Hot Best Seller

Любовник смерти

Availability: Ready to download

Смерть — одна из героинь романа, получившая свое прозвище по двум причинам. Во-первых, она несколько раз была на волоске от гибели, но каждый раз оставалась жива и невредима. А во-вторых, все ее кавалеры погибали вскоре после того, как начинали за ней ухаживать. Девушка со страшным прозвищем Смерть так понравилась жителю Хитровки Сеньке Скорикову, что он решается на самые Смерть — одна из героинь романа, получившая свое прозвище по двум причинам. Во-первых, она несколько раз была на волоске от гибели, но каждый раз оставалась жива и невредима. А во-вторых, все ее кавалеры погибали вскоре после того, как начинали за ней ухаживать. Девушка со страшным прозвищем Смерть так понравилась жителю Хитровки Сеньке Скорикову, что он решается на самые отчаянные поступки, чтобы завладеть ее вниманием. В итоге парень становится свидетелем и даже соучастником череды убийств, находит старинный клад, сам чуть не прощается с жизнью, и, наконец, знакомится с Эрастом Фандориным, который помогает ему выбраться из всех передряг.


Compare

Смерть — одна из героинь романа, получившая свое прозвище по двум причинам. Во-первых, она несколько раз была на волоске от гибели, но каждый раз оставалась жива и невредима. А во-вторых, все ее кавалеры погибали вскоре после того, как начинали за ней ухаживать. Девушка со страшным прозвищем Смерть так понравилась жителю Хитровки Сеньке Скорикову, что он решается на самые Смерть — одна из героинь романа, получившая свое прозвище по двум причинам. Во-первых, она несколько раз была на волоске от гибели, но каждый раз оставалась жива и невредима. А во-вторых, все ее кавалеры погибали вскоре после того, как начинали за ней ухаживать. Девушка со страшным прозвищем Смерть так понравилась жителю Хитровки Сеньке Скорикову, что он решается на самые отчаянные поступки, чтобы завладеть ее вниманием. В итоге парень становится свидетелем и даже соучастником череды убийств, находит старинный клад, сам чуть не прощается с жизнью, и, наконец, знакомится с Эрастом Фандориным, который помогает ему выбраться из всех передряг.

30 review for Любовник смерти

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Part of the Summer reading vibe 2018 Part 2 or if you like the immediate follow up to “she lover of death” which I should likely have read soon after, I did mean too..... good intentions n all that & jus over a year has passed...... But now I am back with my good friend Erast Fandorin OR are we? We start with a street urchin AND lady Death herself, both new characters not present from the prior in the series & it’s their tale we follow from the start with “guest” appearances by Erast Fandorin along Part of the Summer reading vibe 2018 Part 2 or if you like the immediate follow up to “she lover of death” which I should likely have read soon after, I did mean too..... good intentions n all that & jus over a year has passed...... But now I am back with my good friend Erast Fandorin OR are we? We start with a street urchin AND lady Death herself, both new characters not present from the prior in the series & it’s their tale we follow from the start with “guest” appearances by Erast Fandorin along the way, who doesn’t really enter the dialogue until well past the 50% mark. Its a somewhat familiar style to me by now, in that the author doesn’t necessarily feature the MC in the story/book. The street urchin called Semka is very engaging & acts far wiser than his years as first he joins a notorious gang before moving on in the world as an “entrepreneur” in his own right. Lady Death is very alluring to all that cross her path, her monika giving a tell to what happens to all that do. I must admit I wasn’t sure where the story was going at first as Fandorin normally makes an appearance early doors (even if only a brief one) to give clarity & direction to the story, not so here but it certainly doesn’t detract as he has created a superb character in Semka & his allies/foes which we encounter. I can say no more for fear of revealing too much but if you like Sherlockian style sleuths, femme fatales, gangsters (Russian) of the early 1900’s, corruption, double dealings & tales of derring-do then this is a series for you. A very worthy addition to the Erast Fandorin series which gets better with every read, onwards I go 4.5 stars for me rounded down to 4

