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Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead

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Become one of the gifted, empowered women God is raising up. Christian women are often led to believe they were created inferior to men, destined to play a secondary role. Proverbs 31 gets morphed into a judgment, the sole standard against which many feel like frauds or failures. But the Bible has much more to say about women! Looking into the lives of 22 mold-breaking women Become one of the gifted, empowered women God is raising up. Christian women are often led to believe they were created inferior to men, destined to play a secondary role. Proverbs 31 gets morphed into a judgment, the sole standard against which many feel like frauds or failures. But the Bible has much more to say about women! Looking into the lives of 22 mold-breaking women of the Bible, bestselling author and women's advocate J. Lee Grady shows that God enables His daughters for amazing--even impossible--exploits. Lee also reveals the empowering, often-overlooked gifts God gives each of His daughters--gifts like wisdom, fruitfulness, boldness and leadership. When women accept and use these gifts, they can live the fearless and beautiful lives of purpose God has ordained for them.


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Become one of the gifted, empowered women God is raising up. Christian women are often led to believe they were created inferior to men, destined to play a secondary role. Proverbs 31 gets morphed into a judgment, the sole standard against which many feel like frauds or failures. But the Bible has much more to say about women! Looking into the lives of 22 mold-breaking women Become one of the gifted, empowered women God is raising up. Christian women are often led to believe they were created inferior to men, destined to play a secondary role. Proverbs 31 gets morphed into a judgment, the sole standard against which many feel like frauds or failures. But the Bible has much more to say about women! Looking into the lives of 22 mold-breaking women of the Bible, bestselling author and women's advocate J. Lee Grady shows that God enables His daughters for amazing--even impossible--exploits. Lee also reveals the empowering, often-overlooked gifts God gives each of His daughters--gifts like wisdom, fruitfulness, boldness and leadership. When women accept and use these gifts, they can live the fearless and beautiful lives of purpose God has ordained for them.

30 review for Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Fearless Daughters of the Bible is a book that goes into detail with studying certain important women figures in the Bible, and shares what we can learn from those women. He mainly focused on one woman per chapter, except the last chapter where we study more than one woman. However, I realized that their were also a lot of examples of women who weren't in the Bible, who live in this present day and age. I was a bit surprised by this since their was also more examples of women in the current day, Fearless Daughters of the Bible is a book that goes into detail with studying certain important women figures in the Bible, and shares what we can learn from those women. He mainly focused on one woman per chapter, except the last chapter where we study more than one woman. However, I realized that their were also a lot of examples of women who weren't in the Bible, who live in this present day and age. I was a bit surprised by this since their was also more examples of women in the current day, than those in the Bible. I give this book 2 out of 5 stars. The main reason for this is because I found Grady's interpretation of certain Scriptures concerning women's roles, to be polar opposite from mine, and unfortunately I didn't agree with much of what he was talking about in the book. Mainly I disagreed with his view of women's ability/calling to be in authority over men in the area of large things such as pastoring churches, and leading large ministries. I personally don't think God has called women to be pastors, but to be homemakers at home, serving their families. While I don't at all think women shouldn't ever teach, I think their should be a balance, and God's Word very clearly states that a woman should not teach a man, so I didn't agree with his views in this area. This was one of the major areas I disagreed with Grady's theology points, this one being the biggest. Sadly, I wasn't really able to relate to this book as much as others, since I didn't agree with much of what he was saying. I'd recommend this book to ladies who have Grady's same viewpoint as far as women being in authority over men, pastoring churches, etc, however if you do not believe this is what God has called women to be, then I'd probably not recommend this book to you. I'd like to thank Chosen Publishing for providing a copy of Fearless Daughters of the Bible to review. All thoughts are mine and 100% honest.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Jensen

