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What Fears Become: An Anthology from The Horror Zine

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From classic horror and pure suspense to Twilight-Zone-style dark fantasy, WHAT FEARS BECOME relentlessly explores our basic fears and leaves you with twisted endings that will make your skin...


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From classic horror and pure suspense to Twilight-Zone-style dark fantasy, WHAT FEARS BECOME relentlessly explores our basic fears and leaves you with twisted endings that will make your skin...

56 review for What Fears Become: An Anthology from The Horror Zine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    What a variety of short stories! All of them within the horror or paranormal genres, every story completely different. This great collection comes from some newer authors, and several well-known authors. Jeani Rector has collected from among the best of the contributions of stories, poems and artwork from The Horror Zine. Some are just plain scary, some are psychological, some feature ghosts, monsters, werewolves, vampires, all the favourite demons of our nightmares and stories to be told around What a variety of short stories! All of them within the horror or paranormal genres, every story completely different. This great collection comes from some newer authors, and several well-known authors. Jeani Rector has collected from among the best of the contributions of stories, poems and artwork from The Horror Zine. Some are just plain scary, some are psychological, some feature ghosts, monsters, werewolves, vampires, all the favourite demons of our nightmares and stories to be told around a campfire or at Hallowe'en. An anthology to bring shivers and have us listening to bumps in the night. Some even come with a bit of humour... ghoulish humour. Reviewing an anthology is always somewhat difficult. Do I review them individually? Group them? Authors have contributed over 30 short stories, 18 poets contributing one or more poems each and 9 artists contributing. I think I will just say that this book will entertain the deepest fears hidden in the corners of the psyche. Great tales to tweak the imagination, make us feel something is watching, digging into our souls, acquainting us all with what fears become. Is your heart pounding and your spine tingling yet?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    A wonderful collection with such a variety that everyone is bound to find something they like, and quite a few new authors, whose works I will be looking out for.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christina Francine