  2. 4 out of 5

    Viv JM

    Well, that was tremendous fun! Dickensian villains, fascinating historical detail, an exciting plot and a wonderfully tongue-in-cheek but slightly macabre sense of humour made this an absolute delight to read. Just what the doctor ordered!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Assaph Mehr

    This and 'He Lover of Death' are two intertwined novels, as can be guessed from the names. While the two mysteries are separate, they happen at roughly the same time. When Fandorin disappears from one book for a few days, he's busy on the other case - while the other cast continue of their separate paths. 'She' is a bohemian, slightly absurd mystery of a death cult. 'He' is a tale of low-life criminals and gangs, an almost rags-to-riches treasure hunt. Both have their femme fatales, as well as pl This and 'He Lover of Death' are two intertwined novels, as can be guessed from the names. While the two mysteries are separate, they happen at roughly the same time. When Fandorin disappears from one book for a few days, he's busy on the other case - while the other cast continue of their separate paths. 'She' is a bohemian, slightly absurd mystery of a death cult. 'He' is a tale of low-life criminals and gangs, an almost rags-to-riches treasure hunt. Both have their femme fatales, as well as plot twists. What to Expect Each novel is written as a different type of mystery. Akunin set out to rectify the low-brow reputation of the mystery genre in post-USSR Russia by writing worthy literature and exploring the wide gamut of sub-genres. Each novel is therefore excellently written as a different type of detective case. While there is continuity in the protagonist's life between the novels, each is very different in themes and tones. I've written a condensed review of the whole series on my website. What I liked I like the writing style. The prose is intelligent and flowing, the mysteries are complex, and the cast is varied (though those that make repeat appearances tend to die). Fandorin himself is a great character, even though as a main character he still remains an enigma - a tantalising mystery in itself that keeps readers engaged and clamouring to know more. I love the historical background. Akunin has done his research into Russian culture, mannerisms, environment, personalities, etc. of the late 19th century / early 20th century. Most of the stories take place around Moscow, and Fandorin gets to meet and associate with the people of the times (from the low-life criminals of Khitrovka, to the grand-dukes of the imperial family). In a few cases, Akunin also has Fandorin active around notable events of the era, at times filling in details where history has left us stumped. Akunin is also a Japanophile, and has Fandorin spend a few years in Japan. While details are sketchy (and we want more! More!), it is clear that he has a great love and deep knowledge of that culture and times. What to be aware of Be aware that each of the novel is told in a different style. Besides the obvious (something new and different in each volume), one keyword  is 'told'. They are almost all in 3rd person perspective, and quite often not from the point of view of Erast Fandorin (which is both tantalising and frustrating at times). It's this distance that keeps Fandorin an enigma, and keeps us coming back to learn more. Fandorin has a Sherlockian intellect and impressive physical prowess. He is not without his faults (most notably hubris), but as a hero he is certainly a cut above the rest. He also tends to get involved with a different femme fatale in each book. This suits the detective genre perfectly, regardless of modern sensibilities. While the books are not really related and have few continuing characters, I'd still strongly recommend to read them in order. Lastly, and this has nothing to do with Fandorin, since these are professional translations (amazingly done by Andrew Bromfield) via a traditional publisher, the price of ebooks and hardcovers is almost the same. The ebooks are also missing some of the illustrations and other typographical effects that are present in the print. I'd definitely recommend reading the print edition, where possible. Summary Should you read these novels? Yes! By all means, if you love historical mysteries these novels are a must read. It is an intelligent, engaging, and