Hot Best Seller

Split: A Memoir of Divorce

Availability: Ready to download

Bestselling and award-winning author Finnamore tells the story of her divorce, her marriage, and how it all imploded and came back together. At once quite funny, achingly sad, and unflinchingly fierce, Split speaks to anyone who's endured the end of a relationship. Bestselling and award-winning author Finnamore tells the story of her divorce, her marriage, and how it all imploded and came back together. At once quite funny, achingly sad, and unflinchingly fierce, Split speaks to anyone who's endured the end of a relationship.


Compare

Bestselling and award-winning author Finnamore tells the story of her divorce, her marriage, and how it all imploded and came back together. At once quite funny, achingly sad, and unflinchingly fierce, Split speaks to anyone who's endured the end of a relationship. Bestselling and award-winning author Finnamore tells the story of her divorce, her marriage, and how it all imploded and came back together. At once quite funny, achingly sad, and unflinchingly fierce, Split speaks to anyone who's endured the end of a relationship.

30 review for Split: A Memoir of Divorce

  1. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I was really over this woman by the end of this book. Actually, I was pretty much over her a few pages in. Which is a shame, really, because I very much enjoyed her other two books: The Zygote Chronicles and Otherwise Engaged. But this one? It just seemed so disjointed and piecemeal and (yes, I'll say it) just a little bit self-serving and whiny. Also, the changing of tenses within a single paragraph (and sometimes even a single sentence) DROVE ME CRAZY. If you're writing about a single event, C I was really over this woman by the end of this book. Actually, I was pretty much over her a few pages in. Which is a shame, really, because I very much enjoyed her other two books: The Zygote Chronicles and Otherwise Engaged. But this one? It just seemed so disjointed and piecemeal and (yes, I'll say it) just a little bit self-serving and whiny. Also, the changing of tenses within a single paragraph (and sometimes even a single sentence) DROVE ME CRAZY. If you're writing about a single event, COMMIT TO A TENSE. God, I hated that. Put me right off from the beginning. (Another minor complaint? Referring to her husband and son as "N" and "A." It was so distracting -- couldn't she just have chosen them each a fake name or something? Besides, we all know her son's name is Pablo anyway, so why even call him A?)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I have a Psychology of Love class this semester and I thought this book would be an interesting perspective to get while taking this course. The book is about a woman’s journey of divorce (my worst nightmare). I realized that while divorce is a relatively frequency occurrence in our country, it seems little is known about what a person may be going through. This book did a good job of conveying the process and difficulty inherent in a divorce. The author’s husband, who was the one who left/did t I have a Psychology of Love class this semester and I thought this book would be an interesting perspective to get while taking this course. The book is about a woman’s journey of divorce (my worst nightmare). I realized that while divorce is a relatively frequency occurrence in our country, it seems little is known about what a person may be going through. This book did a good job of conveying the process and difficulty inherent in a divorce. The author’s husband, who was the one who left/did the divorcing, is referred to only by his first initial, which made me feel as if I was getting a peek into some secret salacious files. Suzanne Finnamore constructed her book according to the stages of death, which I found appropriate. Divorce is a death of a relationship and a life you once knew. My favorite chapter was grief. The reader was left with the notion that she was much better off even though she honestly portrays her past devotion to a normal man. She doesn’t paint him as a villain. But she does refer to his new girlfriend as “Thing Woman”. The novel dealt with a very devastating subject with a sense of irreverent humor and a certain type of breeziness. An example, one of her chapter titles is “The Highly Symbolic Transcontinental Sojourn of The Recently Divorced”. Her “simple yet elegant tips” for divorce include: “#3 Keep everything beginning with consonants. #5 Sequester precious items at a friend’s house. Men never remember what they have-if they did, they would not have ruined their lives by running around with whores. Younger Readers: There is some language. Favorite Quote: “In a just universe, there would be a place where love and marriages go to die, rapture’s own version of the elephants’ graveyard. They should not be allowed to dissipate on their own, to float away on some random moment, irrevocable as seed from a dandelion. There ought to be a body you can bury. A gravesite: Here Lies the Marriage of N and S, with beginning and ending dates inscribed into the marble. One could visit the grave, say a few words. Instead I am faced with an acidic sense of loss and the feeling that a passage has been missed in the scheme of tings. There are so many marriage ceremonies, there ought to be one for divorce. Instead of rice, people could throw fistfuls of cash and light hallucinogens. I also wish I could send a message into every tortured, depressed, and betrayed woman’s mind at this very moment so they would just turn mid-step and say with perfect clarity to their husbands: ‘Oh, wait-this is crazy. I’m leaving you. Feel free to go and make some other lucky woman’s life this exact shade of black.’”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Ugh, this was horrible. I couldn't even make it halfway through. I'm all for reading about depressing topics, so that's not what turned me off. There was just nothing redeeming about it - it wasn't funny, I didn't learn anything, none of the characters were likable, sympathetic or real (even though they're real people!). Maybe it's just me, but I did not get this book. Ugh, this was horrible. I couldn't even make it halfway through. I'm all for reading about depressing topics, so that's not what turned me off. There was just nothing redeeming about it - it wasn't funny, I didn't learn anything, none of the characters were likable, sympathetic or real (even though they're real people!). Maybe it's just me, but I did not get this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kricket

