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Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport

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This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain. The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archiv This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain. The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archival photographs, paintings of pre-war Nazi Germany by artist, Hans Jackson, and original art by the Kinder commemorating their rescue.


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This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain. The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archiv This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain. The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archival photographs, paintings of pre-war Nazi Germany by artist, Hans Jackson, and original art by the Kinder commemorating their rescue.

30 review for Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport

  1. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    I was delighted when I rec'd. word from Librarything.com that I would obtain this book as an Early Review copy. Having read many books about the Kindertransport, it is always interesting to read another that can shed more information and insight into the miraculous rescue of 10,000 Jewish children. The author did an incredible job on many levels, primarily on bringing the facts and feelings to the story of the Kindertransport. The beauty is in the way in which the author simplistically told the f I was delighted when I rec'd. word from Librarything.com that I would obtain this book as an Early Review copy. Having read many books about the Kindertransport, it is always interesting to read another that can shed more information and insight into the miraculous rescue of 10,000 Jewish children. The author did an incredible job on many levels, primarily on bringing the facts and feelings to the story of the Kindertransport. The beauty is in the way in which the author simplistically told the facts and thus rendered the tale ever much more poignant and real. As Hitler and his followers increasingly became more intent on their goal of extermination of all groups they deeded unfit, Jewish parents became ever more afraid for themselves and their children. At a time when Jewish people were despairing, many nations turned their back on their plight. Few countries who could assist, never did. In July of 1938 FDR was instrumental in calling a conference consisting of 32 countries to discuss the ever invasive and appalling actions of the Nazi's and their treatment of Jews. And, sadly talk is about all that resulted from this meeting. In the end, only one country -- brave England -- put actions into words. The United States was attempting to recover from a great depression. Still England who was destined to enter the war, incredibly saved 10,000 children. All nations except England turned their back on the Jews. Shame! Shame! Shame!!! After the night of broken glass, when Nazis deliberately burned Synagogues, killed Jews and destroyed their place of business, it was ever so clear that the Nazis were more active, more intent and ever more invasive. Britain , Jewish leaders, Quakers and Christians designed a workable plan to transport Jewish children to England. As a parent and grandparent, I cannot fathom the huge sacrifice made in placing my child in the hands of strangers, praying for the safe passage, while knowing there was a chance that you might never see that child again. Deborah Hodge shows the impact, the fear, and the adjustment of eight children rescued through the Kindertransport. Through a series of stories and art work, the drama becomes alive and powerful. Their stories are heartbreaking and heart wrenching and yet hopeful. Each person was blessed twice by their parents, first in giving life at birth and then secondly in making the sacrifice to transport them to another life. There were many heros who helped to rescue these children. First and foremost, hats off to Britain!!! Nicholas Winston, a 29 year old British stockbroker rescued 699 Jewish children: http://www.powerofgood.net/story.php Norbert Wollheim a 25 year old Jewish man helped with the Kindertransport in Berlin. Sadly, he and his family were sent to Auschwitz. He was the only remaining person who did not die. http://www.wollheim-memorial.de/en/al... Geertruida (Truus) Wijsmuller-Meijer, a Jewish social worker worked tirelessly to help arrange the transportation out of Germany and into England. As the author notes, she miraculously led Jewish children from an Amsterdam orphanage and enabled them to rush to the last ship leaving England. This brave deed was done as Holland was falling to the Nazis. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G2-25913... I did not know of the three people listed above and I thank the author for telling their incredible tales of courage, love, fortitude and sacrifice. This Kindertransport sculpture can be found at the Liverpool Street station in London. Created by Frank Meisler, it is a tribute to Britain and a tribute to courage, hope, compassion and faith. http://www.frank-meisler.com/CityScul... I highly recommend this book! FIVE STARS