    What Fears Become, An Anthology from The Horror Zine Edited by Jeani Rector Imajin Books, Aug. 2011 www.thehorrorzine.com ISBN# 978-1-926997-18-6, Ebook $4.99, Paperback $16.99 U.S. Cover Design by Sapphire Designs www.designs.sapphiredreams.org Review by Christina Francine http://ChristinaFrancine.wordpress.com What do reader’s fears become when they’re examined? Top-notch tales, poems, and images will horrify and delight readers in this anthology called What Fears Become. Each feature rips through real What Fears Become, An Anthology from The Horror Zine Edited by Jeani Rector Imajin Books, Aug. 2011 www.thehorrorzine.com ISBN# 978-1-926997-18-6, Ebook $4.99, Paperback $16.99 U.S. Cover Design by Sapphire Designs www.designs.sapphiredreams.org Review by Christina Francine http://ChristinaFrancine.wordpress.com What do reader’s fears become when they’re examined? Top-notch tales, poems, and images will horrify and delight readers in this anthology called What Fears Become. Each feature rips through reality plunging readers into frightful situations deep enough to provoke a bag full of nightmares. It is unlikely readers will set aside a single whisper-read word. Like stepping onto a monstrous scene, their wide eyes can’t look away. Thirty-one finely honed eager narratives, eighteen delicious poems, and eighteen visions touch all who dare venture inside. The foreword is by Simon Clark, and he has nothing but positive comments about What Fears Become. He titles this foreword, “A Small Matter of Life and Death.” Besides penning horror fiction, authors are teachers, radio personalities, newspaper reporters, editors, gardeners, musicians, poets, reality TV contestants, aides at mental hospitals, technical writers, volunteers, graphic designers, inventory clerks, writers of chapter units for history textbooks, receivers of prestigious awards, founders of martial art systems and have had films produced from novels. The collection opens with “Bast,” by Christina A. Larsen, which is about a man who visits his dying grandmother. Do cats really take breaths away? Marty finds out in this eerie yarn. Descriptive. “Next Time You’ll Know Me,” by Ramsey Campbell, is told in first-person by a paranoid person who threatens others because he believes they are the reason for all his bad luck. He focuses especially on someone who stole his stories and killed his mother. An unusual story. Another narrative sure to raise hackles is “Ouija” by Cheryl Kaye Tardif. Liza doesn’t like the Ouija board she’s had for years and decides to be rid of it once and for all, but her friend, Sharon, is overcome by curiosity. She disregards Liza’s warnings and asks the board a question. Suddenly, evil things begin to happen and the women decide to destroy it. By itself, the board reveals who will die and then they do. One night the women’s names are spelled out. Now, they’re determined to rid themselves of this evil once and for all. Wickedly scary, suspenseful reading. Tardif doesn’t disappoint. Scott Nicholson contributes a narrative readers cannot set aside. Their thoughts are held afterward too. His character, Kelly, becomes pregnant by Chet, the kind of man no woman should ever be with. Kelly decides that even though she’s the last of her family, she’ll soon have someone to love, to carry her family’s name, and to inherit her family’s humble farm house. Another infant hovers near Kelly. From the family cemetery Kelly realizes the ghost baby grows at the same rate as the one in her belly does. The white shape hangs around the old Stamey Cemetery, not far from the old Cherokee ceremonial mound. When Chet comes back to Kelly, he cruelly decides she and her baby shouldn’t live, yet the ghost baby decides they should. Poetry in this collection is respectfully good. Not only are the author’s imaginations powerful, but it is evident they’ve studied poetry form. When examining “A Guide for Ethical Zombie Murder,” by Emon Anthousis, readers find six stanzas written in blank verse, and written as a “how-to” accept becoming a zombie. He explains the whys for each step, and the necessary cautions during this change. Authousis ends his rhyme advise on a humorous note. “Bugs,” by Dennis Bogwell, features ten stanzas. The rhyme scheme begins with abab, goes into cdcd in the second stanza, and then into fgfg for the remaining eight. Each line is short, carrying punch, not only creating a sense of squittering like a bug, but by bringing urgency to the exasperation the character feels about dealing with bugs. Readers will squirm themselves with this poem. Peter Steele, carries a recommendation for those who consider resisting their morbid circumstances with a rhyme called “City of the Dead.” The first three stanzas help readers realize their state and how much is changing. The last turns to sharing sentiments of empathy and reveals how the poem’s author knows. This is because he was once there himself. Steele knows pain and advises readers a final resolve. Though sixteen lines and the rhyme scheme doesn’t fit neatly into the English or Italian sonnet, The City of the Dead” is in fixed form. Each line in the four stanzas tries to stick to ten syllables. Each stanza contains two couplets and goes: aabb, ccbb, eebb, ffbb. No one can argue that Steele studied poetry, or that he has a sense of humor. Besides writing poetry, poets write biographies, songs, screenplays, comic strips, novels, short stories, and non-fiction. They come from all over the world, won prestigious prizes, and have multi-published. Besides the writing profession, other vocations of poets include Navy engineers, chemists, musicians, and financial systems annalists. Artwork in “What Fears Become” is in black, white, and shades of gray. Each conjures up feelings of loneliness, deep thought, boldness and a dark slice of freedom. Each dares a peak into crevices and borders, into eyes and into open body parts, and of their situation of thought. Artists include graphic designers, poets, writers, sculptures, tailors, and work in pencil, crayon, pen and ink, watercolors, digital, and oil paints. Jeani Rector is the editor for “What Fears Become.” She is also the founder and editor of The Horror Zine. Multiple publications have featured her stories. A novel called Around a Dark Corner was released by Graveyard Press in 2009 by Rector. Dean H. Wild is the assistant editor of The Horror Zine. He has written love stories, and been a freelance copywriter. What Fears Become examines the horrors of human-kind, dares to lift the lid, dares to step into the headlights and to follow dark whispers. Why examine nightmares? Because they remind us that monsters and horror lurk just under the surface, and by examining them we gain strength. Determination to keep them at bay is renewed when we realize horror resides only inches away. What do readers fears become if not examined – reality.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elusive