just different enough series to be in a class of its own. It's not surprising that in his home country of Russia, Akunin out-sells JK Rowling. In fact, since it's been a few years since I've read them, I think I'll go back and re-read my favourites (Winter Queen, State Counsellor, and The Coronation). -- Assaph Mehr, author of Murder In Absentia: A story of Togas, Daggers, and Magic - for lovers of Ancient Rome, Murder Mysteries, and Urban Fantasy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    And now we've come to number nine in the Fandorin series. This time the story is told in a third-person narrative, as seen through the eyes and experiences of a member of Moscow's criminal underworld, Senka Spirodov. And FYI, whoever wrote the blurb for the dustjacket cover put his name as Skorikov. I noticed that on Amazon UK, one reviewer repeated that name ... is it just my copy that has him as Spirodov? The action takes place at the same time as Fandorin's involvement in the suicide club inve And now we've come to number nine in the Fandorin series. This time the story is told in a third-person narrative, as seen through the eyes and experiences of a member of Moscow's criminal underworld, Senka Spirodov. And FYI, whoever wrote the blurb for the dustjacket cover put his name as Skorikov. I noticed that on Amazon UK, one reviewer repeated that name ... is it just my copy that has him as Spirodov? The action takes place at the same time as Fandorin's involvement in the suicide club investigation from She Lover of Death, and involves another young person infatuated with Death. However, in Senka's case, Death is the nickname of a living person, a beautiful young woman whose lovers all ended up dying -- not by her hand, but from different causes. After a while Death gained a reputation, leaving people who walked by her to cross themselves or to spit over their shoulders. Now she lives in the Khitrovka district of Moscow, where decent people don't venture and where the criminal organizations are pitted against each other in a struggle for control. Senka ended up here after family circumstances left him orphaned and with an uncle who used him for free labor and other abuses; a desire to do a good deed ultimately got him into trouble and he had to run away. Where better than Khitrovka, where no one would dare come to find him? It is there where he becomes infatuated with the woman called Death, whose intervention sends him into the employ of The Prince, the leader of one of the two top crime organizations in the area, and a lover of Death as well. On an errand of mercy for Death, Senka discovers the location of a treasure buried in the labyrinthine tunnels underneath the city -- and realizes that he has a ticket out of the criminal life. However, others who inhabit Khitrovka are not so lucky -- there are a series of ghastly murders occurring there. Enter Erast Fandorin, who must get to the bottom of these horrible crimes, and who knows that Death is the key to uncovering the truth. He Lover of Death is much more of an adventure story than a mystery, although there is plenty of crime and a growing list of suspects as the novel progresses. There might possibly be more humor in this installment than in the others preceding it, as Fandorin and Senka team up for some crazy adventures and Senka is roped into helping to solve the crimes. Quite a bit of time is given over to Senka's character and his changing life before Fandorin actually gets involved. The reason: he's been very busy with events from She Lover of Death, and now and then the author references some of that story in this one. It's a fun read that will keep you turning pages, not so much for the mystery but to find out what's going to happen to Senka next. It's almost like a rags-to-riches story where the hero finds himself in one desperate plight after another, but with the added interjection of humorous situations that you just know Akunin had a great time inventing. Again, my suggestion is to read these books in order, but you can get by with this one as a standalone if you don't want to go back and read the books that came before. This one may be the most fun book in the series -- less mystery really, but all the same, a good time will be had by all who poke their noses into this novel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Drayton Bird

