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Children Are from Heaven: Positive Parenting Skills for Raising Cooperative, Confident, and Compassionate Children

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A new book about parenting from the prolific author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus John Gray's Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus is a history-making bestseller with more than 7 million copies in print in hardcover. This new book on parenting will round out the relationship mega-brand that John has created. Focusing on children ages 1-9, John explains that t A new book about parenting from the prolific author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus John Gray's Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus is a history-making bestseller with more than 7 million copies in print in hardcover. This new book on parenting will round out the relationship mega-brand that John has created. Focusing on children ages 1-9, John explains that this is the period of dependence in a child's life when character and sense of self are shaped.  Parents everywhere are sure to breathe a sigh of relief that they now have a John Gray book they can turn to help children reach their fullest potential.


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A new book about parenting from the prolific author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus John Gray's Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus is a history-making bestseller with more than 7 million copies in print in hardcover. This new book on parenting will round out the relationship mega-brand that John has created. Focusing on children ages 1-9, John explains that t A new book about parenting from the prolific author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus John Gray's Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus is a history-making bestseller with more than 7 million copies in print in hardcover. This new book on parenting will round out the relationship mega-brand that John has created. Focusing on children ages 1-9, John explains that this is the period of dependence in a child's life when character and sense of self are shaped.  Parents everywhere are sure to breathe a sigh of relief that they now have a John Gray book they can turn to help children reach their fullest potential.

30 review for Children Are from Heaven: Positive Parenting Skills for Raising Cooperative, Confident, and Compassionate Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nariman

    At first I thought I was reading this one for work, and I saw from the title that it only concerns parents or teachers... but my interest grew bigger soon after I started with it. It helps us to know more about ourselves now, when we understand what got us here and this book takes us way back to childhood. It shows us the links between some of our insecurities or securities and the parenting techniques or lack of techniques we received as children. We see how some of our characteristics and tende At first I thought I was reading this one for work, and I saw from the title that it only concerns parents or teachers... but my interest grew bigger soon after I started with it. It helps us to know more about ourselves now, when we understand what got us here and this book takes us way back to childhood. It shows us the links between some of our insecurities or securities and the parenting techniques or lack of techniques we received as children. We see how some of our characteristics and tendencies began to evolve. What I would like to share from this book is some chapters' titles. The Five Messages of Positive Parenting: - It's okay to be different. - It's okay to make mistakes. - It's okay to express negative emotions. - It's okay to want more. - It's okay to say no, but remember mom and dad are the bosses. The Four Temperaments: -Sensitive children need listening and understanding. - Active children need preparation and structure. - Responsive children need distraction and direction. - Receptive children need ritual and rhythm. And The Different intelligences: - Academic intelligence. - Emotional intelligence. - Physical intelligence. - Creative intelligence. - Artistic intelligence. - Common sense intelligence. - Intuitive intelligence. - Gifted intelligence. I do recommend it to self-explorers and I think it's a must-read for parents and teachers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eman Helmy