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    It's emotional to read a story about hundreds of husbands and wives who knew the only way to save their Jewish children was to put them on trains and get them out without them. Known as Kindertransport, men and women, especially those that were Quakers, risked their lives and put their reputations on the line to convince the Nazis to let the children go. Then they exhaustively worked to find them hostels, homes, and orphanages to keep them safe until their hopeful reunion with family. Sadly many It's emotional to read a story about hundreds of husbands and wives who knew the only way to save their Jewish children was to put them on trains and get them out without them. Known as Kindertransport, men and women, especially those that were Quakers, risked their lives and put their reputations on the line to convince the Nazis to let the children go. Then they exhaustively worked to find them hostels, homes, and orphanages to keep them safe until their hopeful reunion with family. Sadly many (as they say, two-thirds) didn't get to reunite ever with family, but some did. Even those that helped in the rescue were greatly rewarded. I couldn't help but be moved by one of the men, Nicholas Winton, who survived the Holocaust after rescuing children, and lived to 100 years old. The narrative nonfiction is short and sweet, interspersed with quotes from eight girls and boys who were transported, illustrations and actual photographs from the time period. Imagine the maturity these kids needed to all be crowded on to trains with only a few adults for supervision to survive. There are photos of boys playing the violin for other kids on the train or sitting and reading. It's very Anne Frank. A different perspective on the Holocaust, though while sad, much more uplifting to see the great side of humanity, with the words "Whoever saves one life saves the world entire" echoing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Swift

    As a librarian I get to read many books and this is one of them. And it should actually be 3.5 stars. A quick summary. Before Hitler invaded Poland and started WWII, Jewish children were evacuated from Germany to surrounding countries and England. This book highlights some of the stories from the children who were part of that movement. Overall I enjoyed this book. Probably my favorite aspect is it is a happy tale about a topic in history that can get very depressing. There are its sad moments bu As a librarian I get to read many books and this is one of them. And it should actually be 3.5 stars. A quick summary. Before Hitler invaded Poland and started WWII, Jewish children were evacuated from Germany to surrounding countries and England. This book highlights some of the stories from the children who were part of that movement. Overall I enjoyed this book. Probably my favorite aspect is it is a happy tale about a topic in history that can get very depressing. There are its sad moments but those are few and far between. For this reason I would recommend it being used to lighten the mood during a high school, or even middle school, history lesson. Also this book is a great introduction to a topic most people don't even know happened. For that reason alone I would get this book and add it to any library. The book did have a few faults. To me there was not enough information about the children and their experiences, then again I did get a degree in History so I am biased in that regard. Another downside (or upside to some) is it is a short book, once again going back to the brief amount of information. But the good outweighs the bad. There a photographs and artwork done by survivors, a timeline of major events in WWII included and a list of other sources to look for more information. The book also talks about what happened to the children directly after the war and all the way through to what the now adults are doing today. All in all, I would add this book to any library and if it is used in the classroom setting, couple it with some of the books listed in the back to balance out the depressing topic of the Jewish plight in WWII.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    The people who work tirelessly to help others are true heroes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tammy M