    I am not a feminist. I’ve been unconventional for most of my married life, but in retrospect, that was primarily because God was making sure my family was taken care of when difficulty arose later. It hasn’t always been easy for either my husband or me. He was a stay-at-home dad before such a thing was hip, and we faced some challenges because of it. However, in the last few years he wouldn’t have been able to work outside the home because of significant health problems, while I have been compar I am not a feminist. I’ve been unconventional for most of my married life, but in retrospect, that was primarily because God was making sure my family was taken care of when difficulty arose later. It hasn’t always been easy for either my husband or me. He was a stay-at-home dad before such a thing was hip, and we faced some challenges because of it. However, in the last few years he wouldn’t have been able to work outside the home because of significant health problems, while I have been comparatively healthy. My job pays the bills, my insurance paid for most of his medicines and care, and in the last year, it even allowed me some measure of freedom to care for him when I needed to – all things that God prepared our family to experience through His providence. I have often, however, felt guilty because I wasn’t the perfect woman I thought I was supposed to be. I wasn’t raised to believe that conventional roles were all that were available to me, but cultural norms are hard to overcome, and when I became a full-fledged believer in 2009, I set out to see what the Bible had to say about what I should or shouldn’t do. In reading the Word, I found several concerning passages that seemed to speak to my situation. I asked my pastor about them, and he gave me some insight that helped me understand them, but there was still a measure of doubt, particularly when I started to sense that God might be calling me to full time ministry as a preacher. As I read J. Lee Grady’s book, I was blown away. Here were testimonies from the Word of God’s incredible plan for women and insight into their depth of faith and usefulness in the kingdom – many in unconventional ways! The most beautiful insight for me came in the chapter about Mary Magdalene. In this portion, J. Lee Grady points out that for centuries, men have used Eve’s deception in the Garden of Eden to prohibit women from making contributions – they have a legacy of screwing up, and therefore cannot be trusted. But Grady goes on to say that this perspective is flawed because it leaves women with only a partial redemption – a redemption that is less than what God intended. His exact quote is “The Holy Spirit wants us to know that in God’s great plan of redemption He unraveled Eden’s curse. The death and resurrection of Jesus reversed the effects of the Fall.” Of course! God doesn’t want me to have a partial freedom, a snippet of joy, or a half-baked redemption just because I’m a daughter of Eve – He promised me the same grace and eternal life that He promised my brothers in Christ. I am not less saved than they, I am not more saved than they, I am saved to the full extent by the same stroke of mercy. That was a powerful message for me. It will serve as a reminder, in the days and years to come, as I explore more fully God’s call on my life, that His grace wasn’t bestowed on me as an afterthought – I was planned for and provided for in His plan. My redemption wasn’t partial. I, too, am clothed in the righteousness purchased by the blood of my blessed Savior – I am no longer under the curse, I am a child of the King, joint heir with Jesus, and I am charged with the same Great Commission and Great Commandment. If the Holy Spirit is asking me to forsake all and serve, my devotion to Him will allow me no other choice but obedience. I am not excluded or excused from duty because of my gender, just as I am not excluded or excused from redemption because of it. As the Holy Spirit leads, I must follow. Or I will answer to Him for it. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alice Stanford