    Very good once he gets to the point!! I think this book should be summarized to half of it. Over 350 pages is too much for what he has to say. And the question" HOW do I do that."arises a lot while I'm reading. Maybe everything will come clear at the end. Otherwise there are a lot of important points about parenting I learned from here that I wouldn't have known elsewhere. I'm a Bit skeptical about the part about avoiding fear based methods,I think there should be at least a tiny part of it. The Very good once he gets to the point!! I think this book should be summarized to half of it. Over 350 pages is too much for what he has to say. And the question" HOW do I do that."arises a lot while I'm reading. Maybe everything will come clear at the end. Otherwise there are a lot of important points about parenting I learned from here that I wouldn't have known elsewhere. I'm a Bit skeptical about the part about avoiding fear based methods,I think there should be at least a tiny part of it. The chapter about minimizing resistance is good though,tells you how to deal with every kind of child.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I skimmed a lot, but appreciated the techniques in here. Skip this repetitive read, and give your kids 5 things: 1. Permission to be different, which enables children to discover, appreciate, and develop their unique inner potential and purpose. 2. Permission to make mistakes, which enables children to self-correct, learn from their mistakes, and achieve greater success. 3. Permission to express negative emotions, which teaches children to manage their emotions and develop a feeling awareness tha I skimmed a lot, but appreciated the techniques in here. Skip this repetitive read, and give your kids 5 things: 1. Permission to be different, which enables children to discover, appreciate, and develop their unique inner potential and purpose. 2. Permission to make mistakes, which enables children to self-correct, learn from their mistakes, and achieve greater success. 3. Permission to express negative emotions, which teaches children to manage their emotions and develop a feeling awareness that makes them more confident, compassionate, and cooperative. 4. Permission to want more, which helps children develop a healthy sense of what they deserve and the skill of delayed gratification. They are able to want more, and yet be happy with what they have. 5. Permission to say no, which enables children to exercise their will and to define a true and positive sense of self. This freedom strengthens children’s mind, heart, and will and develops a greater awareness of what they want, feel, and think. This permission to resist authority is at the basis of all the positive-parenting skills. Then every time you need cooperation, do the following steps: 1. Ask for what you want child to do 2. Listen and validate feelings 3. Offer a related reward if possible ("If you get PJs on now, we'll have time for a story") 4. Give a command ("I want you to..."). Repeat this command several times if necessary. 5. Give a time out (not a punishment, but a chance for child to regain self control)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tatuu

    Thanks to my journal, I discover that I read some parenting books in the year 2008. But why??? I remember this to be a bulky book and I definitely can't remember all the principles that are shared until I read it again. Here are 5 messages to positive parenting. 1. It's okay to be different 2. It's okay to make mistakes 3. It's okay to express negative emotions 4. It's okay to want more. [Though I have an issue with this- if it's okay to want more, then how will I teach them contentment?] Maybe that Thanks to my journal, I discover that I read some parenting books in the year 2008. But why??? I remember this to be a bulky book and I definitely can't remember all the principles that are shared until I read it again. Here are 5 messages to positive parenting. 1. It's okay to be different 2. It's okay to make mistakes 3. It's okay to express negative emotions 4. It's okay to want more. [Though I have an issue with this- if it's okay to want more, then how will I teach them contentment?] Maybe that was explained but I didn't put it down. 5. It's okay to say no, but Mom and Dad are the bosses.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fanny

    I felt quite disappointed and did not even finish reading this book. Some of the advice are interesting but others seem pretty unrealistic to me. I agree with Gray's approach of avoiding punishment, physical or psychological, but his method has not convinced me fully. The practical examples he gives on how to speak to children seem very unlikely to me. Furthermore, the book is quite repetitive and lengthy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tasneem Zafer

    Was very helpful! I don't agree though with some of the ideas but in general I really learned something that has helped me a lot when I first started teaching kg1s! I highly recommend teachers and parents to go through it once at least! Thank you Miss Mariam for recommending the book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rawan J.

    This is an excellent book for (new) mamas who are as confused and anxious as I am as my baby approaches toddlerhood! The messages were very clear and came in small chunks. Very easy to absorb and apply. I felt some sort of comfort cloud over me as I read this book. I would definitely recommend it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan McGuinness