    1) Is It Night or Day? Fern Schumer Chapman, 2010 2) I would start by using a K-W-L chart of World War II, I would want to find out what the children knew, what they would want to find out and what they want to learn. I found several texts that would be awesome supporting texts as they tell many true stories of the children who needed to leave their parents to find a home elsewhere, and how it affected them as they grew. Is It Night or Day? Describes the author’s grandmother whose parents felt th 1) Is It Night or Day? Fern Schumer Chapman, 2010 2) I would start by using a K-W-L chart of World War II, I would want to find out what the children knew, what they would want to find out and what they want to learn. I found several texts that would be awesome supporting texts as they tell many true stories of the children who needed to leave their parents to find a home elsewhere, and how it affected them as they grew. Is It Night or Day? Describes the author’s grandmother whose parents felt the times changing, they arranged for their eldest daughter, Betty to go to the United States, and found a great home. They welcomed her with open arms. Her father then started to work on finding transportation for the youngest daughter, always with the assurance that they would join both daughters in the US. As the time goes one, you learn that the border is starting to close in Germany and it is getting harder to arrange for visa’s and transportation papers as it gets closer to the start of the war. Tiddy, (Edith), is to stay with her Aunt and Uncle, we find out how her aunt controls the house and rules. She expects her to clean as a maid, and to carry groceries every day after school. Edith starts school because of the language barrier in first grade with those classmates making fun of her. As she grasps the language quickly, she moves up from grade to grade. One of her classmates tries to become friends, and even goes to her apartment, however her aunt doesn’t allow her to go to the other gals home. Her cousin had a 16th birthday party, and she was asked not to attend, she looked forward to attending her first baseball game, a sport both she and her uncle enjoy. Since the game was on a Thursday, there was no charge for her ticket. She had been earning money to send to her parents so that they could join her in America. After returning home, she noticed the apartment had changed. They decorations and plates had been used, however no one cleaned up. Her aunt told her to clean up since she had returned home. This was the first time that she stood up for herself. Both Edith’s and Betty’s relationship is greatly damaged since Betty had left. She had a very accepting family and whose daughter thought of Betty as a sister. This both confused and frustrated Edith, since she no longer had her family or her family friend to communicate with. Her uncle did try to raise money as well through the synagogue, and find a job for his younger brother, however they would not be able to complete the task. In the end you find out what happens to her family, I felt it truly described the emotions of what the children went through with leaving their homes, sometimes being told they were going on vacation, or to the zoo. 3) They used a combination of resources, description, chronological sequence, cause and effect, and problem and solution. 4) I would use a K-W-L chart when first discussing with the children. I want to find out what they know, what they want to know and what they want to learn. There are also several websites that I would use as we would go along.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Valerie McEnroe

    This is a short book about the year 1939 when 10,000 Jewish children were transported out of Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Austria through the kindness of strangers. In order for this to happen, parents had to let their children go, hoping they would see them again one day. Heartbreaking. The trains first arrived in Holland, but once Holland fell to Nazi occupation, they had to be transported out again by ship to England. I can't help feeling proud of the British people who where the only ones to This is a short book about the year 1939 when 10,000 Jewish children were transported out of Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Austria through the kindness of strangers. In order for this to happen, parents had to let their children go, hoping they would see them again one day. Heartbreaking. The trains first arrived in Holland, but once Holland fell to Nazi occupation, they had to be transported out again by ship to England. I can't help feeling proud of the British people who where the only ones to take these children. Most of these children never saw their parents again. The book is short (I wish it were longer), but I really enjoyed it, especially the artwork by Hans Jackson, photos of Memory quilt squares, photographs of the children, and quotes from eight adults who lived the experience.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Orly12