    I have read every book I can by this man. He gets better and better. The early ones were interesting because they gave an insight into Tsarist times, with an engaging hero along the lines of Sir Percy Blakeney. This one is the best yet. It has a new dimension, as it introduces you to the Moscow underworld - which makes the behaviour of the mafia seem relatively genteel. For me, one of the measures of a good book is whether it makes me want to know more about the world it describes. This had me pro I have read every book I can by this man. He gets better and better. The early ones were interesting because they gave an insight into Tsarist times, with an engaging hero along the lines of Sir Percy Blakeney. This one is the best yet. It has a new dimension, as it introduces you to the Moscow underworld - which makes the behaviour of the mafia seem relatively genteel. For me, one of the measures of a good book is whether it makes me want to know more about the world it describes. This had me prowling through the internet (with very little success so far). Also it has a sexy, crazy heroine. Always good!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm

    I have really enjoyed Akunin's work from the outset, and in this case he hit has stride again. Exciting and adventurous, Akunin's ability to shift narrative voice between each novel (and in the Fadorin series his homage to style of authors of great detective fiction) is impressive. An excellent addition and a great way to spend a lazy day, immmersed in Moscow's early 20th century underworld. I have really enjoyed Akunin's work from the outset, and in this case he hit has stride again. Exciting and adventurous, Akunin's ability to shift narrative voice between each novel (and in the Fadorin series his homage to style of authors of great detective fiction) is impressive. An excellent addition and a great way to spend a lazy day, immmersed in Moscow's early 20th century underworld.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tiamat

    The translation is suprisingly bad, or rather, full of unbelievably strange mistakes. I think the translator didn't like this book very much, tried to get rid of the job as soon as possible and never even read the translation. There is no other explanation. I can understand why he didn't like it - I don't (because of thieves and their slang, also because of overdoing the pity part). There is the list of the most glaring mistakes. 1. They were on their way to the church to get married, she and her The translation is suprisingly bad, or rather, full of unbelievably strange mistakes. I think the translator didn't like this book very much, tried to get rid of the job as soon as possible and never even read the translation. There is no other explanation. I can understand why he didn't like it - I don't (because of thieves and their slang, also because of overdoing the pity part). There is the list of the most glaring mistakes. 1. They were on their way to the church to get married, she and her bridegroom, when suddenly these two black stallions, great huge brutes, darted right in front of their sleigh. What stallions? They were great black dogs. No wonder they startled the horses; moreover, a black dog is connected with Devil. 2. Prokha legged it straight away, and Skorik and Filin never stuck their noses out of the gateway. They were Speedy and the Night-Owl a minute ago. These are their Russian nicknames which were translated. I didn’t like Speedy and his full last name Spidorov – it sounds very bad in Russian. But I can hardly protest the necessity of translating meaningful names. Only please, translate them EVERY time. 3. the Chinee had caught one of his stupid sandals on a bottle and gone sprawling flat out. Not on a bottle, but on a cobble, because it was a cobblestone pavement. Masa is not that clumsy. 4. The hand went back down, but the sleeper still didn’t turn towards them. Senka took off his cap and crossed himself - the wall was covered with icons Missing: In the third room. Looks like the icons were in the room with the sleeping man or in the hallway. There are also some other missing phrases, but at least they weren’t quite necessary for understanding what's going on. 5. And there was an ice-cream seller too, they ambushed his daughter, who was engaged She wasn’t exactly engaged, she was simply of marrying age and quality, so to say. It’s a slightly archaic Russian expression – ‘doch’ nevesta’. 6. ‘Well, now what?’ the Prince asked. Then, turning to Yoshka: ‘Fire away, my little sharpshooter. No, 'Fire away' - that’s what Deadeye said, not the Prince. It’s obvious – he liked to talk pompously. The Prince didn’t know words like ‘sharpshooter’ XD In Russian it’s clear enough. And there are some other episodes where who did what is mixed up, but I don’t remember them exactly. So my overall impression of the translation is quite bad, I even checked if the translator was the same.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    This book took me a lot longer to engage with than the earlier Fandorin novels. This may be because my Russian proficiency has weakened somewhat, but despite that I think that the plot takes a particularly long time to develop in this novel. Once it did begin to develop it was an interesting story, but on the whole I don't think that this is the strongest of Akunin's writings. I would be interested to read it in English if it is ever translated, to see if I may have missed something. This book took me a lot longer to engage with than the earlier Fandorin novels. This may be because my Russian proficiency has weakened somewhat, but despite that I think that the plot takes a particularly long time to develop in this novel. Once it did begin to develop it was an interesting story, but on the whole I don't think that this is the strongest of Akunin's writings. I would be interested to read it in English if it is ever translated, to see if I may have missed something.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Olga

