Hot Best Seller

The Future Is Not Ours: New Latin American Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

The Future Is Not Ours brings together twenty-three Latin American writers who were born between 1970 and 1980. The anthology offers an exciting overview of contemporary Spanish-language literature and introduces a generation of writers who came of age in the time of military dictatorships, witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of the Cold War, the birth of the In The Future Is Not Ours brings together twenty-three Latin American writers who were born between 1970 and 1980. The anthology offers an exciting overview of contemporary Spanish-language literature and introduces a generation of writers who came of age in the time of military dictatorships, witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of the Cold War, the birth of the Internet, the murders of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, and the September 11th attacks in New York City. The anthology features: Oliverio Coelho, Federico Falco, and Samanta Schweblin (Argentina); Giovanna Rivero (Bolivia); Santiago Nazarian (Brasil); Juan Gabriel Vásquez and Antonio Ungar (Colombia); Ena Lucía Portela (Cuba); Lina Meruane, Andrea Jeftanovic, and Alejandro Zambra (Chile); Ronald Flores (Guatemala); Tryno Maldonado and Antonio Ortuño (México); María del Carmen Pérez Cuadra (Nicaragua); Carlos Wynter Melo (Panama); Daniel Alarcón and Santiago Roncagliolo (Peru); Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro (Puerto Rico); Ariadna Vásquez (Dominican Republic); Ignacio Alcuri and Inés Bortagaray (Uruguay); and Slavko Zupcic (Venezuela).


Compare

The Future Is Not Ours brings together twenty-three Latin American writers who were born between 1970 and 1980. The anthology offers an exciting overview of contemporary Spanish-language literature and introduces a generation of writers who came of age in the time of military dictatorships, witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of the Cold War, the birth of the In The Future Is Not Ours brings together twenty-three Latin American writers who were born between 1970 and 1980. The anthology offers an exciting overview of contemporary Spanish-language literature and introduces a generation of writers who came of age in the time of military dictatorships, witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of the Cold War, the birth of the Internet, the murders of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, and the September 11th attacks in New York City. The anthology features: Oliverio Coelho, Federico Falco, and Samanta Schweblin (Argentina); Giovanna Rivero (Bolivia); Santiago Nazarian (Brasil); Juan Gabriel Vásquez and Antonio Ungar (Colombia); Ena Lucía Portela (Cuba); Lina Meruane, Andrea Jeftanovic, and Alejandro Zambra (Chile); Ronald Flores (Guatemala); Tryno Maldonado and Antonio Ortuño (México); María del Carmen Pérez Cuadra (Nicaragua); Carlos Wynter Melo (Panama); Daniel Alarcón and Santiago Roncagliolo (Peru); Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro (Puerto Rico); Ariadna Vásquez (Dominican Republic); Ignacio Alcuri and Inés Bortagaray (Uruguay); and Slavko Zupcic (Venezuela).

30 review for The Future Is Not Ours: New Latin American Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    jeremy

