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Testing Is Not Teaching: What Should Count in Education

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In the rush to implement high-stakes testing, narrow standards, and top-down management of public education, the interests of two key stakeholders have been ignored: students and teachers. Not anymore. In Testing Is Not Teaching, his most political book to date, Don Graves focuses on the education issues of our day-and he doesn't always like what he sees. In 22 new essays t In the rush to implement high-stakes testing, narrow standards, and top-down management of public education, the interests of two key stakeholders have been ignored: students and teachers. Not anymore. In Testing Is Not Teaching, his most political book to date, Don Graves focuses on the education issues of our day-and he doesn't always like what he sees. In 22 new essays that are classic Graves, he shows how testing encroaches on teacher freedom; considers how narrow standards can actually reduce student achievement; asks questions that can help teachers to cope with these new restrictions; discusses practices that support humane teaching in a testing environment; and much more. Graves packs his thoughts into short but substantial essays-nuggets perfect for teacher meetings, planning sessions, teacher reading groups, or individual teachers pressed for time. Whether you know the ins and outs of standards and testing or whether you want to know more, Graves writing will push you toward a better understanding of our current education climate and how it impacts your curriculum. After twenty years as your mentor in classics like Writing and A Fresh Look at Writing, Don Graves has become your advocate, speaking out because, like you, he cares about your students, your practice, and your professional dignity. If the arrival of testing and other accountability measures compromises your classroom, don't let your interests be ignored. Join your voice with Don Graves' and reclaim your practice.


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In the rush to implement high-stakes testing, narrow standards, and top-down management of public education, the interests of two key stakeholders have been ignored: students and teachers. Not anymore. In Testing Is Not Teaching, his most political book to date, Don Graves focuses on the education issues of our day-and he doesn't always like what he sees. In 22 new essays t In the rush to implement high-stakes testing, narrow standards, and top-down management of public education, the interests of two key stakeholders have been ignored: students and teachers. Not anymore. In Testing Is Not Teaching, his most political book to date, Don Graves focuses on the education issues of our day-and he doesn't always like what he sees. In 22 new essays that are classic Graves, he shows how testing encroaches on teacher freedom; considers how narrow standards can actually reduce student achievement; asks questions that can help teachers to cope with these new restrictions; discusses practices that support humane teaching in a testing environment; and much more. Graves packs his thoughts into short but substantial essays-nuggets perfect for teacher meetings, planning sessions, teacher reading groups, or individual teachers pressed for time. Whether you know the ins and outs of standards and testing or whether you want to know more, Graves writing will push you toward a better understanding of our current education climate and how it impacts your curriculum. After twenty years as your mentor in classics like Writing and A Fresh Look at Writing, Don Graves has become your advocate, speaking out because, like you, he cares about your students, your practice, and your professional dignity. If the arrival of testing and other accountability measures compromises your classroom, don't let your interests be ignored. Join your voice with Don Graves' and reclaim your practice.

30 review for Testing Is Not Teaching: What Should Count in Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    A must read for all educators. It reaffirms all I know to be true about teaching and learning. I really miss Don's voice in our current education landscape. A must read for all educators. It reaffirms all I know to be true about teaching and learning. I really miss Don's voice in our current education landscape.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diana Pettis

    I wish I had the chance to meet Donald Graves when he was alive. This text was a collection of short essays about topics in writing education. The essay I found the most interesting was the child as an evaluator of their work. In this text, Donald Graves references his other text the Energy to Teach published in 2001. I know this is a text I will read soon. Deep thinking text for my teacher friends but I would recommend to all.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    This was m first Donald Graves book and I am looking forward to reading more of his work. He validated many of my teaching practices, in particular our commitment to writing EVERY DAY.... he says, when children write every day they think about the writing even when they are away from it and the writing stays in motion. Skip a day or two and it's like starting over. How true. This was m first Donald Graves book and I am looking forward to reading more of his work. He validated many of my teaching practices, in particular our commitment to writing EVERY DAY.... he says, when children write every day they think about the writing even when they are away from it and the writing stays in motion. Skip a day or two and it's like starting over. How true.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ross Bussell

    Alright, I had to read this short piece for a graduate course, but it speaks the truth. This isn't anything an education practitioner wouldn't want to read, but for me, it has influenced my own growing research and background on the politics of education. A very telling, truthful scholarly work. Alright, I had to read this short piece for a graduate course, but it speaks the truth. This isn't anything an education practitioner wouldn't want to read, but for me, it has influenced my own growing research and background on the politics of education. A very telling, truthful scholarly work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gigi

    I enjoyed this short collection of essays. Graves is great at getting to the point and shares his feelings and research about teaching and learning.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason Courtmanche

    Theory-lite, but an inspring read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Art

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shirley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Demetrios

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

  12. 5 out of 5

    TutorPanel

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erica Justice

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Cromer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jana Boody-billings

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tammy McMorrow

  21. 5 out of 5

    Halpey

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heather Caswell

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Morrison

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ricki

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Roberts

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Fryer

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