    'What Fears Become' comprises a collection of short stories and poetry revolving around various subject matters. Whether you're looking for a tale about ghosts, killers or vampires, it's all here plus a whole lot more. Like most anthologies, I found this to be average as a whole. There were a couple of really well-written stories which left me wanting more. Besides that, some stories ended too abruptly or quickly for my liking - they felt incomplete. Some were mediocre and forgettable, making me 'What Fears Become' comprises a collection of short stories and poetry revolving around various subject matters. Whether you're looking for a tale about ghosts, killers or vampires, it's all here plus a whole lot more. Like most anthologies, I found this to be average as a whole. There were a couple of really well-written stories which left me wanting more. Besides that, some stories ended too abruptly or quickly for my liking - they felt incomplete. Some were mediocre and forgettable, making me wonder how they even got published to begin with. I had high hopes for the poetry section but only a few poems appealed to me. The rest were disappointing, especially the ones which were merely paragraphs broken down into shorter sentences. Overall, 'What Fears Become' featured some truly captivating short stories that were certainly worth the time but the others didn't quite live up to my expectations.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Siduri Moonshine

    Jeani Rector is know by many as the driving force and editor of “The Horror Zine” and is an established author in her own right. It’s been nigh going on a month since I’ve first cracked open, “What Fear Becomes,” an anthology of thirty one short stories, eighteen poems, and the provocatively bold and creative work of nine up and coming talented artists. Simon Clark writes a thought provoking anthropological view on short stories in his forward. But wait......there’s more! Tucked at the end is Je Jeani Rector is know by many as the driving force and editor of “The Horror Zine” and is an established author in her own right. It’s been nigh going on a month since I’ve first cracked open, “What Fear Becomes,” an anthology of thirty one short stories, eighteen poems, and the provocatively bold and creative work of nine up and coming talented artists. Simon Clark writes a thought provoking anthropological view on short stories in his forward. But wait......there’s more! Tucked at the end is Jeani’s, “Editor’s Corner” where she included two of her own spawn, “Horoscope” and “The House on Henley Way.” All of this packed into 384 pages published in 2011. Make no mistake and do not doubt my words, “What Fear Becomes” will linger in your mind, in the deepest darkest recesses waiting for the right moment, in the still of the night leaving you to question, “Was that the cat or????? This isn’t the run of the mill anthology filled with the typical blaze horror stories. This collection is different; it’s cutting edge horror and is what you least would expect. An ambitious anthology filled with the tales, prose, and artwork of promising new writers and artists, and some established. These short tales meld together to create this suspenseful page turning easy to read book. The quality of writing is impressionable. The stories, poems, and art work smoothly transition into the other. Jeani rises a cone of fear in her editing that leaves her readers to wonder in all due actuality what fear does become! I found myself being caught up in this cone of rising fear and could not stop reading as the suspense and fear escalated. “What Fear Becomes” contains the best stories I’ve read in some time! It’s that first story or few stories that make or break a book for the writer. “Bast,” a short story by Christina A. Larsen, begins the rise to fear. Allow me to briefly introduce you to Bast. Bast is a one eyed black cat who resides in a nursing home, has free rein of the place and is considered a comfort by everyone except for Marty. Marty’s grandmother is hovering near death and Bast joins Marty on this particular visit. Cats are said to suck the breath out of infants in cribs and the old. Is that what happens? Larsen makes us wonder. We, the reader have to make the connections and infer this based on what we associate from what we know. Bast isn’t finished and follows Marty out to his car where his dog Freya, also named after a Goddess, is waiting. Will Marty’s dog save him from the clutches of Bast? We never know as Larsen ends the story by taking her reader on a hair rising ride with just so much gas left. Speaking of rides, the story that stands out in my mind as one that hands you a curve ball ending is, “And Baby You Can Sleep While I Drive” by Elizabeth Massie. Massie is adept in her skill as a writer in weaving a suspenseful tale and this story reminds me so much of the climax and then the, “Scare the pooh outta ya” punch seen in Stephen King’s, “Gerald’s Game.” You have to trust me on this one and read that story! It’s that awesome! The stories end with, “What The Blind Man saw” by C. Dennis Moore. This one will leave you shaking your head wondering what exactly happened. What really seals the fear within is the macabre artwork by Tatomir Pitariu entitled, “Black Plague.” Dennis Bagwell’s poem, “Bugs (for Diana)” captures the epitome of fear! You can’t help but itch whilst reading his ode to all things creepy and crawly! Well done poem Dennis! The poetry of Everett Madrid is wondrously open for interpretation. The artwork is absolutely stunning and has depth. One can, as with the stories and prose interpret several different meanings, always wondering what one’s perceptions are or were. The best example of this is Daniel Kirk’s drawing, “Religious Backbone!” I got the feeling of seeing the backside of someone sitting in an electric chair. Yet there is more to this than just that, look closer and deeply into the open backbone. The genius of this anthology is that the reader doesn’t really know the exact ending to most of the stories, there is that element of wonderment which makes for good fodder to mull over in the middle of the night, raising questions and that cone of fear! The writers and artists know their craft well and it shows! Jeani Rector has done a superb job of showcasing their fine talents! There is no question about it, “What Fear Becomes” is imperative in it’s title and leaves one knowing this isn’t a question! I devoured this anthology in a matter of a few evenings. I am now hungering for more! “What Fear Becomes” is a definite 5 star PLUS rating!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    Leave...The...Light...On........... There may be those horror addicts out there who love reading scary stories at bedtime and if so WHAT FEAR BECOMES is just that resource. This generous book is rich in terrifying tales in the form of short stories, poems that haunt you, and an assortment of art that addresses the content or rather the atmosphere of the book. Compiled by the deft skills of editor Jeani Rector this collection of moments of fright includes excerpts from the best of the horror magaz Leave...The...Light...On........... There may be those horror addicts out there who love reading scary stories at bedtime and if so WHAT FEAR BECOMES is just that resource. This generous book is rich in terrifying tales in the form of short stories, poems that haunt you, and an assortment of art that addresses the content or rather the atmosphere of the book. Compiled by the deft skills of editor Jeani Rector this collection of moments of fright includes excerpts from the best of the horror magazines - The Horror Zine - and in addition to previously published works it manages to unveil some frightening stories form famous and soon to be famous authors. Whatever it is that starts our rather international and multicultural fascination with scary stories the authors of these stories and poems are in touch with that. Some of the stories contain a rather bizarre sick humor while others slog into treacherous climes that make us fear quicksand or death by other means equally as treacherous. How Rector decided to align these tales is anyone's guess, but whatever the evil force that inspired her to paste these moments together - works! Some of the stories are long, some very brief. Some are interspersed with black and white line drawings and illustrations by nine artists (very talented ones at that) and there is also a section of poetry. A little sample by Australian born American poet John Grey: HANGING TREE Its outer limbs Reverberated against the shake of its dead leaves as if a body had just been cut down and it wasn't until late May that the reluctant sun finally burnt off the thick chunks of ice that shrouded its vein-like roots. It is difficult to list stories that stand out, but surely one by Canadian writer Cheryl Kaye Tardiff deserves mention. OUIJA my sound like just the name of a fascinating board game - until you read the secrets that lie within the grasp of the indestructible Ouija board whose story lies in a shrouded letter found in an old box explains the deaths of a host of people. This is a very well conceived and produced book that is certain to whet the appetites of all devotees of horror stories. But for those of us who don't read them at bedtime, best to absorb them slowly in the light of day or by a glowing fire - an then leave the bedside lamp on - just in case... Grady Harp