    Wow! Just wow! Here I was so happy that I read it in Russian. Cannot imagine how it could be translated but, evidently, many reviewers here and elsewhere appreciated it as much in English. I am not sure that translations could give justice to gazillions of allusions to Russian classics from "Van'ka Zhukov" by Chekhov, whose Van'ka wrote a semiliterate letter to his grandpa begging him to save him from his cruel employer like Vanya Skorik wrote to his brother Senya in this book - but what irony tho Wow! Just wow! Here I was so happy that I read it in Russian. Cannot imagine how it could be translated but, evidently, many reviewers here and elsewhere appreciated it as much in English. I am not sure that translations could give justice to gazillions of allusions to Russian classics from "Van'ka Zhukov" by Chekhov, whose Van'ka wrote a semiliterate letter to his grandpa begging him to save him from his cruel employer like Vanya Skorik wrote to his brother Senya in this book - but what irony though. Or deliberately mangled quote from Pushkin's poem "Kavkaz" to play on a character's nickname Kazbek. Also the auto race with it's clear references to "Golden Calf" by Ilf and Petrov. ("Ударим автопробегом по бездорожью и разгильдяйства"). At times Fandorin shows some characteristics of the beloved crook Ostap Bender from "Twelve Chairs" and "Golden Calf". Humor and irony are reminiscent of Ostap in several episodes from other books as well, e.g. the fake lottery in "Death of Achilles". And numerous others. The femme fatale in this novel nicknamed Death is alluring beyond control to every male who comes in contact with her, but the way she selects or rejects lovers is part of the mystery. The language of thieves, prostitutes and killers of the underground (at times, literally, underground) world of Moscow late 1800s is so colorful and rich that it is another aspect of this book, which, IMHO, is delightful but looses tons in translation. So far this is my favorite of the series, along with "Death of Achilles", and much better than "She-lover of death".

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    A thoroughly enjoyable historical mystery novel. Seen through the eyes of a young boy, Akunin gives us a vibrant account of the Moscow underworld in 1900. As in She Lover of Death, Akunin's series character, Fandorin, is presented from the outside allowing us to see him at a distance. Happening concurrently with She Lover of Death, with Fandorin off stage in his other plot most of the time, this book focuses on Senka - the poor orphaned lad who struggles with the conflict between his inherent go A thoroughly enjoyable historical mystery novel. Seen through the eyes of a young boy, Akunin gives us a vibrant account of the Moscow underworld in 1900. As in She Lover of Death, Akunin's series character, Fandorin, is presented from the outside allowing us to see him at a distance. Happening concurrently with She Lover of Death, with Fandorin off stage in his other plot most of the time, this book focuses on Senka - the poor orphaned lad who struggles with the conflict between his inherent goodness and the evil and dishonest life he is forced to live. The story moves at a quick pace, giving us memorable characters including a femme fatale called Death and a more fleshed out look at Fandorin's Japanese assistant, Masa. A lively book and while it may not be the perfect book to start one's fascination with Akunin and Fandorin, it isn't necessary to have read any of Akunin's previous books to enjoy this one. (Murder on the Leviathan would be my recommendation for an entry into Fandorin's world.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Williams

    Hell-for-leather criminal exposé with a nice literary conceit Akunin intertwines this story with She Lover of Death masterfully and chooses a narrator who shines a light on various lower strata of society. It never stops in its breakneck pace and the duplicity (or even multiplicity) is delightful as it unfolds.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Excellent look at the Khitrovka underworld.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bozena Gilewska

    Quite imaginative and surprising. Funny, but the ending felt a bit stretched.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janellyn51

    I've read all the previous Fandom in books, that is one. I love Masa, that is two, Senate is in a real Pickle, that is three. I've read all the previous Fandom in books, that is one. I love Masa, that is two, Senate is in a real Pickle, that is three.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matan

    Another excellent Fandorin novel.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Delamare