    Reread- September 2021 Finnamore's references to cross-dressing or tendency to lapse into offensive accents did not age well. (More accurate: were also offensive on the first read but I didn't notice because I'm a ding-dong.) I don't relate to her or her method of dealing with adversity as much as I did in my 20s, which is weird because now I am the age she was when she got divorced. That said I still enjoy the crafting of her lovely sentences. First read- August 2012 i like to read about marriage Reread- September 2021 Finnamore's references to cross-dressing or tendency to lapse into offensive accents did not age well. (More accurate: were also offensive on the first read but I didn't notice because I'm a ding-dong.) I don't relate to her or her method of dealing with adversity as much as I did in my 20s, which is weird because now I am the age she was when she got divorced. That said I still enjoy the crafting of her lovely sentences. First read- August 2012 i like to read about marriage and marriages, even bad ones. but it took me a few years to pick this one up because i loved suzanne finnamore's novels, which seemed to be based on her life, and it made me upset that her husband wound up being a doofus. still. what better day to begin a book about a divorce than my 6 year wedding anniversary? (my husband is used to me; didn't even bat an eye.) ANYWAY. finnamore throws us right in the water by beginning mere seconds before her husband tells her he's out, and launches us into a nearly-flawless account of all her feelings and reactions, reasonable and unreasonable. even better, they're hysterical. i don't know who i love more, suzanne's mom, bunny, or her friend christian. they're the people i used to read about in memoirs and think "nobody's friends are really like that, are they? breezing into your life when you need them with exactly the perfect thing to say." and then i met this woman named kat who cuts my hair, so now i know these people really do exist. where was i? i love that the ending isn't full of platitudes and lessons learned, as i feared from reading the book flap. sure, suzanne learns some things. she might be ready for love again someday. but nothing's perfect. it is what it is. the one thing that bothered me is how much she seemed to see this coming (cocktail napkin, etc) without actually opening her eyes to see it coming. but she freely admits that she did this. again, nobody's perfect. every single WORD in this memoir seems as though it has been hand-carved exactly for the occasion. it has ruined me for other books, which all seem plodding and clunky in comparison.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie Ehlers

    Several years ago, I read Suzanne Finnamore's novel about getting married, Otherwise Engaged, and kind of assumed it was autobiographical. We got the beginning of the story with that book, and now, with this memoir, we get the end of the story. To be honest, in this book Finnamore seems rather pathetic and certainly petty, but I suppose we all would if placed in a similar situation. She somehow does manage to describe and give voice to a lot of emotions that seem as if they'd be hard to put into Several years ago, I read Suzanne Finnamore's novel about getting married, Otherwise Engaged, and kind of assumed it was autobiographical. We got the beginning of the story with that book, and now, with this memoir, we get the end of the story. To be honest, in this book Finnamore seems rather pathetic and certainly petty, but I suppose we all would if placed in a similar situation. She somehow does manage to describe and give voice to a lot of emotions that seem as if they'd be hard to put into words, so ultimately I was impressed by this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kim Bui