    the future is not ours collects twenty-three short stories from writers throughout latin america, all of whom were born in the decade between 1970 and 1980. begun initially as a "free electronic anthology" in 2007 (featuring some sixty-three authors: el futuro no es nuestro), a shorter, alternate version with different stories found its way into print two years later and was subsequently published on three continents. this english edition of the future is not ours offers nineteen of the twenty s the future is not ours collects twenty-three short stories from writers throughout latin america, all of whom were born in the decade between 1970 and 1980. begun initially as a "free electronic anthology" in 2007 (featuring some sixty-three authors: el futuro no es nuestro), a shorter, alternate version with different stories found its way into print two years later and was subsequently published on three continents. this english edition of the future is not ours offers nineteen of the twenty short stories that appeared in the original print edition, plus an additional three selected specifically for this collection, and a replacement for one already featured elsewhere in english. of the twenty-three authors presented (representing fifteen countries in all), six of them also had stories selected for granta's "best of young spanish language novelists" issue (#113) and nine were named to the prestigious bogotá 39 list at the 2007 hay festival. diego trelles paz, preuvian novelist and short story writer served as the anthology's editor (one of his stories, "sección surrealista en el harry ransom center," appeared in the original digital collection) and authored an illuminating prologue about previous latin american anthologies and the current direction of latin american literary themes and forms. while many of the twenty-three stories in the future is not ours are too short to offer but a tantalizing glimpse, it is evident there is quite a bit of talent to be found throughout the younger generation of latin america letters. some of the included authors already have works available in english translation, and, undoubtedly, more are sure to follow. if there is a measure to be found within this anthology (as well as in the aforementioned granta), it is surely that a wealth of exciting, new fiction awaits english readers from one of the globe's most intriguing and consistently imaginative literary cultures. amongst the more notable stories found in the future is not ours are: *federico falco (argentina) "fifteen flowers" *ena lucía portela (cuba) "hurricane" *andrea jeftanovic (chile) "family tree" *ronald flores (guatemala) "any old story" *tryno maldonado (mexico) "variations on a theme by murakami and tsao hsueh-chin" *antonio ortuño (mexico) "pseudoephedrine" *daniel alarcón (peru) "lima, peru, july 28, 1979" *santiago roncagliolo (peru) "a desert full of water" *yolanda arroyo pizarro (puerto rico) "pillage" *ignacio alcuri (uruguay) "chicken soup" all of the stories in the future is not ours were translated by janet hendrickson

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul M.

    This anthology of current Latin American authors is, like most anthologies, something of a mixed bag. And, since like a lot of anthologies, this took me quite a while to get through, especially since the stories are organized alphabetically by author's country, so there isn't much of a flow between stories. Most of my favorite stories were by authors I knew about (Juan Gabriel Vasquez and Daniel Alarcon, for example), but there were also some surprises, such as the delightfully strange stories " This anthology of current Latin American authors is, like most anthologies, something of a mixed bag. And, since like a lot of anthologies, this took me quite a while to get through, especially since the stories are organized alphabetically by author's country, so there isn't much of a flow between stories. Most of my favorite stories were by authors I knew about (Juan Gabriel Vasquez and Daniel Alarcon, for example), but there were also some surprises, such as the delightfully strange stories "On the Steppe" and "Chicken Soup." However, there were also a few I wish I could have skipped, which dealt with some pretty harsh subject matter that left me feeling pretty disgusted (which, in these cases, I think was the goal, but I guess I have a low tolerance for such things). On the bright side, I will be looking for more from some of these authors, which I think was the goal. Note: This was my first time reading something this long translated from Spanish to English, at least since I learned Spanish. I can't hold it against the book, but I couldn't stop trying to guess the authors' original words. Luckily, for the curious, you can google the book's title, and find all the stories collected in their original Spanish: http://www.piedepagina.com/redux/cate...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Juan Almonacid