  7. 5 out of 5

    Graham Downs

    Like most anthologies, this one's a bit of a mixed bag. Some of the stories were scary as hell (I especially remember the one about the Ouija board). Others, I didn't find particularly scary, but I thought the stories were excellent, just the same. I think they weren't scary for me because I'm so desensitised to horror; I'm sure many of them would give other readers nightmares. Still other stories - there are LOTS to choose from in this collection - were kind of... "meh". I remember commenting to Like most anthologies, this one's a bit of a mixed bag. Some of the stories were scary as hell (I especially remember the one about the Ouija board). Others, I didn't find particularly scary, but I thought the stories were excellent, just the same. I think they weren't scary for me because I'm so desensitised to horror; I'm sure many of them would give other readers nightmares. Still other stories - there are LOTS to choose from in this collection - were kind of... "meh". I remember commenting to my wife that, strangely, most of the stories I didn't quite like were from highly prolific, multi-award winning authors. That made me think that the big dinosaurs have had their day, and it's time for young blood in horror fiction. The artwork is both scattered throughout the stories themselves, and contained in an entire section all of their own. And some of it is spectacular! On to the poetry. Hmm.... Well, let me say, that I just don't "get" poetry. I read a few of them, but I only really enjoyed the ones that rhymed. And not all of those, either. After that, I skipped to the end of that section. I DID try, but I don't think I'm equipped to appreciate all the nuances, and I don't understand the rules. So my impression of the poems in this anthology hasn't factored into my rating; it just wouldn't be fair. Still, if you love the art form, you'll probably appreciate at least some of them. The stories, though, are all well edited, and lovingly collected. If you like horror, and you like short stories, I'd say pick it up. The stories you DO enjoy will probably outweigh the ones you don't.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jade