    This book was such a refreshing read. I have to admit to not being sure about reading this as it is a book for women written by a man; but I think it was actually better for it. I have found a lot of books for women (particularly those written by American Christians) tend to down play the lives of women in the bible and paint them all as homemakers, rather than the risk takers, fighters, prophetesses, and business women that many of them were. I particularly loved the chapter on Esther, about how This book was such a refreshing read. I have to admit to not being sure about reading this as it is a book for women written by a man; but I think it was actually better for it. I have found a lot of books for women (particularly those written by American Christians) tend to down play the lives of women in the bible and paint them all as homemakers, rather than the risk takers, fighters, prophetesses, and business women that many of them were. I particularly loved the chapter on Esther, about how brave she really was to stand up to her husband, the brutal king. No, that story is not romantic, as many people seem to think. Filled with not only stories of biblical women, but women from history and the present day, and not only western women, the global church is represented here! You will be encouraged to love fearlessly. This book will leave you feeling encouraged to use your god given gifts, and make a difference in this world. I personally read it as a devotional, which worked well for me, the chapters were the perfect length to read after a 12 hour shift!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I was excited to get this book, very excited – I love reading about the women in the Bible who have lived out their faith in God and set the stage for all the women to come. Then my balloon popped and I became very disenchanted with what the author started saying – it seems that those of us who are “evangelical” are twisting Scripture. Women should be ministers of churches, we aren’t supposed to be meek, or quiet tempered because if we are then “a woman who is mousy or timid does not reflect the I was excited to get this book, very excited – I love reading about the women in the Bible who have lived out their faith in God and set the stage for all the women to come. Then my balloon popped and I became very disenchanted with what the author started saying – it seems that those of us who are “evangelical” are twisting Scripture. Women should be ministers of churches, we aren’t supposed to be meek, or quiet tempered because if we are then “a woman who is mousy or timid does not reflect the character of Jesus.” I guess the book description should have set off a few warning bells about how we, Christian women are often led to believe we are inferior – I’d like to know when. The only time I ever felt inferior to a man was when I was feminist (by the way he calls the five daughters of Zelophehad the first feminists because the requested an inheritance since they didn’t have brothers). There was some of this book that was enjoyable and I actually got some out of but most of it felt like I was being berated and un-Biblical because I don’t feel that women need to be loud or be pastors in order to serve the Lord or His Kingdom. He sites some scientific studies and tries to expound on Scripture verses that specially say women should not usurp authority over men and others and says they aren’t saying that but something else entirely different, because Jesus Himself even had women in His ministry. While this is true they weren’t preaching but serving, I’ve never felt inferior because I don’t want to be a pastor – the greatest ministry I have right now is to be at home educating my children and raising them – this book makes it seem as if that isn’t something noble because I should want a ministry – and if I did I should not limit myself to a children’s ministry. I can definitely see where this book would be a great read for a Christian who has been made to feel less than and aligns herself with the feminist mindset – however I’ve never experienced this in any church – the women have always been embraced, loved and treated very well, whether they taught Sunday School or only came to worship, women are a vital part of the church. I feel for the women who have been led astray by a church to feel they are less than a man, we are definitely equal but we have different roles and that is how we were created by our Creator. This was a book promoting feminism but wrapped in a pretty package and under the guise of Christianity. **Disclaimer: I was given a copy of this book from Chosen in exchange for my honest opinion, no other compensation was given.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    (I received a free copy from Chosen, a Division of Baker Publishing to review) God values women and has used them throughout history to do amazing, incredible things and change the world. Fearless Daughters of the Bible by J. Lee Grady is a fantastic study and read about some of these amazing women. Looking at 22 different women in the bible, Lee Grady provides insight into gifts God has given women throughout history. Not only did Lee Grady use biblical women of faith, but also stories of amazin (I received a free copy from Chosen, a Division of Baker Publishing to review) God values women and has used them throughout history to do amazing, incredible things and change the world. Fearless Daughters of the Bible by J. Lee Grady is a fantastic study and read about some of these amazing women. Looking at 22 different women in the bible, Lee Grady provides insight into gifts God has given women throughout history. Not only did Lee Grady use biblical women of faith, but also stories of amazing women throughout history who followed their faith and believed the Lord created them for something bigger. I really appreciated a study that looked at all kinds of roles in the bible (from the well known women Sarah, Ruth, Esther, Mary to characters I haven’t studied much like the daughters of Zelophehad, Achsah, Priscilla and Jehosheba). Each chapter left me with something to think about and not just push through reading. (To help the process, there were discussion questions and prayers at the end of each chapter). I was encouraged, convicted and inspired. This is definitely a book I would go through again with other women. I think there is still so much to learn from the book and these women! Here’s a handful of quotes to leave you with: Sarah was chosen for a starring role in God’s redemptive plan, but it was not because of her qualifications or pedigree. The Bible is full of gusty women who stuck their necks out to speak when it was not culturally proper. Heaven smiled on these women. And God knows we need more of them today. Scripture does not offer us a sanitized view of life. The Bible is raw. It tells us how God works with broken, sinful people, and it does not mask their problems or hide their flaws. It should comfort all of us that Jesus Christ’s earthly family had plenty of skeletons in its primitive closets. Prayer is not magic, it’s a process. Under the New Covenant, through the power of the Holy Spirit, both men and women can serve as ministers of His grace. And when He (Jesus) was raised from the dead, He commissioned His faithful disciple Mary Magdalene to blaze that trail for all women to follow. Discipleship requires sacrifice and genuine love. God has the same kind of adventure for you. If you will learn to approach Him with confidence, and believe that your Father longs to give you the Kingdom, you, too, can become a channel of blessing that will affect many. booksandbeverages.wordpress.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet Reeves