    Let those five messages sink in and the skills to back them up

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marci

    I found some of his advice to be interesting, but he tends to go on and on in his writing and I found myself skipping over paragraphs because it seemed so repetitive. I do really like his steps for encouraging obedience from children...although he doesnt call it obedience really, he calls it childrens natural desire to please their parents. I have been discouraged lately as I hear my son mimic orders to me and I don't like it. So, following Dr. Gray's advice to ask "Would you....please?" brought I found some of his advice to be interesting, but he tends to go on and on in his writing and I found myself skipping over paragraphs because it seemed so repetitive. I do really like his steps for encouraging obedience from children...although he doesnt call it obedience really, he calls it childrens natural desire to please their parents. I have been discouraged lately as I hear my son mimic orders to me and I don't like it. So, following Dr. Gray's advice to ask "Would you....please?" brought about immediate changes in how my son talks to me now. There are some more steps that come after the initial request, should the child choose to say No, that I still need to work on in order to see how effective it is, but overall - reading this book was a nice reminder to just be more polite to my son and even my husband. The atmosphere in the house has changed for the better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    This was highly recommended to me. However, so far, it hasn't given me any earth-shattering news. Don't beat your kids. (anyone surprised?) Then it has focused on parents focusing on the positives with their kids rather than the negative. Okay, so I got through chapter 9 and just couldn't do anymore. This has good ideas, but it's all obvious. Don't beat your kids. Use positive messages instead of threats. Thanks- learned that in 101 of teaching. If I hadn't been a teacher, this would have been mu This was highly recommended to me. However, so far, it hasn't given me any earth-shattering news. Don't beat your kids. (anyone surprised?) Then it has focused on parents focusing on the positives with their kids rather than the negative. Okay, so I got through chapter 9 and just couldn't do anymore. This has good ideas, but it's all obvious. Don't beat your kids. Use positive messages instead of threats. Thanks- learned that in 101 of teaching. If I hadn't been a teacher, this would have been much more helpful. But the book was SO repetitive. I felt like I was reading the same chapter over and over again... Oh well. :) I'd recommend this to anyone struggling with any children. Just don't expect a FUN read...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I am still reading this book. I am not sure whatto say yet. It is new and different than other parenting books I have read and I like the direction it is going in. I want to talk about it more and think about it more but I need to read more! My husband said when I mentioned one concept,"That is the opposite as the the other book we read!" I said,"I know, just go with it! It cannot hurt to try." I still am going to get to this book but the one I am reading right now takes priority! (Hold Onto Your I am still reading this book. I am not sure whatto say yet. It is new and different than other parenting books I have read and I like the direction it is going in. I want to talk about it more and think about it more but I need to read more! My husband said when I mentioned one concept,"That is the opposite as the the other book we read!" I said,"I know, just go with it! It cannot hurt to try." I still am going to get to this book but the one I am reading right now takes priority! (Hold Onto Your Kids) Some day I will read them all!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leahjoypro

    I picked up this book b/c years ago I read a lot of his relationship books and found them to be spot-on - especially "Mars and Venus on a Date". This book has a lot of great things to say, although I didn't necessarily agree with everything. His explanations of time-outs are helpful and interesting. He also has a lot of insight into understanding your child's point of view. Like many other parenting books I've read, he seems to borrow heavily from "How to Talk So Kids Will Listen...", but it's s I picked up this book b/c years ago I read a lot of his relationship books and found them to be spot-on - especially "Mars and Venus on a Date". This book has a lot of great things to say, although I didn't necessarily agree with everything. His explanations of time-outs are helpful and interesting. He also has a lot of insight into understanding your child's point of view. Like many other parenting books I've read, he seems to borrow heavily from "How to Talk So Kids Will Listen...", but it's still definitely worth a read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hamdanil

    Interesting book with a lot of useful material here. The author draws from his extensive experience as a parent and also as a professional counselor. But note that they are not based on scientific or rigorously proven research. The messages are simple and explained with easy-to-follow explanation and practical examples. Some of the themes explained are the importance of time-outs, "five messages of positive parenting", and four temperaments of children. Sometimes sounds gimmicky and repetitive, Interesting book with a lot of useful material here. The author draws from his extensive experience as a parent and also as a professional counselor. But note that they are not based on scientific or rigorously proven research. The messages are simple and explained with easy-to-follow explanation and practical examples. Some of the themes explained are the importance of time-outs, "five messages of positive parenting", and four temperaments of children. Sometimes sounds gimmicky and repetitive, but probably that's the prevailing style of writing when this book was published 15 years ago.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Curren

    This is the single best parenting book I have ever read. I own it in paperback, and I bought the audio cd. I have it on my ipod, and try to listen to every 6 months or so. It is so fantastic, and so good about how to parent all different types of kids in a positive way with firmness, but not meanness. I really love this book, and highly recommend it to everyone who deals with children.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Wilde

    I wish someone had given me this book when I had my first child. This is one of the single best books on child rearing that I have read. It stresses what I find so powerful and important: keeping the preciousness of the child at the forfront of your mind (even when you want to throw them out the window!)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Saleem Khashan