    Buena recopilación de narrativa latinoamericana, voces disparejas, algunos temas recurrentes, visiones distintas. -"Se dice que los meridianos son líneas que dividen al mundo por mitades, decía Tano y Blanquita Calzolari asentía. Se dice que las dos mitades son iguales y la línea que hace la división es una línea finita, finita, que no se puede ver, decía Tano y Blanquita Calzolari asentía. Se dice que los paralelos son las mismas líneas pero puestas al revés. Se dice que si se cambia de hemisfer Buena recopilación de narrativa latinoamericana, voces disparejas, algunos temas recurrentes, visiones distintas. -"Se dice que los meridianos son líneas que dividen al mundo por mitades, decía Tano y Blanquita Calzolari asentía. Se dice que las dos mitades son iguales y la línea que hace la división es una línea finita, finita, que no se puede ver, decía Tano y Blanquita Calzolari asentía. Se dice que los paralelos son las mismas líneas pero puestas al revés. Se dice que si se cambia de hemisferio y se pasa arriba de un meridiano o un paralelo a uno le da un escalofrío por la espalda. Blanquita Calzolari levantó la vista, los ojos de pronto atentos." -"..Fata me confesó que de chico creía que las palomas del cementerio eran Espíritus Santos y se iba a cazarlas con la gomera, llenaba una bolsa de Espíritus Santos muertos y las tiraba en el patio del cura." 15 flores- Federico Falco - "Un dolor de amor. Quién no lo sabe. Un dolor de amor en las yemas de los dedos. Al contacto se pudrían las manzanas. Todo iba pudriéndose. MTV aullaba por esa época, pero eso no terminaba de darle sentido a nada...estrenaba Frankestein...yo apretaba rewind para ver mil veces el corazón palpitando en la mano del monstruo huérfano. El tórax roto, una enorme herida de guerra. Me desprendí de la blusa para hacer lo mismo: romper la piel del pecho y arrancarme el corazón, quizá comérmelo y eructar estruendosamente..." -"Si alguien no te ama, puedes soplar los segundos como burbujas de detergente, disparar las burbujas por toda tu existencia. Nada va a lastimarte, las burbujas no te hieren, explotan silenciosas y apenas humedecen las superficies." Camas gemelas - Giovanna Rivero -La nitidez de las cosas a las que les llega el sol. Por ahora pienso en el follaje, en esta vida bajo los árboles, contando las hojas perennes, acariciando las raíces añosas, cortando madera para el invierno. Presagiando cuándo las ramas que afirman este tronco dejarán que se quiebre en dos. árbol genealógico - Andrea Jeftanovic -Los días pasan sin que ninguno se entere de que no soy ni buena ni mala, ni dulce ni salada, sólo soy yo, el compás de mi corazón, el brillo de mi piel, el color del cabello que va desapareciendo. -Maria del carmen Perez cuadra - Quería matarlo. Corrí con la crueldad en el pecho, como una droga que me empujaba...El pobre perro se detuvo en la acera de enfrente y se volteó a mirarme, apenas a unos cuantos metros de distancia, agitado, con la cabeza inclinada hacia un lado, mirándome intrigado, una mirada que yo ya había visto antes en mi familia, en mis amigos, o incluso en las mujeres que tuvieron la desgracia de enamorarse de mi: la mirada de quienes esperaban grandes cosas de mí y al final terminaron decepcionados. -Tras unos segundos de silencio, él empieza a temblar ligeramente. Ella piensa que va a estallar de cólera y está preparada para recibir el estallido. El temblor de Martín se hace cada vez más intenso hasta que no puede más y, por primera vez en el día, suelta una carcajada, no un rebuzno sordo...sino una risa fuerte, limpia, que a Vania la reconforta como si le entrase agua caliente al ánimo. Ella se ríe también. -Se ha quedado esperando sobre una roca salada en Naxos, Sus brazos se han ido alargando, por eso abraza su espalda, o viceversa. La abraza y sus ojos tienen ojeras profundas, huecos oscuros de los que parece surgir la mirada de otra mujer que jamás será ella. Sus omoplatos parecen alas, y en su cabello está enredado el hilo, el hilo maldito que le recuerda, le dice, no tejer, no volver a tejer porque esperar sin concentrarse en esperar es precisamente lo que ella no debe hacer. Debe esperar así, acongojada, cubierta por los brazos y las piernas, con la piel seca de cansancio, con los ojos muertos y una saliva tatuada en el vértice de los labios. Mirar, mirar. Sólo así es la espera y no se puede tejer, no se puede respirar muy fuerte porque en un hálito de aire se muere un instante delicioso donde él podría venir a buscarla. Su destino ya no depende de los Dioses, pero ella no ha dejado de creer en ellos.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro Teruel