    Fearless Daughters of the Bible is a fifteen week study of 22+ women of the Bible. Each chapter tells the story of one biblical woman or group of women. As readers learn about character traits and strengths displayed in these women’s lives, stories of historical or contemporary women who also displayed these traits or strengths are brought into each lesson for greater understanding. Readers see God at work in and through His daughters. They see Him calling, teaching, using, and greatly blessing Fearless Daughters of the Bible is a fifteen week study of 22+ women of the Bible. Each chapter tells the story of one biblical woman or group of women. As readers learn about character traits and strengths displayed in these women’s lives, stories of historical or contemporary women who also displayed these traits or strengths are brought into each lesson for greater understanding. Readers see God at work in and through His daughters. They see Him calling, teaching, using, and greatly blessing the efforts of women devoted to Him. Author J. Lee Grady is not only an award-winning journalist and ordained minister, but also the father of four daughters. He believes the potential contributions of women to God’s Kingdom are often overlooked or dismissed, and so he strives to inspire women to serve God faithfully and with confidence however He leads. Through this book, Fearless Daughters of the Bible, Grady shows that God has a purpose for the women of His Kingdom that we can take seriously. Also woven into the text are messages of encouragement and healing for women who’ve suffered abuse. Women who’ve been mistreated will find some comfort here. The studies themselves do not go into great depth. Grady retells the stories in his own words, then moves right into the life application. However, the summaries are well written. Curious readers can easily dig more deeply into the Bible on their own. Each chapter begins with a quote from a well-known woman. Each ends with discussion questions and a personal message to the reader, presented as a message from our Heavenly Father. Overall, I appreciated Grady’s big picture of God at work in and through women found all through God’s Word. I loved seeing that Jesus, Paul, Philip, and even Peter, greatly valued the ministry contributions women make. I also appreciated the generous amount of life application found in these stories useful to both women and men. The stories of women in the Bible are included by God’s design with messages applicable to both genders. I recommend this book!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ann Saylor

    Women, be ready to be inspired and challenged with J. Lee Grady’s new book, Fearless Daughters of the Bible. The subtitle describes the book well: “What you can learn from 22 women who challenged tradition, fought injustice and dared to lead.” It’s packed with stories of women overcoming personal challenges and defying cultural norms to do God’s work. There are stories of women in the Bible, ranging from common names like Ruth, Esther and Mary Magdalene, to less told stories of the daughters of C Women, be ready to be inspired and challenged with J. Lee Grady’s new book, Fearless Daughters of the Bible. The subtitle describes the book well: “What you can learn from 22 women who challenged tradition, fought injustice and dared to lead.” It’s packed with stories of women overcoming personal challenges and defying cultural norms to do God’s work. There are stories of women in the Bible, ranging from common names like Ruth, Esther and Mary Magdalene, to less told stories of the daughters of Caleb, Philip the Evangelist and the Apostle Paul. The author takes some liberty to guess the feelings and thoughts of the characters, so it definitely does not read like a traditional Bible story. There are also stories of women from the last century who are using their gifts to lead boldly in their places around the world. It stands against the modern day churches assumption that women should not be leaders in the church, and paints of picture of the many ways God used women to lead communities in the Bible. But interestingly, the book is written by a male pastor, not a woman. It challenges women to use their God-given gifts to lead, mentor, protect, forgive, and speak for God. Each chapter introduces a common hurdle that women must overcome in order to serve God whole-heartedly, such as fear, insecurity, healing from abuse… He suggests practical steps to grow stronger. It’s very well-written. It’s very inspiring. I think it is a great read for older teens and adult women. It would also be a great tool for a women’s Bible study. I would suggest reading a chapter a day, rather than trying to read straight through the text in a few long reading sessions. Disclosure: I received this book from Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for my honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Faye