    This was a great book! Right from the beginning.. the forward by Simon Clark was gripping and beautiful! He also spoke of Jeani Rectors ‘TheHorrorZine’, which I can’t believe I’ve been missing out on! She is also the editor of this book and has two of her own stories in the ‘Editor’s Corner’ at the end, which are fantastic!! In between are some wonderfully creepy short stories and poetry, let alone the incredible art! Jeani has gathered a remarkable group of people and put them in one book! I lo This was a great book! Right from the beginning.. the forward by Simon Clark was gripping and beautiful! He also spoke of Jeani Rectors ‘TheHorrorZine’, which I can’t believe I’ve been missing out on! She is also the editor of this book and has two of her own stories in the ‘Editor’s Corner’ at the end, which are fantastic!! In between are some wonderfully creepy short stories and poetry, let alone the incredible art! Jeani has gathered a remarkable group of people and put them in one book! I love the bio at the end of each story, poem or piece of art… it gave me the opportunity to go to his or her site and find even more things to explore and enjoy! Disturbing or beautiful you cannot deny pure talent!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    James

    I am a big fan of anthologies and "What Fears Become" is right up there at the top of my list of favorites. Normally I will skip around and read the stories that sound interesting or were written by someone I am familiar with, but not with this one. I read it straight through and enjoyed each story thoroughly. Each one was eerily suspenseful providing a different morsel of horror with each turn of the page... I am a big fan of anthologies and "What Fears Become" is right up there at the top of my list of favorites. Normally I will skip around and read the stories that sound interesting or were written by someone I am familiar with, but not with this one. I read it straight through and enjoyed each story thoroughly. Each one was eerily suspenseful providing a different morsel of horror with each turn of the page...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alyanna Cyril

    For me, this was an amazing book to satisfy your cravings of true horror that will thrill you to the bones. The great thing about this book is that it's a variety of stories and each has a unique way of portraying itself from the readers the true mystery behind it. i rated it 4 stars of course. A good collection of horror stories. For me, this was an amazing book to satisfy your cravings of true horror that will thrill you to the bones. The great thing about this book is that it's a variety of stories and each has a unique way of portraying itself from the readers the true mystery behind it. i rated it 4 stars of course. A good collection of horror stories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Martin Willis

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy Lee

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natalia Corres

  16. 5 out of 5

    david

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Astrid

  19. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vickie Thanapal

  22. 4 out of 5

    ginger nielsen

  23. 5 out of 5

    M R Lowhon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scott Nicholson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jason Lester

  27. 4 out of 5

    Juniper

  28. 4 out of 5

    Liz.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

  30. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

  31. 5 out of 5

    Alana

  32. 5 out of 5

    B. Barron

  33. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  34. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  35. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  36. 5 out of 5

    Darren

  37. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia

  38. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  39. 4 out of 5

    Misty

  40. 4 out of 5

    Igraine

  41. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  42. 4 out of 5

    Elvira Scaff

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kasane Teto

  44. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  45. 4 out of 5

    Marion

  46. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

  47. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  48. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

  49. 5 out of 5

    Maryann Fläsch

  50. 4 out of 5

    DarjeelingDoll

  51. 5 out of 5

    Andrey

  52. 5 out of 5

    Amy Baker

  53. 5 out of 5

    John Fichter

  54. 4 out of 5

    Toriana Zeyzus

  55. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  56. 4 out of 5

    Threeattic

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