly excellent. Larry's reminded me that I need to buy stock in Kleenex before reading their works. The stories by Mercedes Lackey and Larry Dixon are particularly excellent. Larry's reminded me that I need to buy stock in Kleenex before reading their works.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Quite A few good short stories in this anthology.

  14. 5 out of 5

    ZigZagSuck

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rob Hilton

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kent

  21. 4 out of 5

    JoyfulK

  22. 5 out of 5

    Starfiresky

  23. 5 out of 5

    Czudno

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gillian Bass

  25. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Addy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Peters

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jane Mason

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

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