    To be perfectly honest, not a book I would recommend. Fearless Daughters of the Bible is a book that had a good writing style, but was very much against my personal beliefs. This book talks alot about raising up women to be leaders in churches as pastors and in other prominent positions. The Bible firmly teaches that while women are equal and important parts of the church and family, He has specifically called men to lead in these areas. And while Mr. Grady had some interesting examples, I believ To be perfectly honest, not a book I would recommend. Fearless Daughters of the Bible is a book that had a good writing style, but was very much against my personal beliefs. This book talks alot about raising up women to be leaders in churches as pastors and in other prominent positions. The Bible firmly teaches that while women are equal and important parts of the church and family, He has specifically called men to lead in these areas. And while Mr. Grady had some interesting examples, I believe that women like Deborah were the exception, not the rule. So in my mind, Mr. Grady took his conclusions too far for a Conservative, Bible-Believing, Evangelical, like me, and ended up feeling like this was even a dangerous book to be reading. Overall, this was not a book that I would recommend, because quite honestly I felt that what Mr. Grady is doing with this book is dangerous, using the Bible in a way that goes beyond what is plainly written. While it had some nice insight into some of history's strongest and brave women the undertone beneath it all disturbed me. So for me this was a disappointing read. I received this book from the publisher in return for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    An excellent book. I may have said this before, but J Lee Grady does not simply state things - he backs them up with scripture, historical happenings, and personal experience. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has any question about the role of women in leadership and in the Church.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    Some parts were interesting, but I didn't really agree with the authors interepations in other parts of this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barb Irwin

    It was a refreshing look at the role of women in God's plan.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Fullington

