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Shakespeare vs. Lovecraft: A Horror Comedy Mash-Up featuring Shakespeare's Characters and Lovecraft's Creatures

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“We are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep.” William Shakespeare “In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.” Howard Phillips Lovecraft. In the same putrid vein as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Shakespeare v. Lovecraft slithers hideously onto the literary mash-up scene, whispering of cosmic horrors and eldritch tales whi “We are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep.” William Shakespeare “In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.” Howard Phillips Lovecraft. In the same putrid vein as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Shakespeare v. Lovecraft slithers hideously onto the literary mash-up scene, whispering of cosmic horrors and eldritch tales whilst espousing sweet soliloquys and profoundly contemplating mankind’s place in the universe. Prospero, driven dangerously insane by prolonged exposure to the dread Necronomicon, makes a terrible pact with the titanic alien beast known only as Cthulhu. Now only his enchantress daughter Miranda and a handful of history’s greatest heroes are all that stand between humanity and blasphemous eternal subjugation. It’s a bloodbath of Shakespearean proportions as Cthulhu and his eldritch companions come at our protagonists from all manner of strange geometric angles in a hideous and savage battle for supremacy. This horror-comedy novella of 36,000 words will seize you in its clammy grip and not release you until you have gone positively mad with delight! Witness all this and more: Histrionic Heroes vs. Tentacled Terrors!!! Endless Soliloquys vs. Unnatural Silences!!! Romeo vs. Mi-Go!!! England’s Royal Beasts vs. A Shoggoth!!! The Author vs. Iambic Pentameter!!!


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“We are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep.” William Shakespeare “In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.” Howard Phillips Lovecraft. In the same putrid vein as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Shakespeare v. Lovecraft slithers hideously onto the literary mash-up scene, whispering of cosmic horrors and eldritch tales whi “We are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep.” William Shakespeare “In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.” Howard Phillips Lovecraft. In the same putrid vein as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Shakespeare v. Lovecraft slithers hideously onto the literary mash-up scene, whispering of cosmic horrors and eldritch tales whilst espousing sweet soliloquys and profoundly contemplating mankind’s place in the universe. Prospero, driven dangerously insane by prolonged exposure to the dread Necronomicon, makes a terrible pact with the titanic alien beast known only as Cthulhu. Now only his enchantress daughter Miranda and a handful of history’s greatest heroes are all that stand between humanity and blasphemous eternal subjugation. It’s a bloodbath of Shakespearean proportions as Cthulhu and his eldritch companions come at our protagonists from all manner of strange geometric angles in a hideous and savage battle for supremacy. This horror-comedy novella of 36,000 words will seize you in its clammy grip and not release you until you have gone positively mad with delight! Witness all this and more: Histrionic Heroes vs. Tentacled Terrors!!! Endless Soliloquys vs. Unnatural Silences!!! Romeo vs. Mi-Go!!! England’s Royal Beasts vs. A Shoggoth!!! The Author vs. Iambic Pentameter!!!

30 review for Shakespeare vs. Lovecraft: A Horror Comedy Mash-Up featuring Shakespeare's Characters and Lovecraft's Creatures

