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The Evil That Men Do

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Dorothy Martin and her husband, retired Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt, are on holiday in the idyllic English village of Broadway when they stumble across the body of a man who appears to have fallen down a disused quarry. When it is revealed that the man, a local farmer, was probably pushed over the edge, and that the police have failed to find any suspects or motives for t Dorothy Martin and her husband, retired Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt, are on holiday in the idyllic English village of Broadway when they stumble across the body of a man who appears to have fallen down a disused quarry. When it is revealed that the man, a local farmer, was probably pushed over the edge, and that the police have failed to find any suspects or motives for the murder, Dorothy can't help but get involved. A strange encounter with a fellow holidaymaker just before they discovered the corpse arouses her suspicion, and she and Alan set out to solve the case, but not without great risk to the safety of Dorothy herself.


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Dorothy Martin and her husband, retired Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt, are on holiday in the idyllic English village of Broadway when they stumble across the body of a man who appears to have fallen down a disused quarry. When it is revealed that the man, a local farmer, was probably pushed over the edge, and that the police have failed to find any suspects or motives for t Dorothy Martin and her husband, retired Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt, are on holiday in the idyllic English village of Broadway when they stumble across the body of a man who appears to have fallen down a disused quarry. When it is revealed that the man, a local farmer, was probably pushed over the edge, and that the police have failed to find any suspects or motives for the murder, Dorothy can't help but get involved. A strange encounter with a fellow holidaymaker just before they discovered the corpse arouses her suspicion, and she and Alan set out to solve the case, but not without great risk to the safety of Dorothy herself.

30 review for The Evil That Men Do

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Author Jeanne M. Dams’ 11th novel to feature American ex-pat Dorothy Martin and her English husband Alan Nesbit, retired Chief Constable of the Belleshire Constabulary, isn’t bad. It’s just such a let-down from its predecessor, A Dark And Stormy Night, which was a pure delight. Dorothy and Allen take a well-deserved holiday to the real-life village of Broadway in the Cotswolds. While they’re there, a deaf farmer is shoved to his death, and the curious couple begin snooping. But, with an over-the- Author Jeanne M. Dams’ 11th novel to feature American ex-pat Dorothy Martin and her English husband Alan Nesbit, retired Chief Constable of the Belleshire Constabulary, isn’t bad. It’s just such a let-down from its predecessor, A Dark And Stormy Night, which was a pure delight. Dorothy and Allen take a well-deserved holiday to the real-life village of Broadway in the Cotswolds. While they’re there, a deaf farmer is shoved to his death, and the curious couple begin snooping. But, with an over-the-top villain and too many threads, The Evil That Men Do wasn’t up to Dams’ usual standard.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gerry

    The best thing to say about 'The Evil That Men Do' is that it is instantly forgettable, once read it passes very quickly out of one's mind and a few days later one wonders what it was all about. This is a trifle sad to say because the Cotswold setting is nicely portrayed but the two characters, Dorothy Martin and Alan Nesbitt, the latter a retired chief constable, are very bland. In addition the plot is somewhat garbled and the ending (if I remember correctly) is very loose. The couple are on a w The best thing to say about 'The Evil That Men Do' is that it is instantly forgettable, once read it passes very quickly out of one's mind and a few days later one wonders what it was all about. This is a trifle sad to say because the Cotswold setting is nicely portrayed but the two characters, Dorothy Martin and Alan Nesbitt, the latter a retired chief constable, are very bland. In addition the plot is somewhat garbled and the ending (if I remember correctly) is very loose. The couple are on a walking tour of the Cotswolds and on one of their rambles they stumble across a body of a man who appears to have fallen into a disused quarry. But was it an accident, was he pushed or was it a suicide? Dorothy and Alan set out to find out, armed with the fact that, just before they discovered the corpse, they encountered a fellow holidaymaker in somewhat bizarre circumstances. So bizarre indeed that Dorothy feels sure that he has something to do with the death of the man in the quarry. A long, drawn out investigation follows but eventually (thank goodness) Dorothy and Alan, having put themselves in great danger more than once, finally discover the truth and they settle back to get ready for their next case, which is one that I will probably give a miss to.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michell Karnes