    Split: A Memoir of Divorce tells the story of Suzanne Finnamore, a woman who gets divorced ought to write a memoir about it. At first, the book is set at the age of 40 years old woman, who live in California, where everything happening so fast that she didn't know what to do. Wanting nothing but a happy family, N (her husband) came home with a divorce application that is already signed with his signature, handed it to Finnamore without holding back anything. The book examines on how she may have Split: A Memoir of Divorce tells the story of Suzanne Finnamore, a woman who gets divorced ought to write a memoir about it. At first, the book is set at the age of 40 years old woman, who live in California, where everything happening so fast that she didn't know what to do. Wanting nothing but a happy family, N (her husband) came home with a divorce application that is already signed with his signature, handed it to Finnamore without holding back anything. The book examines on how she may have gained new material when her husband walked out of their upscale northern-California home and began taking luxury vacations with a woman who is the reason why he wanted to divorce his wife and soon became pregnant. The separation with her husband left her with anger, toddler, and a heartbroken. The most memorable event in the book so far was when she met an old friend, after 2 months of divorcing her husband, where everything changed when Christian appeared in her life and started to shine again. Making the decision to whether accept or reject his feeling, but Finnamore knows that there is always a place for her husband in her heart. The book is addressing that fact that a woman cannot move on, but stay in one place, waiting for a guy, who cheated on her to come back to her life. Ultimately, this story of Suzanne Finnamore‘s life experience, who is caring, loving, and sacrificing for her husband and the family so much. The tone of Split resembles of a breezy game that the couple and their son played before the decree came through. Perhaps a stupid and confused relationship that required Finnamore and her ex-husband to make a right decision for themselves and their son. It all adds up to a table of two people made a wrong choice in life, which is an example of unhealthy relationship that they couldn’t fight for it or letting it go. Split: A Memoir of Divorce is a terrific piece of writing, a powerful, moving, and heartbreaking story of Fennimore learned that the divorce is the ugliest thing in the world. I would absolutely recommend this book to readers that interested in life experiences because this book can be relate so much to some people, who have experienced heartache, and ultimate betrayal of divorce or those currently experiencing it. I’ve enjoyed reading this book, those it made me cry, laugh and sometime feel her pain that the writer had to go through. From reading this book, l learned that for every bad relationship there is a lesson to learn from. Every relationship that ended up in break up carries a special lesson that open up ourselves for reasons and questions of what went wrong. What I personally know that no matter what the outcome of any failed relationship would help us become more mature and experienced in dealing with failures. This is life what all about. The book made me feel that every bad relationship will leave a scar in our life. This proves to be true, because after the divorce, she left with a heartbroken. I also felt that I was somewhat can relate to the book because I’ve had experience a bad relationship before.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonna Rubin

    I've been a fan of Finnamore since -- well, it feels like it's been since the day I started reading books, but we all know that makes no sense, as I'm not an infant. She is by far one of the most underrated writers of our time, and her background as an advertising copywriter is reflected in every page, every pithy sentence that is perfectly constructed to capture as much meaning as possible. Split is no exception, and brings the same concise brilliance that Otherwise Engaged and The Zygote Chron I've been a fan of Finnamore since -- well, it feels like it's been since the day I started reading books, but we all know that makes no sense, as I'm not an infant. She is by far one of the most underrated writers of our time, and her background as an advertising copywriter is reflected in every page, every pithy sentence that is perfectly constructed to capture as much meaning as possible. Split is no exception, and brings the same concise brilliance that Otherwise Engaged and The Zygote Chronicles demonstrated so successfully. There isn't a wasted word here -- she perfectly captures entire scenes, emotions, inner monologues -- in raw, electric sentences that leap off the page. I'll admit, I read this with a touch of melancholy, for I have always read "Otherwise Engaged" and "The Zygote Chronicles" as fictionalized memoirs, and I felt that I knew the characters already, it's just that they happened to be wearing new pseudonyms. And to watch the dissolution of the family I felt that I was privileged to see grow was an oddly personal experience for me. Although, to be frank, it would be difficult NOT to read this novel with a personal sense of sadness, for Finnamore so accurately captures every emotion -- every tortured moment of anger and frustration and sadness -- in such a universal way that it's as though you're living through it with her. It's a brilliant journey of heartbreak, sadness, and ultimately redemption, laced with Finnamore's trademark black humor. Divorce, it seems, can be deadly funny. That being said, I don't recommend you start here if you're new to Finnamore. Although the book stands alone on its own merit, I must add that there is an extra layer of poignancy added if you've read her other two novels. By the time she emerges victorious, if battered, from her journey, you're as triumphant as she is, for you've seen not just the bad, but the good, too, that made the road that much more difficult.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    This is the story of one woman's divorce. It has been very beneficial to me. She works her way through the stages of grief and finally comes to acceptance. This book is certainly not for everyone but since the author also has a child with her former husband, her stories rang so true to me. She has learned how to deal and accept the former and still allow her son to love his father. Some really good advice. But yet my friend who has been divorced for over three years said since she has already gon This is the story of one woman's divorce. It has been very beneficial to me. She works her way through the stages of grief and finally comes to acceptance. This book is certainly not for everyone but since the author also has a child with her former husband, her stories rang so true to me. She has learned how to deal and accept the former and still allow her son to love his father. Some really good advice. But yet my friend who has been divorced for over three years said since she has already gone through these stages, it didn't mean a thing to her. So for the right person, it is a helpful and reaffirming of emotions book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sofia Kirschn