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jillyn

    I received this book through Goodreads First Reads. Shakespeare v Lovecraft is a novella that follows the classical Shakespearean character Prospero (The Tempest) as he makes a seedy deal with the one and only Cthulhu. Prospero's daughter Miranda, as well as other heroes from Shakespeare plays such as Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth must make things right in the universe once more, and try their damnedest to save the day. --- I have no shame in saying that I have nerdy interests. I could sit I received this book through Goodreads First Reads. Shakespeare v Lovecraft is a novella that follows the classical Shakespearean character Prospero (The Tempest) as he makes a seedy deal with the one and only Cthulhu. Prospero's daughter Miranda, as well as other heroes from Shakespeare plays such as Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth must make things right in the universe once more, and try their damnedest to save the day. --- I have no shame in saying that I have nerdy interests. I could sit and read Shakespeare for hours. Contrarily, I have begun a recent obsession with science fiction, thanks to a not so gentle push from my girlfriend, who also loves it. All that being said, this novella is a perfect blend of my interests, offering a new twist on two classic authors. +The cover alone is enough to draw you in. It features a Shakespearean gent and two Shakespearean ladies, one of which with one of Cthulhu's tentacles wrapped around her leg. The cover alone features a magic circle, Cthulhu, and pretty women. If that doesn't make you want to read it, well, I don't know what would. +I feel that the works of both William Shakespeare and H.P. Lovecraft were blended well. The language was that of the Bard, while the beasties are fresh out of Lovecraft science fiction. Despite the major contrast in both time frame and writing style, and not to mention genre, this blend seemed seamless. +Going based off the Bard once more, the violent scenes did him proud. There was a definite horror/gore element to this story that I was pleasantly surprised with. +Then too, there was definite comedic aspects. Because.... It's Cthulhu. And Shakespeare. +In case you didn't hear me, Cthulhu is in this book. That gets a plus mark all to itself. -I'm not exactly sure what it is, but something is keeping me from giving this a perfect 5 star review. If I can actually pin point what it is, I will edit this review and slip it in. I recommend it to fans of Shakespeare or science fiction, or ideally both. It's a quick, enjoyable read. Thank you to Goodreads and D.R. O'Brien for the lovely signed copy. This review can also be found on my shiny new blog, Bitches n Prose.

  2. 4 out of 5

    MJ

    I’ve been very skeptical and wary of mash-up books since reading Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, which I didn’t enjoy very much. However, I found myself pleasantly surprised by Shakespeare v Lovecraft which drew me in not just because of my love for Lovecraft, but also that cover! I know you’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover, but just look at it! Who wouldn’t just pick this book up and say, “Yup, I think so!” Moving on. It was definitely a different story than what I was really expect I’ve been very skeptical and wary of mash-up books since reading Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, which I didn’t enjoy very much. However, I found myself pleasantly surprised by Shakespeare v Lovecraft which drew me in not just because of my love for Lovecraft, but also that cover! I know you’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover, but just look at it! Who wouldn’t just pick this book up and say, “Yup, I think so!” Moving on. It was definitely a different story than what I was really expecting. Many mash-ups, or crossovers, or even re-writes are simply a story (whether original in its own right or now) that simply has familiar names in it. Although I do admit that, at its very base and simplest, that is what this book is, I found myself not minding as much as I might have because I was actually enjoying the story. It was also shorter then I had expected. At 36,000 words it was the work of only a night to get through it all. But it left me wanting more, which was a good thing! I found myself thinking of the story long after I had put it down and really wishing the author had more works I could read! D.R. O’Brian is absolutely an author I will continue to look forward to reading more of his work, when/if anything ever comes out. But, moving on again, I really liked the comedy of the book, and I loved that it was horror-comedy. I truly, honestly think that is difficult to write, but more difficult to write well. The blending of the two styles, Shakespeare and Lovecraft, was perfectly done. The heroes (and some of the villains) are from Shakespeare, while the beasties and monsters are of the very sci-fi, very Lovecraft persuasion. But even so, they were placed together well and, even being fiction, were very believable. I haven’t read as much Shakespeare as I probably should but it’s mostly because I don’t like tragedy stories. Once everyone starts to die, especially when everyone starts to die in sad…er, tragic ways, I’ve always found myself to be a bit of a coward and wanting to put the book down and kept everyone alive in my mind. This, however, did not keep me from enjoying this book. Even if I didn’t know who any of these characters were, I think I would still have wanted to read this, and I think I would still have understood it. Foreknowledge of these characters isn’t necessary, as their personalities are, for the most part, very apparent and why they do things is well explained. Or, even when it’s not, it isn’t confusing. Again, it was very well written. All in all, I give the book 4.5 out of 5 stars, and I really hope to see more form this author in the future. I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This review can also be seen on The Forbidden Library

