Hot Best Seller

Elsie's Motherhood

Availability: Ready to download

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most impor This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


Compare

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most impor This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

30 review for Elsie's Motherhood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kellyn Roth

    More focused on Elsie's children than Elsie at this point, it's still a pretty good book. At some point I'm going to come through and reread all these and write actual reviews and give actual ratings, but for now, I'll just say that it was good. :) More focused on Elsie's children than Elsie at this point, it's still a pretty good book. At some point I'm going to come through and reread all these and write actual reviews and give actual ratings, but for now, I'll just say that it was good. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Therese

    I just can't finish this, about halfway through the book I lost interest. I don't know why, it wasn't bad, it's just that I can't connect with the characters. They are role models, but I can't connect or relate to any of them. :( I just can't finish this, about halfway through the book I lost interest. I don't know why, it wasn't bad, it's just that I can't connect with the characters. They are role models, but I can't connect or relate to any of them. :(

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tara Lynn

    Sometimes I wonder while reading these, if their author was living in a perpetual rainbow bubble. While I can imagine that a rosy picture of Southern Reconstruction was painted for Northern abolitionists and philanthropists after the Civil War, there was still an overflow of information that came back from the impoverished South. While Finley's picture of Southern reconstruction is oddly rosy and explainable, she completely glosses over the fact that there is no way Elsie and her family's everda Sometimes I wonder while reading these, if their author was living in a perpetual rainbow bubble. While I can imagine that a rosy picture of Southern Reconstruction was painted for Northern abolitionists and philanthropists after the Civil War, there was still an overflow of information that came back from the impoverished South. While Finley's picture of Southern reconstruction is oddly rosy and explainable, she completely glosses over the fact that there is no way Elsie and her family's everday lives could have been so remarkably unmarred by the experience of their destitute and desperate neighbors. While Aunt Enna is often painted as the shrew of the family, I found myself often agreeing with many of her points. Although delivered in a cutting tone, so many of her concerns are vaild. Elsie's alleged family bubble would never have been able to exist the way it's portrayed in ruined Virgina, arguably one of the hardest hit areas of the South. Southern Reconstruction, speculation, economic straits, cheating, and price fluctuation made normal living close to impossible. As portrayed by accounts of people in Georgia, Lousiana, and other states, many of the people who came back to the South after the war was over NEVER would have lived in the exact same manner as their pre-war days, if only out of respect for their neighbors, who lived out the end of the war in fear and starvation. Genteel poverty was an accepted way of life, and rigidly enforced, even by those who might have had the money to spend on better things. At the time, the only people who would have lived in such relative comfort were carpetbaggers and scalawags, who often profited from fixing prices and taxes. Again, a cute story, but I would almost call it a fairy tale of improbability.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    ELSIE'S MOTHERHOOD is #5 in the Elsie Dinsmore series. It's set in 1867-1868, the Reconstruction Era of the South. Elsie and her husband set out to educate the freed slaves, but the local Ku Klux Klan doesn't like that and burns down the schoolhouse. Nothing deterred, Mr. Travilla has the entire structure rebuilt. In retaliation the KKK then make another midnight attack, this time upon Elsie's very home! Exciting stuff. Elsie emerges as a true heroine here in her championship of the blacks. She ELSIE'S MOTHERHOOD is #5 in the Elsie Dinsmore series. It's set in 1867-1868, the Reconstruction Era of the South. Elsie and her husband set out to educate the freed slaves, but the local Ku Klux Klan doesn't like that and burns down the schoolhouse. Nothing deterred, Mr. Travilla has the entire structure rebuilt. In retaliation the KKK then make another midnight attack, this time upon Elsie's very home! Exciting stuff. Elsie emerges as a true heroine here in her championship of the blacks. She is now the mother of five children and hasn't gained an ounce of weight since her wedding, ten years ago! Author Martha Finley juxtaposes such fantasy elements with pseudo-historical reality. The children---young Elsie, Edward, Violet, Harold and Herbert---are all sweet little tykes, almost too good to be true. The only exception is Edward ("Eddie"), who has a certain amount of arrogance inherited from his grandfather, Horace Dinsmore. In one memorable scene Eddie plays with a loaded gun, against parental orders, and accidentally shoots his own father (though not fatally). He's Horace Dinsmore in rompers. Elsie's aunts, Enna and Louise, also return as evil figures. They hate Elsie for being lovelier and more affluent than themselves. Martha Finley believed in Divine Retribution here on earth as well as in the afterlife, so Enna and Louise must suffer for their sins. They are on a downward spiral now, while conversely Elsie is on the upswing. In subsequent books, the reader will see exactly how relentlessly yet justly the Good Lord intends to punish Enna and Louise...!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This series is a bit Calvinistic in its theology, and it's also a bit uber-Christian; i.e., the Christians are really, really good and the non-Christians are really, really bad. This series is a bit Calvinistic in its theology, and it's also a bit uber-Christian; i.e., the Christians are really, really good and the non-Christians are really, really bad.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Faith Burnside