    Around me I still see people treating children like they were treated this is a good insight into thinking about how they should be treated, that is all!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    Is was good but dated. It was written in the 90's and reflected as such.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    I hated this book. I couldn't even finish it. Very opinionated and full of crap.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kimball

    This author said some things I didn't agree with. But maybe after i have kids I'll think differently. Famous last words right, parents? For a parenting book, it was alright. Go to my 'on parenting' shelves to find better classics if you want to learn more. I can't wait to breed an army - worthy of Mordor. Notes: The five most important messages your children need to hear are: it's ok to be different, it's ok to make mistakes, it's ok to express negative emotions, it's ok to want more, it's ok to sa This author said some things I didn't agree with. But maybe after i have kids I'll think differently. Famous last words right, parents? For a parenting book, it was alright. Go to my 'on parenting' shelves to find better classics if you want to learn more. I can't wait to breed an army - worthy of Mordor. Notes: The five most important messages your children need to hear are: it's ok to be different, it's ok to make mistakes, it's ok to express negative emotions, it's ok to want more, it's ok to say no, but remember mom and dad are the bosses. What parents suppress, their own children will express. The most important skill a father or mothers can teach their daughter is to ask for more. For some they should teach them how to work through disappointment. Timeouts should be only a minute for each year of their life. I've heard this a few times. Kids don't need to choices until after 9 years old. When children are demanding for what they want, they aren't getting what they need. Two reasons a child misbehaves: he is not getting what he needs to stay in touch with their feelings. It's determined how the parent deals with the child's unruly behavior. Punishing the child focuses the attention on the bad they did. If the child isn't cooperating, tell him that you'll have more time to do things with him if he cooperates. The easiest, best reward is to give more of you. Yelling is the weakest form of commanding. Boys need more trust girls need more caring. The author seemed to like to coddle the kids a little too much. Instead of saying "don't do that" say "I want you to do this". Happiness is learned from play.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bisher Tarazi

    Knowing that I am not the best one to evaluate this book since I don't have babies yet ( not even for the next 5 years :D ), but this book talked about several points which parent things about but they don't have the time to really invest on it: - Our rule in life to supervise our children and guide them to know what's right and what's wrong. - Our children are never us, they have their own life, they are the children of their own life. - People borns without any limits, it's us who build limits a Knowing that I am not the best one to evaluate this book since I don't have babies yet ( not even for the next 5 years :D ), but this book talked about several points which parent things about but they don't have the time to really invest on it: - Our rule in life to supervise our children and guide them to know what's right and what's wrong. - Our children are never us, they have their own life, they are the children of their own life. - People borns without any limits, it's us who build limits and borders for them. - You should that raise children is your duty, since you have made a decision about their existence. This is not their duty, they don't owe you anything in life. - The challenges and difficulties they are facing are the way to let them know how things going on - Life is not perfect, there is a way to say that for them. - You are an example for your children, pay attention to what does that means,

  21. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Central to this approach are the five positive messages your children need to learn again and again: It's okay to be different. It's okay to make mistakes. It's okay to express negative emotions. It's okay to want more. It's okay to say no, but remember Mom and Dad are the bosses.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed AlRuqaishi

    Good reminder for positive habits for parents.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gadzhi Rasulov

    Great book. Great advice. Totally recommend it to all parents in the world 👌🏻

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I read this book 18 times and listened to it a number of times on Audible. Often I will pick it up when I feel I want a refresh

  25. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    Out of date now, at least for me, but I can see the value it held at the time it was written

  26. 5 out of 5

    Candace

    Great guidance to help with the boys during different stages of life

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kinza Bashir

    Clear techniques for better parenting

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tariq Sheikh

    It is a good book, some good advises for parents how to raise kids....

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ayat Al Bloushi

    What a great book! This should be a reference for all parents, and I have been implementing what I learned from this book on my daughter and it is working well.

  30. 4 out of 5

    A'in Kamaruzaman

    I read this during my early 20s, only realized that how parenting affects the personality and development of children.

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