  3. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This review and others on my blog. It sounded silly and fun, and I wanted to read something silly and fun. Review copy provided for free through Netgalley. It works as well as any of these literary mashups do, I suppose. Don’t go in expecting literary brilliance and you’ll have a good time. I certainly did. I’m not sure there’s much point critiquing this in terms of the writing. It’s not what it’s going to be read for after all, though the writing itself is pretty good. A bit over the top at times, This review and others on my blog. It sounded silly and fun, and I wanted to read something silly and fun. Review copy provided for free through Netgalley. It works as well as any of these literary mashups do, I suppose. Don’t go in expecting literary brilliance and you’ll have a good time. I certainly did. I’m not sure there’s much point critiquing this in terms of the writing. It’s not what it’s going to be read for after all, though the writing itself is pretty good. A bit over the top at times, but that suits the conceit admirably. Unlike most literary mashups the plot itself is farily original. The blurb references Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but whereas P&P&Z was just Jane Austens original work with Zombies and Ninjas added to the narrative (while I like the book I am not sure they improved her original cutting social satire) this takes characters in the public realm and creates a whole new plot with them. Yes, that makes it essentially fan fiction, but Lovecraft encouraged that sort of thing and Shakespeare’s been dead for centuries so I doubt he cares. I think I like it more for doing that, to be honest. But it can be a tricky thing, working with other peoples charactes, especially ones that have been around so long and worked their ways into so many hearts. There were points where I didn’t think the characters were acting like ‘them’. You wouldn’t necessarily need an encyclopaedic knowledge of Shakespeare OR Lovecraft to enjoy this just for the ride it is, as it is a solidly constructed plot that doesn;t rely over much on the readers pre-existing knowledge. However, you will get a lot more out of the book if you do have a greater-than-basic awareness of both. In short, fun and works surprisingly well. A good, solid 4 stars. (second in a row. I must be going soft)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erleen Alvarez

    You can read more reviews at Books For YA! From the very first time I saw the cover of Shakespeare vs Lovecraft, I was immediately intrigue by the book. The quirkiness of the cover was so eye catching and after I read the synopsis I thought, Shakespeare's character meets Lovecraft's monsters? Hmmm, that sounds interesting. Fortunately, Mr. O'brien gave me the opportunity to read his book. And boy, it was a riot! This is the first time I read a mash-up and I totally loved it! I'm a bit of a fan of You can read more reviews at Books For YA! From the very first time I saw the cover of Shakespeare vs Lovecraft, I was immediately intrigue by the book. The quirkiness of the cover was so eye catching and after I read the synopsis I thought, Shakespeare's character meets Lovecraft's monsters? Hmmm, that sounds interesting. Fortunately, Mr. O'brien gave me the opportunity to read his book. And boy, it was a riot! This is the first time I read a mash-up and I totally loved it! I'm a bit of a fan of Shakespeare's play since high school so I know most of his famous character. It is so refreshing to see Romeo, Miranda and King and Queen Macbeth in just one book, fighting side by side to defeat the the atrocious monsters of Lovecraft. This book is not a clash of Shakespeare's and Lovecraft's works, it's the fusion of their works. O'brien flawlessly merged this two different literary world and created a funny and horrendous adventure of cosmic proportion. I think everyone would enjoy this book even if they don't know anything about Shakespeare or Lovecraft's work. It's definitely an enjoyable and entertaining read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mounika Lakkakula

    I received this book through Goodreads First Reads.Iam really very happy with this.Thank u good reads. The book's really awesome.The cover of the book itself forces us to read the novel.Such a wonderful cover it is.I really loved reading this book.The blend of shakespeare and lovecroft's novels is well set and it really is great.Ctulhu is major plus point for this book.This novel has both the elements i love like horror and comedy..The book is very easy to read,interesting and very much enjoyabl I received this book through Goodreads First Reads.Iam really very happy with this.Thank u good reads. The book's really awesome.The cover of the book itself forces us to read the novel.Such a wonderful cover it is.I really loved reading this book.The blend of shakespeare and lovecroft's novels is well set and it really is great.Ctulhu is major plus point for this book.This novel has both the elements i love like horror and comedy..The book is very easy to read,interesting and very much enjoyable for all the bookworms.Thanks to Goodreads and D.R.O'Brien for giving me this wonderful opportunity of receiving this book.With this I end my review which I suppose is a good and helpful one.Thanks a lot