    This book was so inspirational to me. It showed me that I have power in God and I can do anything. It also showed me that I'm not like just one of the women in the Bible he mentioned, but all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Lee Grady is sort of controversial. Mainly because of his progressive views on women that are a breath of fresh air after cultural reasoning for women's roles have somehow been branded on women without reasoning, and have made many women feel inadequate in who they are. While Grady does provide refreshing views he also doesn't take time to recognize what makes being a woman unique either that much, and much of the book feels like a Pentecostal sell. Grady explores the lives of 22 women from the B Lee Grady is sort of controversial. Mainly because of his progressive views on women that are a breath of fresh air after cultural reasoning for women's roles have somehow been branded on women without reasoning, and have made many women feel inadequate in who they are. While Grady does provide refreshing views he also doesn't take time to recognize what makes being a woman unique either that much, and much of the book feels like a Pentecostal sell. Grady explores the lives of 22 women from the Bible who were brave, and an inspiration for breaking the mold of what the general expectations of them were at the time to live out the plan God had for them. Beginning with Sarah, and including others such as Mary, the mother of Jesus, Deborah, Esther, and many others he provides a strong case that when God calls on them not any man can tell them the rules that restrict them because of their sex. Grady doesn't only use Biblical examples though, but also women from all times in history who fought over the hurtles of being a woman to fearlessly live for God. Overall, the point of Grady's book is great. If God has a plan for you to be something then no one, not even the cultural boundaries of man will stop you from doing that task even if it breaks norms. A lot of people like to take Paul's words of women not having authority over man as saying she can't preach, but yet many other verses that discuss a woman keeping her head covered during services seem to be ignored. Many people, even women, will have a problem with this part of this book. Women who have grown up being taught this will have a hard time letting go if it if they ever choose to further research these verses to find out the true intentions of them. Why is it we don't think it's important to not eat pork anymore, or send women to a tent during their menstrual cycle, but somehow still hold certain values like that? What makes one rule cultural and the others not? While I like this message about Grady there were a couple of things that just didn't have me too hyped over the book as a I hoped. The first being the almost forced Pentecostal views. He almost acts like if people are waving their hands around, or jumping around during worshiping then their form of worshiping God is wrong. There is nothing wrong with doing those things, but there is also nothing wrong with you if that doesn't happen to you. He also throws off on Calvinism, and sort of lumps all types of Calvinist into one. We're not all the same, nor all derive from the same branch of it. Also, while I agree with his views on women being leaders he almost seems to force it a bit. I think while there are women called to lead there are much fewer women who are. He seems to discount that while women and men are equal in God's eyes we aren't made the same. There is no amount of denying our biological makeup that will put men and women into being able to act alike. The hormonal and physical makeup of a man and a woman is very different and does determine a lot of our personalities. Also, I think Grady discounts that Paul didn't necessarily think men and women were interchangeable in roles. There is that whole verse about marriage roles that don't give them the same roles within that union. Grady never touches on this subject matter except in passing once. Another thing that was a bit of a peeve was the use of The Message, which is basically a paraphrased reading of the Bible. He refers to the original text, which is great, but the fact he wove in The Message made it difficult for me to determine what information I could trust as foundation, and what I couldn't. Any book that is trying to move along women as being just as intelligent, and capable of leading is a huge plus as it is something that Christianity still struggles with for some reason despite the low evidence that women's roles are more boundary ridden then man. It doesn't take much Bible reading to know that Miriam, Deborah, Priscilla, and many more would not have fit into our box of how we have stereotyped women into being only capable of leading women and children in Sunday school, and banishing them from sharing what God may be working through them to in a pulpit. Who is it us to determine what God has brought into one life as being their destined position in life? The fact this is very heavily watered in a certain denomination, and doesn't really discuss further passages that mention the roles of the women take it from being at the top level. Rating 4 of 5. This book was provided by Baker Publishing company in exchange for a review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sunflower