    I totally understand why so many people didn't like this book. I did. Suzanne explores the range of thoughts and emotions that go along with having your partner one day declare they're leaving because they're suddenly "no longer happy". It's a very accurate account of the observer's side of a stereotypical mid-life crisis. If you haven't been through it, you'll blissfully think it could never happen to me and likely be repulsed by the story. If you have been through it, you'll totally recognize I totally understand why so many people didn't like this book. I did. Suzanne explores the range of thoughts and emotions that go along with having your partner one day declare they're leaving because they're suddenly "no longer happy". It's a very accurate account of the observer's side of a stereotypical mid-life crisis. If you haven't been through it, you'll blissfully think it could never happen to me and likely be repulsed by the story. If you have been through it, you'll totally recognize the pattern and find her insights honest and at times funny. I'm keen to try more of her writing ;)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    I would've divorced her too. I would've divorced her too.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    I hoped to relate more but just didn't. I noticed throughout that the writing felt disjointed to me, but I'm curious about her magazine column. I appreciate everyone's journey is different, but I didn't feel much for myself in learning about hers. The end. I hoped to relate more but just didn't. I noticed throughout that the writing felt disjointed to me, but I'm curious about her magazine column. I appreciate everyone's journey is different, but I didn't feel much for myself in learning about hers. The end.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