    Great as always! I love the characters dorothy and alan. Where can I find a husband like that? Ha Ha. Dorothy is such a likable character, maybe because I myself am getting older but I love her age related issues (creaky knees, plumpness). I hope the author keeps cranking these out.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Thank you NYPL! I love the Dorothy Martin mysteries but had hit a dry spell with availability in my local libraries. I can now continue enjoying this series! Dorothy, an amateur investigator, manages to get involved in "assisting" local law enforcement in solving crimes. Married to a retired chief inspector, she is encouraged by her husband in her "Mrs. Marple" crime solving and is very successful in her investigations. Thank you NYPL! I love the Dorothy Martin mysteries but had hit a dry spell with availability in my local libraries. I can now continue enjoying this series! Dorothy, an amateur investigator, manages to get involved in "assisting" local law enforcement in solving crimes. Married to a retired chief inspector, she is encouraged by her husband in her "Mrs. Marple" crime solving and is very successful in her investigations.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Chase

    A nice little tea cozy of a book. It is the 11th in a series - not the best place to start. If I had read the 1st book I would already by the 11th know and love her characters. Best thing in the book was her description of the highest English level 'security alert' as "really rather cross." A nice little tea cozy of a book. It is the 11th in a series - not the best place to start. If I had read the 1st book I would already by the 11th know and love her characters. Best thing in the book was her description of the highest English level 'security alert' as "really rather cross."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    The Evil That Men Do by Jeanne M. Dams. Dorothy Martin and her husband Ret. Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt have decided to see the English village of Broadway in the Cotswolds. Touring on their own visiting the lovely small shopping areas and pubs as well as those cozy homes the Cotswolds is famous for is something they've out off for far too long. The climbing over hill and dale is not exactly what the doctor ordered for Dorothy's replaced knees. It's more of a struggle to keep up with Alan than a The Evil That Men Do by Jeanne M. Dams. Dorothy Martin and her husband Ret. Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt have decided to see the English village of Broadway in the Cotswolds. Touring on their own visiting the lovely small shopping areas and pubs as well as those cozy homes the Cotswolds is famous for is something they've out off for far too long. The climbing over hill and dale is not exactly what the doctor ordered for Dorothy's replaced knees. It's more of a struggle to keep up with Alan than a vacation. Then as Alan moves ahead of Dorothy while on one of their walking excursions, he spots it. Down below him Alan spies a body. the body of a man. And so the mystery begins...how did the man fail to see the edge of this precipice. Was it suicide or could it be murder. This story becomes more involved as they meet a young lad with fear in his eyes who vanishes as fast as he appeared. Terrific reading that held my interest...and oh yes, a lovely new attention to the family.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Not as satisfying as some of her other books. The mystery itself was quite weak--it's really the sleuth, her husband, and England itself that you really enjoy in this outting of the series. Not as satisfying as some of her other books. The mystery itself was quite weak--it's really the sleuth, her husband, and England itself that you really enjoy in this outting of the series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    Another summer holiday, another mysterious murder that Dorothy Martin feels compelled to investigate. While she and her husband enjoy a week in the Cotswolds, one of their wanders leads them to a dead body, that of a elderly farmer without an enemy in the world, according to the village of Broadway. What could be his connection with the pleasant young man who bumped into Dorothy in abject terror on the main street that very afternoon? The main thing I like about this series is the 'travelogue' th Another summer holiday, another mysterious murder that Dorothy Martin feels compelled to investigate. While she and her husband enjoy a week in the Cotswolds, one of their wanders leads them to a dead body, that of a elderly farmer without an enemy in the world, according to the village of Broadway. What could be his connection with the pleasant young man who bumped into Dorothy in abject terror on the main street that very afternoon? The main thing I like about this series is the 'travelogue' that goes with it. The little towns of England sound very enticing indeed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elliott

    I certainly did not expect this amount of danger and violence to be in what is classed as a “cozy.” No Miss Marple resolution here. I suppose all the quaint English countryside and local color might have something to do with the classification. The other problem was motivation. Yes, the villain was a very bad man, even a sociopath, but what led him to embark on his murderous path? Perhaps you don’t have to answer that when you are dealing with a sociopath. It was a gripping read, as one can see I certainly did not expect this amount of danger and violence to be in what is classed as a “cozy.” No Miss Marple resolution here. I suppose all the quaint English countryside and local color might have something to do with the classification. The other problem was motivation. Yes, the villain was a very bad man, even a sociopath, but what led him to embark on his murderous path? Perhaps you don’t have to answer that when you are dealing with a sociopath. It was a gripping read, as one can see by the short amount of time it took to get through, but rather unsatisfying in the end.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Liisa

    3-1/2 rounded up to 4*'s.... 3-1/2 rounded up to 4*'s....