    "Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" " was one of those books that started off with a good premise, but as the reader goes through the book, itself, finds themselves lost more in a book that is bluntly argumentative and more social agenda filled, rather than presenting what appeared to be a look at 22 women from the Bible. It was disappointing and difficult to go through, ""Fearless Daughters of the Bible: "Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" " was one of those books that started off with a good premise, but as the reader goes through the book, itself, finds themselves lost more in a book that is bluntly argumentative and more social agenda filled, rather than presenting what appeared to be a look at 22 women from the Bible. It was disappointing and difficult to go through, ""Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" mostly because the book, rather than be objective, felt too much subjective. Despite its attempts to address the points that was shared in, "Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" didn't really seem to live up to the overall presentation that the book had shared with the reader. Instead, what the reader gets, is a book that has too much focus on modern social issues and ends up being more politically than really theological based; ""Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" loses the reader in a few places, where it becomes finger pointing and just loses the appeal of a book that had the potential to really showcase the strengths of the women who had faith in God and followed Him. I was very disappointed with, "Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" and felt instead of focusing on the actual 22 women in the Bible, seem to be more of a social agenda driven book. It was difficult to really finish, mostly because of the lack of focus, and the emphasis more on modern day examples and just the over all heavy handiness of how the topics were treated. The writing style was a bit heavy handed in different areas of the book, that lost me as a reader and there were a few areas where,"Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" was heavy handed on criticism about the church, followers of the faith and how the Bible ,instead of focusing on what was thought the book was about, "Fearless Daughters of the Bible", instead seem more of a book of criticism on topics, that as a reader, I felt really was not related to what the book, seem to be intended for, and should have been left for either an article or the subject of another book. In the end, "Fearless Daughters of the Bible: What You Can Learn from 22 Women Who Challenged Tradition, Fought Injustice and Dared to Lead" was a difficult book to review, mostly due to the disappointment at the end of the book, how the topics were present, some often feeling like the author, just goes off in a tangent, and in a lot of ways, the book also felt misleading, in that it seems to present one image of what the book was going for, but instead, presented another image that just falls into a questionable if not, too critical look at the church and how the Bible is presented that bears really no relation to what the book was presented to share with the reader.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    I love this book! Love it so much after reading Women, Slaves and the Gender Debate. It's not a theological book (it's more like an encouraging one), but it makes so much more sense than Women, Slaves and the Gender Debate (henceforth, "the other book") From the very start, the importance of women is affirmed. The book says "when you read the Bible, it is obvious that God often anoints women to be initiators." The book goes one to take about a varied bunch of women, including The Five Daughters o I love this book! Love it so much after reading Women, Slaves and the Gender Debate. It's not a theological book (it's more like an encouraging one), but it makes so much more sense than Women, Slaves and the Gender Debate (henceforth, "the other book") From the very start, the importance of women is affirmed. The book says "when you read the Bible, it is obvious that God often anoints women to be initiators." The book goes one to take about a varied bunch of women, including The Five Daughters of Zelophehad (the courage to challenge tradition), Miriam (the courage to lead in a man's world), Priscilla (the courage to mentor others) and many many others. There are 15 women/groups of women in total, so that's a lot of courage and a lot of encouraging. In addition, each chapter talks about various women that the author has met, proving that it's not only in the Bible that women was called to take charge and lead. There is this really strong contrast between America and the rest of the world (particularly China) in this book. The author talks about how in America, some Churches are debating things like whether women can lead worship, while in China, women are pastoring thousands of Churches each. What a huge difference! Because I believe that God gives his gifts as he sees fit, and not according to gender, I agree completely with this book. There's a Chinese saying which I don't know and can't be bothered to check, which goes like "Women hold up half the sky". There's really no reason for us to cower behind the guys when it comes to doing battle on God's behalf. In conclusion, this is an excellent book that everyone should read. You don't need to be a girl to appreciate the message of courage, and it's fully of people you should know about. Disclaimer: I got a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a free and honest review. First published at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  16. 5 out of 5

    Iola

    This study takes us through twenty-two Biblical women, from well-known figures such as Mary and Ruth, to lesser-known figures such as the five daughters of Zelophehad. He relates each of these Biblical women (or groups of women) to a specific issue, then compares them with Christian women today—and the results are not always in our favour: "But the message in both Victorian England and suburban America was that women should not attempt anything brave. They should stay indoors, out of the heat of This study takes us through twenty-two Biblical women, from well-known figures such as Mary and Ruth, to lesser-known figures such as the five daughters of Zelophehad. He relates each of these Biblical women (or groups of women) to a specific issue, then compares them with Christian women today—and the results are not always in our favour: "But the message in both Victorian England and suburban America was that women should not attempt anything brave. They should stay indoors, out of the heat of the sun, and out of trouble. They should let their men solve the world’s problems while they attend to details like folding linens and polishing silverware. Secular Americans do not think that way today, for the most part, but sadly many Christians do." There is a large branch of the evangelical church who believe that or something similar, and they are either going to be challenged or offended by a book like this. The author, a male, is a strong believer in the obligations of women to serve obediently God in whatever their calling, and he doesn’t believe women’s callings are limited to being stay-at-home moms. Amen. Notice I say ‘obligations’ not ‘rights’. We have no rights in God. But we do have an obligation to serve, to honour Jesus’s sacrifice with our obedience, a point Grady makes clearly. Oddly enough, some will respect Fearless Daughters of the Bible less because it is written by a man, and a man who clearly believes that women are called to serve, have an obligation to serve. Others, like me, respect it more because it’s written by a man. Recommended. Thanks to Chosen Books and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Linda Walters