    Según explica en su prólogo el compilador, el escritor peruano Diego Trelles Paz, "...el cinismo, la indiferencia y el individualismo están presentes, directa u oblicuamente, en mucha de la producción de estos autores" Para Trelles Paz los "motivos medulares" de estos cuentos y de la tradición literaria latinoamericana son la sexualidad y "las diferentes manifestaciones de la violencia, tanto en las relaciones interpersonales como a partir del difícil proceso de convivencia cultural, social y po Según explica en su prólogo el compilador, el escritor peruano Diego Trelles Paz, "...el cinismo, la indiferencia y el individualismo están presentes, directa u oblicuamente, en mucha de la producción de estos autores" Para Trelles Paz los "motivos medulares" de estos cuentos y de la tradición literaria latinoamericana son la sexualidad y "las diferentes manifestaciones de la violencia, tanto en las relaciones interpersonales como a partir del difícil proceso de convivencia cultural, social y político de naciones altamente desiguales." Es fácil armar una antología entre estos dos ejes de la cultura pop del siglo XX y XXI y tentador resuscitar los viejos y cansados esquemas de la crítica izquierdista que asoma Trelles Paz sin destaparlos. La verdad es que entre Eros y Tanatos se puede ubicar una antología de cualquier siglo, diría, acertadamente, Freud. ¿Qué hay de específicamente latinoamericano del siglo XXI en esta colección? En el cuento de la argentina Samanta Schweblin En la estepa, se teje un magistral homenaje a esos relatos de Julio Cortázar, espesos de un terror que no se nombra y que poco a poco se va asomando entre pequeños crujidos disonantes de la cotidianidad. Variaciones sobre temas de Marakami y Tsao Hsueh-Kin del mexicano Tryno Maldonado también puede leerse como una variación homenaje al maestro Jorge Luis Borges de Los senderos que se bifurcan, mientras que los personajes de Un desierto lleno de agua recuerda los personajes privilegiados y ciegos de Alfredo Bryce Echenique y del propio Cortázar. Por su parte Sun-Woo de Oliverio Coelho, aunque situado en un oscuro y minimalista apartamento en Corea, recuerda los maestros japoneses del erotismo perverso como Kōbō Abe, Jun'ichirō Tanizaki, Yukio Mishima o Yasunari Kawabata, a la vez que funciona perturbadoramente bien como crítica a la relación de dependencia económica que se teme puede marcar la relación próxima entre los llamados tigres asiáticos y Latinoamérica. Espinazo de pez del brasilero Santiago Nazarian es el ensayo más interesante de diversidad cultural en un continente que aún no se acostumbra a la presencia asiática, pero que empieza a explorarla. Entre los cuentos más interesantes y logrados destaca Lima, Perú, 28 de julio de 1979 del peruano Daniel Alarcón que relata el encuentro inesperado, que oscila en la tragicomedia, entre un aprendiz de revolucionario y un policía embriagado en las callejuelas de la Lima vieja. Por un instante la sensación de violencia absurda y el resentimiento visceral sin origen preciso están a punto de ceder ante una ficción sentimental tejida surrealmente entre ambos al lado de un perro callejero moribundo; de hecho el policía, como el perro, termina por preferir escoger la ficción, lo que le ocasiona una muerte en off tan absurda y fortuita como la del perro. En mi opinión, los mejores cuentos de la antología son Los curiosos del colombiano Juan Gabriel Vásquez y Huracán de la cubana Ena Lucía Portela. Los curiosos es un cuento magistral sobre la psicología social de una Medellín harta de violencia, que, en un instante, depone su resignación sólo para, tristemente, convertir una víctima de la violencia en chivo expiatorio de su frustración. Huracán es otra obra maestra de la pulsión de muerte, ambientada en la congelada desesperanza de un pueblo estancado en el que el discurso de inclusión esconde una creciente exclusión de cualquier diferencia, por nimia que sea. Como antología, la encontré dispareja y poco satisfactoria, a pesar de contener un puñado de cuentos verdaderamente memorables.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Uribe Díaz