    Rescuing the Children is a non-fiction book explaining the story of the Kindertransport during the Holocaust. Non-fiction books are always based on real facts or events, and are typically very informative, which include various subjects. Rescuing the Children is a very educational book about how the Kindertransport worked, through the views of many of the "Kinder" (kids), who rode on the Kindertransport more than 70 years ago. It explains how the kids had to go through a process of getting on th Rescuing the Children is a non-fiction book explaining the story of the Kindertransport during the Holocaust. Non-fiction books are always based on real facts or events, and are typically very informative, which include various subjects. Rescuing the Children is a very educational book about how the Kindertransport worked, through the views of many of the "Kinder" (kids), who rode on the Kindertransport more than 70 years ago. It explains how the kids had to go through a process of getting on the Kindertransport and the heartbreaking stories of the children leaving their families. The book also includes many pictures as well as pre-war and post-war information. The book is structured in small chapters of two to three pages, going in chronological order, with section headings, describing each mini chapter. There are also pictures and diagrams to help explain the information, as well as an index and table of contents. Overall, this was an outstanding book. I think the way Deborah Hodge organized this book was very effective, because between the pictures, headings, and timelines, you always knew where you were. I think it was a very interesting and grasping book to read! Deborah Hodge seemed very educated on the Kindertransport. In this book, people can gain an understanding of the time when the Kindertransport took place, learn more about the Holocaust, and understand how harsh and saddening the stories of the children were. I really thought the book was extremely well-written and couldn't have been better. When reading non-fiction, I would suggest to keep an open mind on the subject and don't feel overwhelmed if there is too much information, you can read at whatever pace you want. I would suggest this book to people interested in the Holocaust and the Kindertransport, because it really gives you an understanding of these children’s life experiences. I would rate this 5 stars, as it was truly an exemplary book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    1. Fiction Twin Text Book: My Family for the War, Author: Anne Voorhoere, Copyright: 2012 2. Rationale: I selected these two books because our 6th graders study Europe and the Holocaust. They have read books like the Diary of Anne Frank, Night, The boy in the Striped Pajamas. The stories of the Kindertransport offer a story of hope that there are people in the world willing to do the right thing. This is a theme that is also addressed with intermediate and middle school aged students. 3. Identify 1. Fiction Twin Text Book: My Family for the War, Author: Anne Voorhoere, Copyright: 2012 2. Rationale: I selected these two books because our 6th graders study Europe and the Holocaust. They have read books like the Diary of Anne Frank, Night, The boy in the Striped Pajamas. The stories of the Kindertransport offer a story of hope that there are people in the world willing to do the right thing. This is a theme that is also addressed with intermediate and middle school aged students. 3. Identify the text structure & strategy: This book uses a table of contents to list each chapter. Photographs are in black and white and the majority of the photographs have captions. There is a timeline of events at the back of the book in addition to a glossary of important terms used throughout the book. The book also has Headings and subheadings, appendix and references. The text structure used in the book is mostly description based and question/answer. Each chapter begins with a description and is followed by real life accounts from survivors of the Kindertransport. When teaching this book I would use the strategy of webbing and start with the Main Idea - Kindertransport and list words that describe what was learned as we read. 4. (2012, November 1). School Library Journal. http://www.booksinprint.com.leo.lib.u...#

  9. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    "...The men and women who organized and ran the Kindertransport were unbelievably brave and tenacious, and thanks to their efforts, thousands of children were relocated to safety before the war really began...Hodge peppers the book with anecdotes about the Kindertransport experience from eight different people who were child refugees through this program... ...The brevity of the book along with the overall tone leads me to believe that Rescuing the Children is really meant for roughly middle-grad "...The men and women who organized and ran the Kindertransport were unbelievably brave and tenacious, and thanks to their efforts, thousands of children were relocated to safety before the war really began...Hodge peppers the book with anecdotes about the Kindertransport experience from eight different people who were child refugees through this program... ...The brevity of the book along with the overall tone leads me to believe that Rescuing the Children is really meant for roughly middle-grade children (well, that and the fact that Hodge is a children's author), but the content is not watered-down to the point where the message would be lost to older readers. As an adult, I know I got a lot out of reading this, and although it's not the kind of book I'd use as a source on an academic paper, I would certainly recommend it as an excellent jumping-off point for anyone interested in learning about this topic in particular or about the Holocaust and World War II in general." For full review, please visit me at Here Be Bookwyrms on Blogger: http://herebebookwyrms.blogspot.com/2...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth Withers

    I read this as a review copy. Excellent book! Written for younger audiences, this book does a wonderful job of telling the story of the Kindertransport, the movement that rescued thousands of Jewish children from the advancing Nazi threat. I especially like how the author has made the information more personal by featuring statements from eight different people. In the end, we even get to see how their lives played out as they grew to adulthood. The pictures are captivating and guaranteed to cap I read this as a review copy. Excellent book! Written for younger audiences, this book does a wonderful job of telling the story of the Kindertransport, the movement that rescued thousands of Jewish children from the advancing Nazi threat. I especially like how the author has made the information more personal by featuring statements from eight different people. In the end, we even get to see how their lives played out as they grew to adulthood. The pictures are captivating and guaranteed to capture the interest of youngsters. A brief overview of WWII and a timeline are given also, plus vocabulary. I learned a good bit while reading this book, and I know that school children who read this will learn also.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lenise Jones