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Another winner. Good ending.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    The Evil That Men Do is the next installment of the Dorothy Martin mystery series by Jeanne M. Dams (I'm reading her most recent three to get caught up in the series and to fulfill a square on the Book Bingo challenge). In this outing, Dorothy and her husband, Alan Nesbitt, are on a walking holiday in the Cotswalds. They take a break from their tour to stay at a lovely little bed and breakfast in the beautiful little town of Broadway--making short day-trip walks from their "home base." On one of The Evil That Men Do is the next installment of the Dorothy Martin mystery series by Jeanne M. Dams (I'm reading her most recent three to get caught up in the series and to fulfill a square on the Book Bingo challenge). In this outing, Dorothy and her husband, Alan Nesbitt, are on a walking holiday in the Cotswalds. They take a break from their tour to stay at a lovely little bed and breakfast in the beautiful little town of Broadway--making short day-trip walks from their "home base." On one of their day trips, Alan spots the body of a man who has apparently fallen over the edge of an abandoned quarry. Shortly after calling the authorities and making their way back to town, Dorothy is nearly run over by a distracted young man who has been staying at the same b&b. Once explanations and apologies are made, the couple take an instant liking to him. They are dismayed when the police reveal that the man in the quarry was pushed, the young man disappears, and suspicion immediately falls on their new friend. Dorothy can't resist getting involved and soon she and Alan discover that there is far more to the story than anyone could imagine. It all ends with an exciting rescue from an abandoned farm involving an intrepid taxi driver and a heroic spaniel. While I still like the characters of Dorothy and her husband very much and Dams introduce some very likeable supporting characters, this mystery isn't quite up to the standard of her previous work. Dorothy supposedly has the charm to get people to talk to her, but there is a great deal of time spent in which people do NOT talk to her and she learns very little. There is also the difficulty in believing her involvement in the ending. She's not the most athletic senior citizen in the world (and is still breaking in her newly-replaced knees) and yet she can perform the feats detailed in the the grand finale? (Sorry to be so vague, but I don't want to give the ending away.) I'm not buying. The mystery itself isn't quite as satisfying, although Dams does set the clues fairly well--and like Dorothy I felt like I should have realized who the villain really was a lot sooner. I think the story would have worked just as well (if not better) if we'd lost the rock musician story line. Over all, a fair read with good characters. Two and a half stars. This was first posted on my blog My Reader's Block.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jodie "Bookish" Cook

    Book Review Title: The evil that men do Author: Jeanne M. Dams Genre: Horror/Crime Rating: ** Review: A retired Chief Constable and his American spouse are enjoying the beauties of a holiday in the Cotswolds when they stumble upon a body. Despite Alan’s Nesbitt’s unofficial status, he and Dorothy Martin are no strangers to sleuthing (A Dark and Stormy Night, 2011, etc.). So it’s no surprise that while they’re staying in a B&B in the picture-perfect English village of Broadway and enjoying hiking the c Book Review Title: The evil that men do Author: Jeanne M. Dams Genre: Horror/Crime Rating: ** Review: A retired Chief Constable and his American spouse are enjoying the beauties of a holiday in the Cotswolds when they stumble upon a body. Despite Alan’s Nesbitt’s unofficial status, he and Dorothy Martin are no strangers to sleuthing (A Dark and Stormy Night, 2011, etc.). So it’s no surprise that while they’re staying in a B&B in the picture-perfect English village of Broadway and enjoying hiking the countryside, they find a body in a quarry. The couple becomes concerned about Paul Jones, a young fellow guest who seems to be in fear of something. Hoping that he has nothing to do with the death of the seemingly blameless farmer, Dorothy decides that they must investigate when Paul vanishes. The sleuths meet Jo Carter, who claims to be an old family friend of Paul, and eventually learn that the young man, under a different name, is a budding pop star whose family once had to go into hiding to escape from a particularly nasty and abusive ex-husband and stepfather. Paul recognized him but has no idea what name he may be using or whether he even lives in the Cotswolds. Although Paul is eventually found, Jo disappears. Has she too become a victim? Renting a cottage as a base for exploration, the couple takes in a lost and starving dog, who provides a handy excuse to visit outlying farms looking for Jo. Although the police are searching, Dorothy is the one who faces the greatest danger. Anglophiles and series fans will forgive the fact that Alan and Dorothy spend a lot more time extolling the beauties of the English countryside than solving the crimes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    Dorothy Martin and her husband retired Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt take a holiday in the English village of Broadway in the Cotswolds. While walking, Dorothy is almost struck by a young man riding a motorcycle. This is foreshadowing for all the woes that befall them starting with finding the body of a man in a marble quarry. She is once again caught up in a murder mystery. The man was a farmer who was pushed over the edge, and, of course, Dorothy determines to find the guilty person. Little doe Dorothy Martin and her husband retired Chief Constable Alan Nesbitt take a holiday in the English village of Broadway in the Cotswolds. While walking, Dorothy is almost struck by a young man riding a motorcycle. This is foreshadowing for all the woes that befall them starting with finding the body of a man in a marble quarry. She is once again caught up in a murder mystery. The man was a farmer who was pushed over the edge, and, of course, Dorothy determines to find the guilty person. Little does she know that she will end up being pursued by the man who killed the man herself.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    American Dorothy Martin and her husband, retired chief constable Alan Nesbitt, are on a walking tour of the Cotswolds when Alan finds a dead body in a quarry. Although Alan is no longer an active policeman, he and Dorothy are drawn into the investigation when suspicion falls on a young man staying in their bed and breakfast, someone they've met and liked. This cozy has a slam-bang suspenseful ending, too. American Dorothy Martin and her husband, retired chief constable Alan Nesbitt, are on a walking tour of the Cotswolds when Alan finds a dead body in a quarry. Although Alan is no longer an active policeman, he and Dorothy are drawn into the investigation when suspicion falls on a young man staying in their bed and breakfast, someone they've met and liked. This cozy has a slam-bang suspenseful ending, too.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    I couldn't put this book down. It brought into play the theme of domestic violence and built quite a story around it. I enjoyed watching Dorothy mentally put herself in someone else's place in several instances and come up with important clues to what happened. I love the affectionate but not overly perfect interaction between Dorothy and her husband Alan. Somehow, Alan always manages to show up just in time when Dorothy ends up in an emergency situation. Very satisfying! I couldn't put this book down. It brought into play the theme of domestic violence and built quite a story around it. I enjoyed watching Dorothy mentally put herself in someone else's place in several instances and come up with important clues to what happened. I love the affectionate but not overly perfect interaction between Dorothy and her husband Alan. Somehow, Alan always manages to show up just in time when Dorothy ends up in an emergency situation. Very satisfying!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jane Irish Nelson