    Very disappointing book. Divorce is an interesting topic, and a firsthand account of going through it could be fascinating. My American U. colleague Wendy Swallow wrote an excellent book on this very subject a few years back. Split was hard to finish, however. The author has funny moments, and I can see why she's a popular magazine contributor, but her perspective was too narrow to carry a book. The other "characters" [her son "A" and her ex "N" -- why not just make up full-word names? -- and her Very disappointing book. Divorce is an interesting topic, and a firsthand account of going through it could be fascinating. My American U. colleague Wendy Swallow wrote an excellent book on this very subject a few years back. Split was hard to finish, however. The author has funny moments, and I can see why she's a popular magazine contributor, but her perspective was too narrow to carry a book. The other "characters" [her son "A" and her ex "N" -- why not just make up full-word names? -- and her mother "Bunny" are the main ones] are two-dimensional. 250 pages and pretty much all you find out about the ex is that he is attractive, drinks his coffee black, and cheated on her. The one passage that will probably stick with me is the author's comparing notes with her mom after sleeping with the ex [which she did frequently for a while after the breakup], and both of them agreed that post-breakup sex with their ex-husbands was the best they ever had. Seemed like the sort of quirky coincidence you read about in studies of twins reared apart (though they had never met before, they both nicknamed their sons “Buster” and were married to women named Janice who loved jai alai……….).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    Others have been critical of her tense-changes and writing style, but I rather liked the latter. Except for the inexplicable lexicon of calling her husband, "N" and son, "A" throughout the book, her style was refreshingly different. Suzanne is obviously highly intelligent, quite funny with some wonderful glimpses into dark sarcasm, and is understandably self-indulgent (I mean, why would a reader expect anything different as this is, after all, the memoir of her divorce?!) but it just seemed to m Others have been critical of her tense-changes and writing style, but I rather liked the latter. Except for the inexplicable lexicon of calling her husband, "N" and son, "A" throughout the book, her style was refreshingly different. Suzanne is obviously highly intelligent, quite funny with some wonderful glimpses into dark sarcasm, and is understandably self-indulgent (I mean, why would a reader expect anything different as this is, after all, the memoir of her divorce?!) but it just seemed to me that she wrote this memoir too early in her post-divorce journey. Perhaps, if she had had more time to absorb her divorce and put some distance between her as The Divorce Lady and as the author of Otherwise Engaged, I think that sharp wit of hers would have come through more clearly and resonated better with her readers. Retail therapy and exemption from the typical financial peril that results in the catastrophe that is "divorce", made it difficult to connect with her and empathize with her situation. I found myself observing from the periphery of her life versus being able to get into the memoir and *experience* it with her.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Kind of depressing so far, but that's expected since the book is about divorce.. Just finished this one and I liked, definitely not loved it. Aside from the fact that I'm happily married, I couldn't relate to the author; she is well off, lives in a house she owns, is able to work from home as a writer, and able to jaunt off to Paris at a moment's notice. I probably wouldn't recommend this to anyone going through a divorce, as it can obviously get a little ugly and probably wouldn't be very helpfu Kind of depressing so far, but that's expected since the book is about divorce.. Just finished this one and I liked, definitely not loved it. Aside from the fact that I'm happily married, I couldn't relate to the author; she is well off, lives in a house she owns, is able to work from home as a writer, and able to jaunt off to Paris at a moment's notice. I probably wouldn't recommend this to anyone going through a divorce, as it can obviously get a little ugly and probably wouldn't be very helpful. It's better for someone maybe five years after a divorce. I don't think I would recommend it to married friends either, since it is kind of a downer. I definitely wouldn't recommend it to anyone planning their wedding, or engaged. Wow, I think that leaves single people..who probably don't want to read about someone going through their divorce. There was one line I'll remember from the book, though. The author's mother tells her, "Remember the parachuter's motto....don't wait too long." That's probably good advice for life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    Although the writing here is not astounding in a literary sense (not like Lorrie Moore's Birds in America), she does have a quick wit, some dark humor, and a good story line. The book, to put it simply, is about a woman who is going through a divorce. It begins simply, does not do much woe is me stuff, and gets right into the meat of things. The characters are good, some surprising which is nice, and she is honest. I gave it a 4 because I'm thinking that perhaps I am jaded right now. This book was Although the writing here is not astounding in a literary sense (not like Lorrie Moore's Birds in America), she does have a quick wit, some dark humor, and a good story line. The book, to put it simply, is about a woman who is going through a divorce. It begins simply, does not do much woe is me stuff, and gets right into the meat of things. The characters are good, some surprising which is nice, and she is honest. I gave it a 4 because I'm thinking that perhaps I am jaded right now. This book was a comfort for me in going through my divorce; it helped me to see that I am not alone which I know sounds funny as I am most certainly not alone in a country with a 50%+ divorce rate. Nonetheless, I did find it comforting. The last chapter of the book, while it might be somewhat easy, gave me food for thought, made me wonder if the beauty of the beginning of a relationship can be valued even if the ending is shit. (Sorry--can't think of another word that works quite as well there.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I read Finnamores memoir of divorce .And when I finished, I read it again. Anyone who thinks she is whiny or exaggerates has clearly not lived through one of the most painful episodes a woman can experience. She is honest and engaging in her description of the emotional pain and turmoil that betrayal and divorce cause. Anyone who thinks it is not realistic should count their lucky stars that they have not been through it. Her style is a little quirky. I loved that It suits the story line and the I read Finnamores memoir of divorce .And when I finished, I read it again. Anyone who thinks she is whiny or exaggerates has clearly not lived through one of the most painful episodes a woman can experience. She is honest and engaging in her description of the emotional pain and turmoil that betrayal and divorce cause. Anyone who thinks it is not realistic should count their lucky stars that they have not been through it. Her style is a little quirky. I loved that It suits the story line and the roller coaster of emotions that she experienced. I look forward to reading other works by Suzanne Finnamore.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    There are some very funny moments in this memoir of the author's divorce. Her husband leaves her when their son is two and appears to have no strong feelings about it. She paints a fuller picture as the narrative goes on. He's not all bad. There were signs he was emotionally distant way before he left the marriage but she admits she refused to acknowledge the signs. You want to shake her during her phase of trying to get him back, but in all, I had a lot of empathy for her trying to get through There are some very funny moments in this memoir of the author's divorce. Her husband leaves her when their son is two and appears to have no strong feelings about it. She paints a fuller picture as the narrative goes on. He's not all bad. There were signs he was emotionally distant way before he left the marriage but she admits she refused to acknowledge the signs. You want to shake her during her phase of trying to get him back, but in all, I had a lot of empathy for her trying to get through it all without poisoning her son for his father.