    I liked the writing style, especially the beginning full of slang. I sometimes had the impression of being in an Audiard's film as dialogues are very imaged (even if it was sometimes difficult to understand). As we go along the rise of Senka, the dialogue becomes more chastened, which makes the book more easy to read and allows us to support Senka its social progress. The chapters begin with a title which describe the action to follow, even if sometimes what we imagine is not what happens: the au I liked the writing style, especially the beginning full of slang. I sometimes had the impression of being in an Audiard's film as dialogues are very imaged (even if it was sometimes difficult to understand). As we go along the rise of Senka, the dialogue becomes more chastened, which makes the book more easy to read and allows us to support Senka its social progress. The chapters begin with a title which describe the action to follow, even if sometimes what we imagine is not what happens: the author plays with words to destabilize us and keep us from being too confident about our ability to know in advance what will happen. The titles all contain the name of Senka, since it is through him that we live history. An example title: "How Senka became mamzelle" (A mamzelle is a prostitute). The plot goes slowly but surely. Because we follow the investigation through Senka and not Fandorin, we do not have all the cards in the progression of thought. We do not know what the detective does when he's not with Senka, making us witnessing the outcome, so it is difficult to find the culprit by yourself. Last point to add, this book make us live from the inside (through Senka) what life in Russia was at that time, with its codes, its hierarchy, its neighborhoods. Life was harsh and corrupt, at least in slums as beautiful areas were protected. It feels a little like in Les Miserables - Russian version - and with an investigation for bonus. An author worth reading that allows us to discover a brutal Russia and to enjoy a nearly extinct language nowadays. Besides, I take hats off to Paul Lequesne (the French translator) who did a remarkable job to find the French slang which corresponds to that used by Akunin. An investigation in which the twists abound. A Russian detective as British as can be. A true atmosphere specific to the author. In short, Akunin, considered the idol of Russian literature, collects readers and I understand why: to try!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    And I think it is 100% official now--I have read all of his books that were translated in English. For some reason this one skipped past me when I was doublechecking the list--since so close to She-Lover of Death, which this book is something on a companion to. It's not necessary to read either one together, and that actually makes the concept that much more clever, but both books take place over the same period of time--although the POV of both books never actually crosses over. While Fandorin And I think it is 100% official now--I have read all of his books that were translated in English. For some reason this one skipped past me when I was doublechecking the list--since so close to She-Lover of Death, which this book is something on a companion to. It's not necessary to read either one together, and that actually makes the concept that much more clever, but both books take place over the same period of time--although the POV of both books never actually crosses over. While Fandorin is busy infiltrating a nihilist death cult, Masa is busy mentoring a wayward street kid--one with an Oliver Twist like background of abusive foster parents, hardscrabble life on the lam, petty thief in the slums, who gets in over his head and has to be rescued. The book is from Senka's POV and it's nice to see more of Masa and how Fandorin is seen through the kid's eyes. The main villain somewhat surprised me, though I guess in hindsight it was obvious, but these, like most or all great murder mysteries (thinking of the Flavia de Luce series in particular), the investigation is almost irrelevant when done right.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another great Erast Petrovich Fandorin novel. Two Moscow gangs who prey on the local population are pitted against each other as they try to extort a living from the pimps, whores and shopkeepers in the district. To further the confusion, the police are also on the take. A series of gruesome murders brings Erast Fandorin into the story. He has Masa befriend a local orphan, Senka, who has joined one of the gangs and who has found a long lost treasure trove of silver. More confusion, all the main Another great Erast Petrovich Fandorin novel. Two Moscow gangs who prey on the local population are pitted against each other as they try to extort a living from the pimps, whores and shopkeepers in the district. To further the confusion, the police are also on the take. A series of gruesome murders brings Erast Fandorin into the story. He has Masa befriend a local orphan, Senka, who has joined one of the gangs and who has found a long lost treasure trove of silver. More confusion, all the main characters are in some way involved with Death, a beautiful cocaine addicted courtesan, who is the lover of both the leaders of the gangs, and of the police superintendant and his deputy, and is also loved by Senka. This is a wonderfully noir novel. Can Fandorin sort out the two gangs, return the silver to the Mint, save Senka from the revenge of his former gang leader as well as saving Death from death, which she believes is the just fate of all her corrupt lovers? Perhaps it is even too hard for Fandorin...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Another typical Fandorin mystery. It hits the notes you expect and doesn't have too many twists or surprises like the other books. Senka is a fun addition to the cast of characters. I wonder if he continues on in The Diamond Chariot. I think what I would like best is a book from Erast's point of view. The last 3 books have been from a outsider's view of Masa and Erast. It's feeling repetitive. Erast seemed very remote and distant in this book. Of course, Senka bonded with Masa rather than Erast. Another typical Fandorin mystery. It hits the notes you expect and doesn't have too many twists or surprises like the other books. Senka is a fun addition to the cast of characters. I wonder if he continues on in The Diamond Chariot. I think what I would like best is a book from Erast's point of view. The last 3 books have been from a outsider's view of Masa and Erast. It's feeling repetitive. Erast seemed very remote and distant in this book. Of course, Senka bonded with Masa rather than Erast. There are some great scenes there. But I think Erast wasn't the Erast we all love. He seemed off his game or rather Senka didn't see him as we do from the other books. Although this is a companion piece to She Lover of Death, there's not much to link the two. Erast vaguely refers to another case and Senka does spot Columbine. However, you could really read the 2 books without realizing they go together. Off to the next adventure, I love reading them all and recommend everyone to read the tales of Fandorin.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katerina