  6. 4 out of 5

    Majanka

    Book Review originally published here: http://www.iheartreading.net/mini-rev... Great premise, to combine Lovecraft’s characters and Shakespeare characters. Unfortunately the plot falls short. The first chapter is riddled with adjectives that have little purpose being there. Characters lacked depth and personality, and I didn’t much care for them. A ‘meh’ read. Book Review originally published here: http://www.iheartreading.net/mini-rev... Great premise, to combine Lovecraft’s characters and Shakespeare characters. Unfortunately the plot falls short. The first chapter is riddled with adjectives that have little purpose being there. Characters lacked depth and personality, and I didn’t much care for them. A ‘meh’ read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ευαγγελία

    I must admit i'm not a fun of Lovrcraft. There were scenes in this book that shocked me... but i find it very interesting. It is written exactly like Shakespeare's work but it describes bloody scenes with so many details... i'm sure both funs of Shakespear and Lovecraft are going to love it! I must admit i'm not a fun of Lovrcraft. There were scenes in this book that shocked me... but i find it very interesting. It is written exactly like Shakespeare's work but it describes bloody scenes with so many details... i'm sure both funs of Shakespear and Lovecraft are going to love it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeanna Olson

    Sounds promising and it's a good day, a crazy hot and overcast Sunday, to dig into this Amazon sample. I love Amazon samples. Sounds promising and it's a good day, a crazy hot and overcast Sunday, to dig into this Amazon sample. I love Amazon samples.

  9. 4 out of 5

    /Fitbrah/

    I dunno what I expected.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Is there anyone who hasn’t at one time or another used one of William Shakespeare’s many well-known quotes to fit some situation he finds himself in? DR O’Brien’s novel, which he graciously shares co-authorship with the Bard of Avon and the Bard of Providence, goes two steps further, weaving a tale with creatures and characters created by these two using dialogue from both. Sometimes it’s paraphrased a bit to fit the situation but all in all, it suits well, and one can only think of the time and Is there anyone who hasn’t at one time or another used one of William Shakespeare’s many well-known quotes to fit some situation he finds himself in? DR O’Brien’s novel, which he graciously shares co-authorship with the Bard of Avon and the Bard of Providence, goes two steps further, weaving a tale with creatures and characters created by these two using dialogue from both. Sometimes it’s paraphrased a bit to fit the situation but all in all, it suits well, and one can only think of the time and effort involved in finding just the proper phrasing. The story involves Prospero, of The Tempest fame and his daughter Miranda, the girl who saw that “Brave New World.” In his desire for revenge against his brother for exiling him, Prospero has joined forces with the mighty Cthulu and the Great Old Ones via the machinations of their disciple Caliban. Miranda opposes Prospero, begging him to give up both his loyalty to these ancient gods as well as his vengeance. She gets disowned for her trouble, and cast out of the island. When Prospero takes his battle from his little island into Europe itself, Miranda finds her own allies in the fight. She joins forces with a teenage heartthrob named Romeo Montague, and enlists those monarchs of Scotland, Lord and Lady MacBeth in fighting not only her father but also the Undead Richard III, who seeks the Ancient Gods’ favors after King Henry IV is killed fighting them. Other characters join in the fight, rounding out the roll-call on both sides, but there’s not enough time or space here to list them. Suffice it to say they’re all recognizable to the Shakespeare buff or Lovecraft fan. What ensues is a mighty battle, featuring all the Great Old Ones—from Yog-Sothoth to the Goat with a Thousand Young—some of it taking places in the ancient and hidden city of R’lyeh itself. It’s a rousing fight and an exciting one, revealing just how much the author knows about both his co-writers. Shakespearean scholars as well as Lovecraftian ones should enjoy this rendering. The ending, to borrow another often-used phrase, is a “comsummation devoutly to be wished.” Shakespeare v Lovecraft is available from Obiedan Publications. This novel was supplied by the publisher and no remuneration was involved in the writing of this review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yzabel Ginsberg