  18. 5 out of 5

    (Lonestarlibrarian) Keddy Ann Outlaw

    A soul-spilling, gut-wrenching memoir of divorce, telling it like it was before, during and after Suzanne's husband walked out the door. And I think there are legions of women who have been through divorce dramas who would appreciate this book, no matter when their marriage broke. Laugh, suffer, binge drink and cry with Suzanne. I could totally identify with her push-pull attraction to her soon-to-be ex, the father of her young son, soon to be the father of his new paramour's child. Aaaarrrggghh A soul-spilling, gut-wrenching memoir of divorce, telling it like it was before, during and after Suzanne's husband walked out the door. And I think there are legions of women who have been through divorce dramas who would appreciate this book, no matter when their marriage broke. Laugh, suffer, binge drink and cry with Suzanne. I could totally identify with her push-pull attraction to her soon-to-be ex, the father of her young son, soon to be the father of his new paramour's child. Aaaarrrggghhhhh! Finnamore's sense of humor and literary talents shine all through her tale of Splitsville.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carin

    Wow, as she has shown in her previous books, Ms. Finnamore's writing chops are sharp as nails. You feel caught up in her pain and crises, and luckily she's also periodically funny so the book isn't irretrievably depressing. Her mother, Bunny is hilarious and honest, and the way Suzanne gets through this personal nightmare shows her resiliance and determination. Divorce is never fun, but this is a fantastic memoir of the process. Wow, as she has shown in her previous books, Ms. Finnamore's writing chops are sharp as nails. You feel caught up in her pain and crises, and luckily she's also periodically funny so the book isn't irretrievably depressing. Her mother, Bunny is hilarious and honest, and the way Suzanne gets through this personal nightmare shows her resiliance and determination. Divorce is never fun, but this is a fantastic memoir of the process.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I've been reading a lot about divorce and custody for a novel I'm thinking of writing, and so this was perfect. It was beautifully written and told me the story of their divorce in scenes and dialogue, fully fleshed out, instead of in dry prose with bullet points. (as seen in books like Divorce for Dummies.) From everything I've read the process of divorce itself sounds horrific. Good conflict for a novel, glad I'm not living through it at the moment. I've been reading a lot about divorce and custody for a novel I'm thinking of writing, and so this was perfect. It was beautifully written and told me the story of their divorce in scenes and dialogue, fully fleshed out, instead of in dry prose with bullet points. (as seen in books like Divorce for Dummies.) From everything I've read the process of divorce itself sounds horrific. Good conflict for a novel, glad I'm not living through it at the moment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Kotin

    SPLIT is a stunning work. The writing is spare and cuts to the core. It is a quietly funny, devastating story of a wife and mother dealing with divorce when it hits from left field. At first I was a little put off by the very short chapters (often 1-2 pages) with chapter titles that appear in the chapter itself, but the writing is so strong and so clear, I quickly fell into the rhythm of the work and was taken on a memorable ride by this bold and confident writer. Bravo.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    I keep reading these divorce memoirs thinking something is going to click and make me feel better about my life. So far not so much. Where are the memoirs about the poor women? I could relate to the raw emotions this author shared. I think those feelings of being betrayed and replaced are universal. I also really liked her mom. She was a wise and cool lady.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Raw, jarring, and full of the dark sarcastic humor and wit that Finnamore brings to each of her books. Its succint, but very powerful, and definitely will strike a chord with anoyone who knows someone who went through divorce.