    This is the 9th book of Erast Fandorin's adventures and it is taking place the same time as the 8th book with a similar title (She lover of Death). It was good luck to read them together, as I have not read this series in an order. The previous book was not that good (see for my review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) BUT this one is again back to old good Fandorin. The central character is a small boy, an urchin. He has had really difficult life, and is living in the darkest neigh This is the 9th book of Erast Fandorin's adventures and it is taking place the same time as the 8th book with a similar title (She lover of Death). It was good luck to read them together, as I have not read this series in an order. The previous book was not that good (see for my review here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) BUT this one is again back to old good Fandorin. The central character is a small boy, an urchin. He has had really difficult life, and is living in the darkest neighbourhood of Moscow, but his luck turns due to two incidents. One of them is meeting Erast Noname (this is the surname he uses in this book). Death is the nickname of a lady and the young Senka is falling in love with her. And the story goes around him and her, but it is definitely not a love story. A small detail for the book: Erast is not an official anymore, but an eccentric engineer trying to drive his automobile from Moscow to Paris to get a record.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    Reading this book I was already well familiar with Erast Fandorin series and was expecting another enjoyable read. This mystery is described by the author as a Dickensenian mystery and is told from the point of view of a young orphan making his way in the criminal Moscow. Easy parallels with Oliver Twist and Great Expectations do not need to be mentioned. I would give this book 5 stars versus the previous one that I enjoyed slightly less. Here the speed of narration, character depth, mystery twi Reading this book I was already well familiar with Erast Fandorin series and was expecting another enjoyable read. This mystery is described by the author as a Dickensenian mystery and is told from the point of view of a young orphan making his way in the criminal Moscow. Easy parallels with Oliver Twist and Great Expectations do not need to be mentioned. I would give this book 5 stars versus the previous one that I enjoyed slightly less. Here the speed of narration, character depth, mystery twists and language are just at the top of what we expect from the series. Very fast read and something I might want to re-read on a beach vacation.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elina

    Senka is a fascinating main character first, but unfortunately, like narrator-characters in many previous Fandorin books, he turns rather annoying. This, howver, may be because of the utter perfection of Erast Petrovitsh. He doesn't get much development in these later books, but you can't help being intrigued by him. Reader should have a little patient before Erast's full appearance but it is a good one. The story is exciting, full of twists and turns typical of Fandorin stories, and the novel ca Senka is a fascinating main character first, but unfortunately, like narrator-characters in many previous Fandorin books, he turns rather annoying. This, howver, may be because of the utter perfection of Erast Petrovitsh. He doesn't get much development in these later books, but you can't help being intrigued by him. Reader should have a little patient before Erast's full appearance but it is a good one. The story is exciting, full of twists and turns typical of Fandorin stories, and the novel can easily be read in one go.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hudson Murrell