    (I received an e-copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.) 2.5 stars. I liked some parts better than others. Overall, this book was a quick and nice read that made me smile, although I can't say it made me actually laugh. I appreciated the numerous winks to and quotes to Shakespeare, of course. The latter may be both a strength and a weakness: just knowing a couple of lines from the Bard isn't enough to get them, since they cross-reference several plays (The Tempest fi (I received an e-copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.) 2.5 stars. I liked some parts better than others. Overall, this book was a quick and nice read that made me smile, although I can't say it made me actually laugh. I appreciated the numerous winks to and quotes to Shakespeare, of course. The latter may be both a strength and a weakness: just knowing a couple of lines from the Bard isn't enough to get them, since they cross-reference several plays (The Tempest first, but also Macbeth, Hamlet, King Lear, Henry V, Henry IV, A Midsummer's Night Dream... and others). If one knows these works well enough, the inserts are likely to look awesome (personnally, I loved Henry V's "Gods, stand up for mankind!", alluding to Edmund's soliloquy in King Lear); otherwise, they may fall flat. The same goes with Lovecraft—and I'm positive I missed a few things regarding those parts, since I haven't read his works in the past eight years or so. I suppose that such mash-ups don't appeal to people who don't like the original novels they're inspired from, so it's not that much of a problem; but it could be for readers who know only a little. The writing style attempts at emulating both Shakespeare's and HPL's. In my opinion, sometimes it manages, and sometimes it fails, making reading somewhat fastidious; I'm thinking about the heavy use of adverbs stacked almost one upon the other, among other things, which made a lot of sentences and paragraphs look weird. This is somewhat paradoxical, considering how short the book is (86 pages or so). Also, the narrative itself regularly seemed more of a pretext than a real story. Again, this may not be the aim of a mash-up (I admit I haven't read a lot of those, so perhaps I'm just a poor judge), but I still expected events to be stringed in a more streamlined way. As it is, I couldn't care about the characters like I would have for Shakespeare's, nor did I get the feeling of human life easily discarded as I would in Lovecraft's works. All in all, it wasn't a bad read, though. Only I was expecting more, and therefore ended up disappointed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Raymond

    Thanks to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, there has been no dearth of mashup novelizations as of late. While transferring characters from one universe to another has gone on for ages, as has retellings of classic tales, it's only when Quirk started its little cottage industry did things really start to ramp up. As for me, some of them I really love, and some I don't. Two of my favorite things in the world are William Shakespeare and HP Lovecraft, so when I saw that there was a mashup novella tha Thanks to Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, there has been no dearth of mashup novelizations as of late. While transferring characters from one universe to another has gone on for ages, as has retellings of classic tales, it's only when Quirk started its little cottage industry did things really start to ramp up. As for me, some of them I really love, and some I don't. Two of my favorite things in the world are William Shakespeare and HP Lovecraft, so when I saw that there was a mashup novella that applied the Cthulhu Mythos with the works/characters of Shakespeare, I had to ultimately dive in and give it a shot. The end result? Well... First, it's not really a mashup in the truest sense, nor is it exactly all that funny for a comedy. The plot is pretty much Shakespeare's major characters battling Lovecraft's demons, sometimes as a coherent plot and sometimes as a side story. The most important story is Prospero (from The Tempest going crazy thanks to The Necronomicon and thus working out a deal with Cthulhu. There are as many nods to Hamlet as there are Re-Animator, and it moves at such a fast clip that even a more seasoned eye for the two authors is bound to miss the references here and there. I don't think this book is bad, per se. I didn't love what I was reading, but I was able to appreciate it. At 86 pages, it doesn't hang around too long, which means it's not wearing out its welcome the way many of the Quick mashups do. The problem with the book, on a whole, is more that it just doesn't really do much. It's less a story than a writing exercise, and it's conceptually fun in that classic self-published way in which, perhaps, someone would have been able to say "okay, okay, that's enough" before it got too far. If you're a hardcore fan of the Bard or the Weird, this is worth a look. It will take you no time at all to soldier through and get something out of it. If this is more of a casual interest, however, it's probably not going to succeed at entertaining you. The joy in this book comes less from the story and more from the references within.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Squirrel