    Hodge, Deborah (2012). Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport Toronto: Tundra Books. ALA Booklist Star Review Dec 1 2012 Nonfiction/Informational Junior Book Project This non-fiction book tells the story of how 10,000 Jewish Children were saved from certain death by the Nazis by transporting them by train, plane and ship to Holland and Britain. The author used the artwork of one of the Kinder survivors and photographs to give great imagery to the readers. If a teacher would like the Hodge, Deborah (2012). Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport Toronto: Tundra Books. ALA Booklist Star Review Dec 1 2012 Nonfiction/Informational Junior Book Project This non-fiction book tells the story of how 10,000 Jewish Children were saved from certain death by the Nazis by transporting them by train, plane and ship to Holland and Britain. The author used the artwork of one of the Kinder survivors and photographs to give great imagery to the readers. If a teacher would like the students to get a true understanding of what life was like for children during WWII Nazi Germany, then this book is an excellent choice. The author also explains certain words that students may not know the meaning of, which is great for expanding students’ vocabulary.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alyson

    I was happy to stumble upon this book while working in the junior high library recently. It isn't often you find a happy WWII story. I had never heard of the kindertransport and that is why it caught my eye. This book gives information about 10,000 Jewish children, ages a few months old to age 18, whose parent's sent them to England to live with others before the start of war. It talked about the pain and difficulty those parents must have faced sending their children off to unknown strangers. I I was happy to stumble upon this book while working in the junior high library recently. It isn't often you find a happy WWII story. I had never heard of the kindertransport and that is why it caught my eye. This book gives information about 10,000 Jewish children, ages a few months old to age 18, whose parent's sent them to England to live with others before the start of war. It talked about the pain and difficulty those parents must have faced sending their children off to unknown strangers. It also mentioned how these families didn't expect it to be for long and assumed they would be together soon. That, of course, didn't happen and about 2/3 of these children never saw their family or a living relative again. Their parents literally saved them. I'm fascinated by this event now.

  13. 5 out of 5

    AnnieM

    What parent in any time would have the strength to put their child on a train send them to another country to be raised by strangers? Then they had to hope that they would one day meet again. Hodge tells the known story of the Kindertransport, but uses the stories of the children who rode on the train to really explain what it was like. Hitler is hopefully a one of a kind evil. History has proven over the centuries he is not. Listen to the stories of these people and realize what a small bit of ki What parent in any time would have the strength to put their child on a train send them to another country to be raised by strangers? Then they had to hope that they would one day meet again. Hodge tells the known story of the Kindertransport, but uses the stories of the children who rode on the train to really explain what it was like. Hitler is hopefully a one of a kind evil. History has proven over the centuries he is not. Listen to the stories of these people and realize what a small bit of kindness can change the future of not only one person, but a whole culture. Excellent layout. Perfect balance of illustrations and text. Great use of white space.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Schwartz

    An account of the Kindertransport, a rescue effort, 1938-1940, to bring Jewish children under the age of seventeen to England. The book is detailed, yet appropriate for older children. Profiles of children who were rescued personalize the experience. The author emphasizes that the parents, fearing that they would never see their children again, wanted to give their children the chance of freedom. Includes a glossary, map, timeline, and bibliography. This book should be required reading in any cl An account of the Kindertransport, a rescue effort, 1938-1940, to bring Jewish children under the age of seventeen to England. The book is detailed, yet appropriate for older children. Profiles of children who were rescued personalize the experience. The author emphasizes that the parents, fearing that they would never see their children again, wanted to give their children the chance of freedom. Includes a glossary, map, timeline, and bibliography. This book should be required reading in any class (Jewish or secular), grades 7-12, studying the Holocaust.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kifflie