    Diego Trelles ha hecho un trabajo digno de elogiar al juntar en un solo libro, piezas maravillosas de lo que se está produciendo por autores nacidos en este lado , a veces olvidado, del mundo. Cuentos que van de lo terrorífico a lo sexual, de lo grotesco a lo lírico,donde la violencia y la apatía parecen impregnadas en nuestra naturaleza, pero que situaciones fantásticas terminan por desmontar y hacen vibrar al lector. Disfruté descubriendo a grandes valores como Samanta Schweblin, Zambra, Ortuñ Diego Trelles ha hecho un trabajo digno de elogiar al juntar en un solo libro, piezas maravillosas de lo que se está produciendo por autores nacidos en este lado , a veces olvidado, del mundo. Cuentos que van de lo terrorífico a lo sexual, de lo grotesco a lo lírico,donde la violencia y la apatía parecen impregnadas en nuestra naturaleza, pero que situaciones fantásticas terminan por desmontar y hacen vibrar al lector. Disfruté descubriendo a grandes valores como Samanta Schweblin, Zambra, Ortuño, Tryno Maldonado, Jeftanovic, entre otros y confirmar el presente de "consagrados" como Roncagliolo, Vasquez, Alarcon o Yushimito. Altamente recomendable,en una preciosa edición de una nueva editorial peruana (Madriguera) que promete muchos éxitos más.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Lloyd

    A rather strange collection of short stories. It's hit and miss - while many of the stories are excellent (Fish Spine was my particular favourite, succinct and lyrical and Shipwrecked on Naxos - bizarre and intimate), there are some stinkers as well (Chicken Soup seems like it could have been written by a GCSE student and Hypothetically didn't work for me at all). Definitely a good introduction to young Latin American writers, and I enjoyed how so many of the stories deal with challenging themes A rather strange collection of short stories. It's hit and miss - while many of the stories are excellent (Fish Spine was my particular favourite, succinct and lyrical and Shipwrecked on Naxos - bizarre and intimate), there are some stinkers as well (Chicken Soup seems like it could have been written by a GCSE student and Hypothetically didn't work for me at all). Definitely a good introduction to young Latin American writers, and I enjoyed how so many of the stories deal with challenging themes and structures.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chad Post

    DISCLAIMER: I am the publisher of the book and thus spent approximately two years reading and editing and working on it. So take my review with a grain of salt, or the understanding that I am deeply invested in this text and know it quite well. Also, I would really appreciate it if you would purchase this book, since it would benefit Open Letter directly.

  8. 4 out of 5

    kathe

    Muy buena, ésta antología! Hay un poco de todo y parece pues ser la temática, la humanidad latinoamericana. Este libro me recuerda de los importantes aportes de la narrativa latinoamericana a la literatura universal. Si bien hay cuentos mejores que otros (para todos los gustos y colores....), creo que es una antología que merece respeto.

  9. 5 out of 5

    World Literature Today

    "The strength of The Future Is Not Ours rests primarily on the merits of its most accomplished stories." - Ryan Long, University of Oklahoma This book was reviewed in the January 2013 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://bit.ly/VdakQ8 "The strength of The Future Is Not Ours rests primarily on the merits of its most accomplished stories." - Ryan Long, University of Oklahoma This book was reviewed in the January 2013 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://bit.ly/VdakQ8

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    First Read Win. This has twenty-three short stories gathered into one book. So if you don't like one story then there are twenty-two more to try out. I didn't love every story but I did like/love most of them. Good book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

    Buena selección de autores y textos. Lástima que la edicion de Sur+ se deshoje, cual margarita.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Debbi

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nickd85

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cooper

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ser

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Heberquijano

  18. 4 out of 5

    M

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Cárdenas

  20. 4 out of 5

    Doan Ortiz Zamora

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

  22. 5 out of 5

    Justin Paszul

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alberto

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hugo Daniel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Monsieur K

  26. 4 out of 5

    José

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mauricio Mandler

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julian Gallo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jorge

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Martínez

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.