    I've read a book or two about Women in the Bible and while they have been good; oh my, this one includes a few that I've never really looked at that close. Most of them have Hannah and Esther and Ruth but this one includes The 5 daughters Zelophehad (which years ago I just happened to run across). The first one that made me run to my Bible to look it up was Achsah, the daughter of Caleb. Please don't get the wrong idea; I really do read my Bible. How many of us have thought that the story of Est I've read a book or two about Women in the Bible and while they have been good; oh my, this one includes a few that I've never really looked at that close. Most of them have Hannah and Esther and Ruth but this one includes The 5 daughters Zelophehad (which years ago I just happened to run across). The first one that made me run to my Bible to look it up was Achsah, the daughter of Caleb. Please don't get the wrong idea; I really do read my Bible. How many of us have thought that the story of Esther was partially such a romantic story; you might want to re-think that a bit as you read what the author brings out about that. Included are stories of real life women as well. Just so many good insights; so I'm planning on making sure this book is available for some of the women in my church to take a look at. But to the honest, it's not just for women alone. I have been blessed enough to have a Pastor who saw through the eyes of Jesus and because of this encouraged women to be all they could be. To co-labor with men and the Spirit of the Lord. I received a free copy of this book from Chosen Books, a division of Baker Publishing Group, as part of their book review program, and I am under no obligation to write a positive review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    IrenesBookReviews

    This book will not go down as one of my favorites. I thought it was just going to be about women in the Bible. There are different women mentioned in this book, some you may have never heard of. I liked the idea the author was presenting that women can make a difference and take a stand. I gave this book 4/5 stars for a couple reasons. I thought the authors tone was too condescending. It felt like he was saying if you are not out doing this and that you are not serving the Lord enough. I think i This book will not go down as one of my favorites. I thought it was just going to be about women in the Bible. There are different women mentioned in this book, some you may have never heard of. I liked the idea the author was presenting that women can make a difference and take a stand. I gave this book 4/5 stars for a couple reasons. I thought the authors tone was too condescending. It felt like he was saying if you are not out doing this and that you are not serving the Lord enough. I think if this book had been written by a woman there would have been a better tone and not come across so preachy. Now remember that is just my opinion, you may absolutely love the book! I would recommend this to anyone looking for women to inspire them to be more like Christ in their service to the Lord. I would like to thank the publisher for the copy of this book I enjoyed reading. I gave an honest review based on my opinion of what I read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gina Hott

    In Fearless Women of the Bible the author gives us indisputable evidence of God’s plan for and use of women. He does this using not only Scriptural references, but also historical accounts and modern day examples. It’s so easy to follow and understand God’s path for women when reading Fearless Women of the Bible, you’ll wonder why anyone ever thought we wouldn’t be used for His purposes. More… Genre: Christian Non-Fiction Pages: 224 Grade: B Ages: 16+

  20. 4 out of 5

    Camiwar

    An amazing accident -- I really needed to read this book! It was refreshing to hear the author talk about how God used women in the Bible, not by default (which I now realize I believed based on my personal background), but by design. I feel energized and challenged to be more open to ways God may want to use me and would highly recommend this book to all Christian women!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melvina

    For me this was a disappointing read!!! Mr. Grady is using the Bible in a way that goes beyond what is plainly written. It did however have some nice insight into some of history's strongest and brave women. *Won on Goodreads*

  22. 5 out of 5

    Candy Shepard

    Loved this book! Inspiring and powerful!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Villeneuve-madge

    Fabulous Book!!! I am using it in my ladies group this year!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bea Burt

    Every woman should read this book especially christian women.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bonne Lynn

    Several mentions of charismatic, over evangelical idea. eh.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J

    Es uno de esos libros que te hacen recordar para qué fuiste llamada y tu lugar en el Reino de Dios. Estoy convencida de que es un libro obligatorio para cada creyente.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lydia

    My Women's Bible Study group is reading this. One chapter per meeting. So far, it has been a good study.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathy R. Burke

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Householder

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