    (It should be noted that I received a free copy through a Goodreads giveaway.) 2.5ish stars The two things that first drew me to the book were (1) the cover, which reminded me of a Diablo character creation screen and (2) the combination of Shakespeare and Lovecraft. I love Shakespeare, I love Lovecraft, and I love horror-comedy as a genre, so this seemed like it would be a fun read. (Plus I was immensely curious as to how Shakespeare and Lovecraft can be mixed.) The Good: - It is indeed a lot of fu (It should be noted that I received a free copy through a Goodreads giveaway.) 2.5ish stars The two things that first drew me to the book were (1) the cover, which reminded me of a Diablo character creation screen and (2) the combination of Shakespeare and Lovecraft. I love Shakespeare, I love Lovecraft, and I love horror-comedy as a genre, so this seemed like it would be a fun read. (Plus I was immensely curious as to how Shakespeare and Lovecraft can be mixed.) The Good: - It is indeed a lot of fun appreciating the cross-references between Shakespeare and Lovecraft that O'Brien makes. Even while doing this, O'Brien manages to make a story all his own. I especially liked the chapters featuring Richard III and Romeo. - The dialogue was great. The heart of O'Brien's humor can be found in how he uses it, and he's quite clever. I can imagine this being quite enjoyable written in play form, which is a testament to his homage to Shakespeare. The quotes from Shakespeare's plays are also integrated smoothly into the new storyline and are well-chosen. The Eh: - The prose is noticeably and distractingly uneven. The first chapter is overdone with adjective overdoses. For example: "A chaotic whirl of waters crashed against the rugged cliff face as ghoulish black clouds of grotesque contour rested and brooded like unwholesome vultures." The sheer quantity of adjectives just makes the sentence clunky. The sentence describes a powerful image, but the power of it is dragged down in clumsy verbosity. There's an extremely high concentration of this in the first chapter, which made me hyperaware of it in subsequent sections, where the problem shows itself on occasion. Once you get past the first chapter, the prose clears up some. While there are still some instances of cringing, there are also some nice sentences. "There are vocal qualities peculiar to men, and vocal qualities peculiar to beasts; and it is terrible to hear one when the source should yield the other," conveyed a sense of horror that lingers after one has read it. - There were enough punctuation mark mishaps and typos for me to take note and remember afterwards.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julie Dawson

    Like so many Saturday Night Live skits that were turned into movies, Shakespeare v Lovecraft demonstrates that a concept that can be funny and insightful in small doses often becomes cumbersome and overblown when you try to take it onto a larger stage. This horror comedy mash up combines Shakespeare’s The Tempest (with cameos and guest appearances from the characters of Henry VIII, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and others) with the mind-destroying machinations of Lovecraft’s Great Old Ones (of whic Like so many Saturday Night Live skits that were turned into movies, Shakespeare v Lovecraft demonstrates that a concept that can be funny and insightful in small doses often becomes cumbersome and overblown when you try to take it onto a larger stage. This horror comedy mash up combines Shakespeare’s The Tempest (with cameos and guest appearances from the characters of Henry VIII, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and others) with the mind-destroying machinations of Lovecraft’s Great Old Ones (of which everyone’s favorite Destroyer of Sanity, Cthulhu, takes the central role). As a fan of both The Bard’s work and Lovecraft’s Mythos, I wanted to enjoy this book. The story of the magician Prospero is a good choice for this sort of experiment, as it seems a natural fit for the Mythos. Unfortunately, the delivery does not live up to the promise. Much of the prose reads like it was written by someone whose only contact with the subject matter was via Cliff Notes (or Wikipedia). The basic academic points are there, but what is missing is the actual spirit of the works. It lacks Shakespeare’s lyrical prose. It lacks Lovecraft’s dark foreshadowing. There are points where the author stacks adverbs on top of adverbs in a way that left me unclear if he was just doing a poor job of emulating Shakespeare’s style or outright mocking it. And while I never expected the book to actually achieve the literary heights of Shakespeare or Lovecraft, I did at least expect it to be funny. I can forgive overblown writing if you at least make me smile with a clever observation or a witty bit of satire. While there are a few moments where I chuckled, for the most part the narrative is dry and unentertaining. Reviewer note: My review is based off of a digital comp galley copy of this book