    I was a bit skeptical of the title after the previous novel of near-same appellation, but was happily surprised. Took a long while to get into it, but I enjoy Akunin's way of centering the action around a character that is mildly close to Fandorin. Fandorin didn't appear (except for one paragraph) until almost 1/3 of the way into the book. Thankfully, all the background information was essential, and didn't detract. I was a bit skeptical of the title after the previous novel of near-same appellation, but was happily surprised. Took a long while to get into it, but I enjoy Akunin's way of centering the action around a character that is mildly close to Fandorin. Fandorin didn't appear (except for one paragraph) until almost 1/3 of the way into the book. Thankfully, all the background information was essential, and didn't detract.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    The Lover of Death , tenth volume of Erast Fandorin series. It's 1900 in Moscow and Fandorin hidden under the name Nameless searches for the treasure hidden in basements. There is a young woman called the Death - cause her lovers die in weird cirumstances - connected to the case. The Death has a little helper, Sienka, who wants to get to the gang of Prince, the Death's lover. Great. The Lover of Death , tenth volume of Erast Fandorin series. It's 1900 in Moscow and Fandorin hidden under the name Nameless searches for the treasure hidden in basements. There is a young woman called the Death - cause her lovers die in weird cirumstances - connected to the case. The Death has a little helper, Sienka, who wants to get to the gang of Prince, the Death's lover. Great.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kris McCracken

    The events of this novel occur contemporaneously with the events of She Lover of Death. This time, Senka, a street urchin from the slums mixed up in a run of dangerous criminal activities, is our narrator. Another fine addition to the series, and I'm both looking forward to the lead up to the Revolutions, but am already grieving for the loss of our heroes... The events of this novel occur contemporaneously with the events of She Lover of Death. This time, Senka, a street urchin from the slums mixed up in a run of dangerous criminal activities, is our narrator. Another fine addition to the series, and I'm both looking forward to the lead up to the Revolutions, but am already grieving for the loss of our heroes...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary C

    I didn't hate this one one but I didn't like it nearly as much as the other Erast Fandorin books. It didn't even feel like a Fandorin book to me. I didn't really care for She Lover of Death either. I might have liked it better if it wasn't listed as part of the Fandorin series and was happily surprised by a Fandorin cameo in the book. I didn't hate this one one but I didn't like it nearly as much as the other Erast Fandorin books. It didn't even feel like a Fandorin book to me. I didn't really care for She Lover of Death either. I might have liked it better if it wasn't listed as part of the Fandorin series and was happily surprised by a Fandorin cameo in the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Georgia Carvalho

    I hope Erast Fandorin keeps having adventures forever! I love how clever and funny the books are, I love the disguises, I love the collection of social misfits and street urchins, I am fascinated by turn of the century Russia in all its inequality and craziness, and even love his stammer. As satisfying as Sherlock Holmes.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Darya Conmigo

    Okay, I take back my words about the previous book of the series, "She lover of death." After you read this one, it all just comes together in a very nice (and a very Akunin-like) way. So, don't make a mistake: read both books, "She Lover of Death" and "The Lover of Death." It is really one piece. Okay, I take back my words about the previous book of the series, "She lover of death." After you read this one, it all just comes together in a very nice (and a very Akunin-like) way. So, don't make a mistake: read both books, "She Lover of Death" and "The Lover of Death." It is really one piece.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ashok

    Yet another romp in late 19th century Moscow. This time around most of the plot is set in the Khitrovka slums of moscow, and the narrator is an orphan who falls in with a femme-fatale. There is a serial killer on the loose and only Fandorin can save the day. Fun as usual!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shea

    #iLove this book! Boris Akunin is comparable to Arthur Conan Doyle. His characters are well developed and the storyline is very interesting. One can learn a lot from this single book. I'm definitely going to hunt for his other books. #iLove this book! Boris Akunin is comparable to Arthur Conan Doyle. His characters are well developed and the storyline is very interesting. One can learn a lot from this single book. I'm definitely going to hunt for his other books.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.