  24. 4 out of 5

    SadieReadsAgain

    This is one of a few divorce memoirs I bought to get me through the end of my own marriage. This is very different to the first of these I read (Liadan Hynes' How to Fall Apart: Things I’ve Learned About Losing and Finding Love, which is very focused on what she did to heal and is more of a self-help book), in that it is laser-focused on Finnamore's own feelings and reactions. I really enjoyed that perspective. It also deals directly with infidelity, which I feel gives a divorce a very different This is one of a few divorce memoirs I bought to get me through the end of my own marriage. This is very different to the first of these I read (Liadan Hynes' How to Fall Apart: Things I’ve Learned About Losing and Finding Love, which is very focused on what she did to heal and is more of a self-help book), in that it is laser-focused on Finnamore's own feelings and reactions. I really enjoyed that perspective. It also deals directly with infidelity, which I feel gives a divorce a very different taint. This book is structured around the stages of grief, which I really appreciated. Given that divorce is so commonplace in modern society, it can often not be taken as seriously in the eyes of others when someone is experiencing it. But it really is a loss akin to a death, particularly when the circumstances around it mean that one partner was not expecting it and doesn't want it, and when the actions of the divorcing spouse leave the bereft one feeling as if they didn't really know that person at all. Finnamore opens this memoir at the exact moment her husband told her he wanted a divorce, and details the drip-truth as the pieces around his sudden announcement slowly fit into place. She is honest about the red flags leading up to the marriage breakdown which she either ignored or didn't see; how she used alcohol to cope; how difficult it was for her to function, and even about the things that many desperate abandoned partners will do to try and prevent the destruction of the life and family they had built. Throughout this, she also has some quirky but wonderful characters who rally round to support her, share in her disbelief and give her some tough love along the way. She maintains a snarkiness and dark humour that really spoke to me, and I appreciated her pettiness. She keeps it real, which is essential because the myth of the dignified divorcee is a narrative that serves no one except those who want to hurt others with impunity. What I felt was lacking was a context for the marriage so we can really empathise with her reaction in the fallout. We learn next to nothing about her ex or their relationship. But I understand that it would be incredibly hard to write about the good times once they have been lost, especially when they have been cancelled out by all that came after. I also get the feeling this was written when things were still fairly raw, so what we miss in the reminiscing we gain in the honesty of her divorce experience. I hope Suzanne has been able to put this time in her life behind her, and flourish in the years since she wrote this.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carol Anne

    Page 10 of Goodreads quotes...middle of the page, a quote from the author which contains a misspelled word, perhaps by the quote people of Goodreads? It jarred me, simply because the title of the book is "A Memoir of Divorce" but the misspelled word is "marriage." That threw me. It would satisfy my soul to have it corrected. Grateful Thanks, carol anne miller Page 10 of Goodreads quotes...middle of the page, a quote from the author which contains a misspelled word, perhaps by the quote people of Goodreads? It jarred me, simply because the title of the book is "A Memoir of Divorce" but the misspelled word is "marriage." That threw me. It would satisfy my soul to have it corrected. Grateful Thanks, carol anne miller

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pete Coleman

    A beautiful, charming, inspiring memoir on the process of divorce Authentic, humorous, emotional, and ultimately inspiring! I read it because my close friend is going through this, and I wanted to have a better understanding of what she was feeling through all of the pain.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sally Kilpatrick

    I read this as research for the book I'm writing, and, whew. This would be the second memoir I've read where a man left a woman with something akin to "I deserve happiness." As if she doesn't. I have to hand it to Finnamore, she pulls no punches here. Also three cheers for her mother, Bunny. I read this as research for the book I'm writing, and, whew. This would be the second memoir I've read where a man left a woman with something akin to "I deserve happiness." As if she doesn't. I have to hand it to Finnamore, she pulls no punches here. Also three cheers for her mother, Bunny.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Kendall

    Just couldn’t feel anything while reading this. Seemed so superficial, her son seemed more like a prop than an actual human.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    this was the 3rd book i read of hers. it was the only one in the biography section. it rang true.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Going through something very similar at the moment, this book made me laugh outloud several times!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.