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adeselna

    Although it pains me greatly to give only 1-star, I feel that the author had such greatness in his hands that he just blew it all! I mean you think Shakespeare an Lovecraft and you are like: oh yeah, baby! And then both wold collide and your enthusiasms goes down all the hill! I studied Shakespeare, I read Lovecraft: I enjoyed both, yeah sure I prefer Poe to Lovecraft, but that does not mean I do not enjoy him. However, this mixture is odd, some sentences have too much purple prose and in the en Although it pains me greatly to give only 1-star, I feel that the author had such greatness in his hands that he just blew it all! I mean you think Shakespeare an Lovecraft and you are like: oh yeah, baby! And then both wold collide and your enthusiasms goes down all the hill! I studied Shakespeare, I read Lovecraft: I enjoyed both, yeah sure I prefer Poe to Lovecraft, but that does not mean I do not enjoy him. However, this mixture is odd, some sentences have too much purple prose and in the end, the reader ends ups yawning instead of laughing. It fails to achieve Shakespeare's greatness and Lovecraft's horror. This book shows that you must think twice before getting your hands on Shakespeare's work and do something with it. The way the paragraphs are structured influences the flow, some paragraphs should be merged. In the end, the author could have it all, but honestly I don't believe he succeeded. My regards to NetGalley for allowing me to read this book :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kitty Honeycutt

    Title: Shakespeare Vs. Lovecraft Author(s): William Shakespeare, H.P. Lovecraft & D.R. O'Brien Publisher: Obiedan Publications Ages: 17+ Rating: 5 Review: I have long been a Shakespeare & Lovecraft fan and this book has made my dream come true! D.R. O'Brien has a supreme talent that cannot be denied. Over the years I have heard so many people say they have a hard time reading either of these authors because they can't understand the way they write. In this book that's not a problem. D.R. O'Brien marr Title: Shakespeare Vs. Lovecraft Author(s): William Shakespeare, H.P. Lovecraft & D.R. O'Brien Publisher: Obiedan Publications Ages: 17+ Rating: 5 Review: I have long been a Shakespeare & Lovecraft fan and this book has made my dream come true! D.R. O'Brien has a supreme talent that cannot be denied. Over the years I have heard so many people say they have a hard time reading either of these authors because they can't understand the way they write. In this book that's not a problem. D.R. O'Brien marries the two so well and flawlessly as to create a story you will not believe could ever have been possible. I highly recommend this mix of Shakespeare's most memorable characters with Lovecraft's most amazing monsters. A truly great read especially for fans of both writers and new potential fans of D.R. O'Brien.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I got a copy of this ebook to review from NetGalley, I was interested in reading it because I really enjoyed Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and Jane Slayer, and Little Women and Werewolves. I found the beginning a bit slow to get into, but once I got to the part of the story with Richard III and then Romeo, I began to really enjoy the story. I liked the use of the Shakespeare quotes, even if they weren't said by the correct character, they were used to fit the story well. I think that this wou I got a copy of this ebook to review from NetGalley, I was interested in reading it because I really enjoyed Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and Jane Slayer, and Little Women and Werewolves. I found the beginning a bit slow to get into, but once I got to the part of the story with Richard III and then Romeo, I began to really enjoy the story. I liked the use of the Shakespeare quotes, even if they weren't said by the correct character, they were used to fit the story well. I think that this would make a great comic book, or a movie would be fun. Over all I enjoyed this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Shakespeare vs. Lovecraft was a fun read, but it was rather flawed. The battle scenes were excellent, but there wasn’t enough plot or character development for a true novel. I found the numerous quotations from Shakespeare distracting; every time I came across one, I couldn’t help but think, “that character’s not in that play,” “a different character is supposed to say that,” and sometimes, “that line doesn’t mean that.” Despite its flaws, Shakespeare vs. Lovecraft was enjoyable, just not somethi Shakespeare vs. Lovecraft was a fun read, but it was rather flawed. The battle scenes were excellent, but there wasn’t enough plot or character development for a true novel. I found the numerous quotations from Shakespeare distracting; every time I came across one, I couldn’t help but think, “that character’s not in that play,” “a different character is supposed to say that,” and sometimes, “that line doesn’t mean that.” Despite its flaws, Shakespeare vs. Lovecraft was enjoyable, just not something that I’ll want to reread anytime soon. Received via Goodeads.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pedro