    The Kindertransport saved thousands of Jewish children from the Nazis. This book is a fine introduction to the subject of the Holocaust for children. There are plenty of pictures, anecdotes from actual survivors, and simple but clear text. I especially liked the artwork from survivor Hans Jackson.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    I liked this book and thought it gave a decent amount of knowledge of the Kindertransport which is something I didn't know a lot about. This book is written for a young adult reader and I think it is perfect for that age. I liked this book because it gave me a quick background and now I can move forward and find more in depth reading on this topic if I would like. I liked this book and thought it gave a decent amount of knowledge of the Kindertransport which is something I didn't know a lot about. This book is written for a young adult reader and I think it is perfect for that age. I liked this book because it gave me a quick background and now I can move forward and find more in depth reading on this topic if I would like.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Blum

    Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction Series: NO Awards: ? Strengths: Real life testimonials from children, now adults, timeline, artifacts Concerns: NONE Any special connections to curriculum or student interests: This book would fit perfect with readings/writing about the Holacaust.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jamantea

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a really inspiring story about how people rescued Jewish children during the holocaust by taking them from Germany to holland on trains and ferries to foster homes and boarding schools. It was really cool how the author told the main story but inserted little clips of the stories of eight girls and boys along the way. I would defiantly read this again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I like that this book, which is aimed at a juvenile audience, provided a very personal account of the Holocaust. There were plenty of pictures and primary source accounts of what the children of the kindertransport experienced. There are some great resources listed in the book for some follow up reading and I think teachers presenting a unit on the Holocaust would find this material helpful.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jessicadebiasio

    This book really touched my heart. I really enjoy reading about WWII, and this book was perfect for me. I got a chance to read about the different events that happened and I didn't even know that those events happened. I loved it how they had the people who were part of the kinder transport talk about their experiences. All the paintings made my experience reading the book even better. This book really touched my heart. I really enjoy reading about WWII, and this book was perfect for me. I got a chance to read about the different events that happened and I didn't even know that those events happened. I loved it how they had the people who were part of the kinder transport talk about their experiences. All the paintings made my experience reading the book even better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    This is a very informative book about the Kinderstransport. Definitely, a book that would be appropriate for younger learners researching this topic and for struggling readers. The book also contains photos and quotes from people who were in the Kinderstransport, so this book could also be used by older students as a resource.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Great use of primary source material including the voices of the rescued children and great photographs but uneven in terms of who the book is for - seemed to be generalizing so as not to be too disturbing and was a little sketchy - couple of quite problematic errors in the glossary

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    This is book is well written for upper elementary/early middle school readers to learn about this topic. I liked how the author focused on several survivors and told their stories in a personal way using their letters and memories. A part of the past we should not forget.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    This was a very short work of nonfiction. I really liked the personal stories of children taken from Germany during World War II. Those first hand accounts were amazing and extremely heartbreaking. This would be a perfect read for research or for anyone who is interested in World War II.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla Lewis

    I thought this book was really interesting. I liked that it showed the kids little and as a grownup. I also liked the chapter getting ready and that there was little story's in the book. After all I really liked this book. I thought this book was really interesting. I liked that it showed the kids little and as a grownup. I also liked the chapter getting ready and that there was little story's in the book. After all I really liked this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Super fascinating; I'm planning on reading more about the Kindertransport for sure. The book is well done, but something is missing as far as getting kids interested. As an adult I enjoyed it, but I'm not sure a third grader would be sucked in to the story. Super fascinating; I'm planning on reading more about the Kindertransport for sure. The book is well done, but something is missing as far as getting kids interested. As an adult I enjoyed it, but I'm not sure a third grader would be sucked in to the story.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    This book was an excellent resource; and beautifully told. I am grateful to have received this as a First Reads giveaway!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Great introduction to The Kindertransport. I'm interested in learning more about it! Great bibliography in the back of the book to go from! Great introduction to The Kindertransport. I'm interested in learning more about it! Great bibliography in the back of the book to go from!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Very well written with lots of quotes from personal experiences and photographs.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristenyque

    Although it is a children's non-fiction book anyone can learn from this informative but empathetic book. The personal stories make the narrative memorable. Although it is a children's non-fiction book anyone can learn from this informative but empathetic book. The personal stories make the narrative memorable.

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