    This is among the more harmless of the Elsie books, but it leaves impossible standards of motherhood, childhood, humanhood, etc.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katja Labonté

    5 stars & 5/10 hearts. I love each of these books so very much. At first blush the children seem a little too good, but then they do act up a little, and you love them enough that they don’t bug you. I love Elsie so much & she is such an inspiration & a blessing. I truly believe that in Jesus one can be that good. Edward is an amazing father, & Mr. Dinsmore has really improved. ;) The Klu Klux Klan added a strong element of excitement & I loved the message of trusting fully in the Lord. And I re 5 stars & 5/10 hearts. I love each of these books so very much. At first blush the children seem a little too good, but then they do act up a little, and you love them enough that they don’t bug you. I love Elsie so much & she is such an inspiration & a blessing. I truly believe that in Jesus one can be that good. Edward is an amazing father, & Mr. Dinsmore has really improved. ;) The Klu Klux Klan added a strong element of excitement & I loved the message of trusting fully in the Lord. And I really love Calhoun. ;) And why does every book make me tear up?? A Favourite Quote: “‘Be calm, dearest, and put your trust in the Lord,’ the mother said, folding the trembling, sobbing child to her breast. ‘“The beloved of the Lord shall dwell in safety by him, and the Lord shall cover him all the day long.” “Not an hair of your head shall fall to the ground without your Father.”’” “‘Yes, sweet words,’ said Mr. Travilla; ‘and remember what the Lord Jesus said to Pilate, “Thou couldst have no power at all against me, except it were given thee from above.”’” A Favourite Humorous Quote: “...creeping closer to his father whispered, ‘Papa, I'm tired, and I want to ask you something. Do you think the fish will hear if I speak low?’ “‘Perhaps not; you may try it if you like,’ returned Mr. Travilla, looking somewhat amused.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily Bell

    I grew up reading Martha Finley's stories about Elsie and loved them as a child. Re-reading them in adulthood, I can't help but struggle with the moral perfection of Elsie, Travilla, and the majority of her children. They live a picturesque life in a setting that realistically would have been destroyed by the Civil War. The relationship Elsie has with the black people in these stories is too motherly and patronizing for my taste. I still love Elsie Dinsmore and all of the characters, but I see m I grew up reading Martha Finley's stories about Elsie and loved them as a child. Re-reading them in adulthood, I can't help but struggle with the moral perfection of Elsie, Travilla, and the majority of her children. They live a picturesque life in a setting that realistically would have been destroyed by the Civil War. The relationship Elsie has with the black people in these stories is too motherly and patronizing for my taste. I still love Elsie Dinsmore and all of the characters, but I see much more Mary Sue-ism than I did when I was a little girl.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gracie

    I think it was one of the most wonderful books I ever read. They have a scriptural base, as to how she raised her family in a Godly way. I'm not good at reviews, but I must say this book is exceptionally good. All her books are very wonderful. It makes you rethink how we raise our own children to revere scripture. I think it was one of the most wonderful books I ever read. They have a scriptural base, as to how she raised her family in a Godly way. I'm not good at reviews, but I must say this book is exceptionally good. All her books are very wonderful. It makes you rethink how we raise our own children to revere scripture.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shari Klase

    An old fashioned feast I feel like I've been nourished when I read these Elsie Dinsmore books. This one was very exciting as it introduced the Ku Klux Klan into the narrative. Another wonderful story by Martha Findlay. An old fashioned feast I feel like I've been nourished when I read these Elsie Dinsmore books. This one was very exciting as it introduced the Ku Klux Klan into the narrative. Another wonderful story by Martha Findlay.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    Good for the lolz.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brenna

    This is the best book of the Elsie Dinsmore series. I love learning about this time in history!I especially like learning about the Klu Klux Klan and the civil war.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    It was good, but I got bored in the middle so I basically just skimmed the rest.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    I think all the Elsie books are amazing!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth Gimenez

    I just finished reading this one. It was reeally good. I like learning about the group in the book but it is sad what they did to "negroes" in those days, and how they burned down the black schools. I just finished reading this one. It was reeally good. I like learning about the group in the book but it is sad what they did to "negroes" in those days, and how they burned down the black schools.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole G.

    Sunshine and lollipops and rainbows everywhere! Yes, even during Reconstruction! Lots of KKK action, but Elsie's family is never harmed because they love Jesus. *yawn* Sunshine and lollipops and rainbows everywhere! Yes, even during Reconstruction! Lots of KKK action, but Elsie's family is never harmed because they love Jesus. *yawn*

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

  19. 5 out of 5

    Briana

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elsie Stoltzfus

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kay

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tacey Raye

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

  26. 5 out of 5

    S.C

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maddie McLain

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tee

  30. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.