    This was another wow book, for the novelty, not so much for the "interest" in the end. The writing is a bit confusing, as you are pushed into the story, not knowing a whole lot. The characters and their interactions are very fun to read, as is the story as a whole. However, it just didn't click for me as a great book. It's a great idea, nonetheless and the author has to be praised for it. Recommend it if you like to explore the funny side of dark themes. This was another wow book, for the novelty, not so much for the "interest" in the end. The writing is a bit confusing, as you are pushed into the story, not knowing a whole lot. The characters and their interactions are very fun to read, as is the story as a whole. However, it just didn't click for me as a great book. It's a great idea, nonetheless and the author has to be praised for it. Recommend it if you like to explore the funny side of dark themes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    April

    Disclosure: This ebook was provided to me free of charge through NetGalley for the sole purpose of an honest review. All thoughts, comments, and ratings are my own. Really interesting tale that had my attention the whole time. The pace was wonderful and the characters engaging. Beautiful storytelling that kept me on the edge of my seat! Great cover art!!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Shakespeare si starà rivoltando nella tomba.. ma Lovecraft starà sogghignando! Divertente pastiche tra le opere Shakespiriane ed i Miti di Chthulhu. Richard III Re-Animator e Romeo mi hanno fatto venire le lacrime agli occhi dal ridere.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Received as a review copy of NetGalley. This book amused me so much. Those that know me, know I am a drama geek from way back and LOVE Shakespeare. This book was so cute in the most awesome of ways. If you like mash up books give them one a try.

  23. 4 out of 5

    DAISY DISNEY

    **I received a free copy from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review** I am sorry to say I could not get into this book. I found it hard to understand the style of writing. I was not able to finish the book. This one was just not for me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Being neither a Shakespeare fan and not knowing anything about Lovecraft characters I didn't know what I was getting myself into. That being said this book was well written and fast paced. Have to say still not a Shakespeare fan but you should give this book a try. Being neither a Shakespeare fan and not knowing anything about Lovecraft characters I didn't know what I was getting myself into. That being said this book was well written and fast paced. Have to say still not a Shakespeare fan but you should give this book a try.

  25. 4 out of 5

    The Old

    Haven't read Lovecraft at all although know a little Shakespeare from attending theater with my other! Lots of fun set pieces and great dialogue... great fun. Haven't read Lovecraft at all although know a little Shakespeare from attending theater with my other! Lots of fun set pieces and great dialogue... great fun.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Loved this book, this is the 1st one of these types of books that I have read. I am a big fan of Shakespeare, and I have heard of Lovecraft. An interesting concoction of meshed up stories.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paddy O'callaghan

    Tip top Tastic. Lets have loads more books lie this. Sequels, prequels you name it. Thats Mr O'Brien. Tip top Tastic. Lets have loads more books lie this. Sequels, prequels you name it. Thats Mr O'Brien.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Yang

  29. 4 out of 5

    Talia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ankur Bose

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