    This is book is very hard to put down. Alan and Dorothy set out on a walking tour of the Cotswolds and fall into a mystery, involving a young man staying at their B-and-B. He seems nervous and scared, and Dorothy becomes worried when he disappears, especially after Alan discovers a body in an old quarry while they are out walking. Could there be any connection between the two? Another excellent mystery in a very enjoyable series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen Blinn

    Dorothy Martin is off on a walking tour, and unexplained events occur. Of course, Dorothy and her husband Alan feel the need to investigate and offer their own special brand of expertise to local law enforcement officers. This time it nearly spells the end of our hero, Dorothy, when she has a very close escape near the end of the book. This is a good way to while away a few long winter evenings!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Although Dams is an American, she writes in the vein of traditional British mysteries. The main character, Dorothy Martin, could be mistaken for the younger married sister of Miss Jane Marple. While the Dorothy was a bit too Marpleish, I thought Dams did an outstanding job of describing the countryside.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Good things: Cosy, benign, mildly entertaining, I love the UK. Bad things: They are constantly eating at some pub, at home, a restaurant, having a picnic and drinking bourbon and tea. There is more about food and drink in this book than about the actual murder. There are so few clues and so little mystery. You can't attempt to solve it like an Agatha. Good things: Cosy, benign, mildly entertaining, I love the UK. Bad things: They are constantly eating at some pub, at home, a restaurant, having a picnic and drinking bourbon and tea. There is more about food and drink in this book than about the actual murder. There are so few clues and so little mystery. You can't attempt to solve it like an Agatha.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I love dorothy and her husbands life in england !!! Weaker than some .... But jeanne dams lives in my town and gave a talk at our library once and was fantastic !! Didnt read about dorothys hats in this one ..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christian Evans

    I enjoy books by this author. English Cozy Mystery is one of my favorite type of reads. Jeanne M. Dams uses areas in the UK such as the Cotswolds, Iona, Cornwall in her books. I would recommend her books for a cold winter evening, fire in the fireplace and a cuppa of tea.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    This one went on a little too long. And I thought the villian came out of left field and then the violence in the end was, well, a bit too violent. At least for this author it was. Not one of her best efforts, but still a good read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barbra

    Did not enjoy this book as much as her previous other ones, maybe because of the story line. I normally do not read books about abusive men or women, I know it happens but it is something I don't like to read before going to sleep. Did not enjoy this book as much as her previous other ones, maybe because of the story line. I normally do not read books about abusive men or women, I know it happens but it is something I don't like to read before going to sleep.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    This was a nice "cozy", taking place in the Cotswolds, and good addition to the series. This was a nice "cozy", taking place in the Cotswolds, and good addition to the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stella

    I've enjoyed this series up to this installment. This was just awful. I hope the next one is better. I've enjoyed this series up to this installment. This was just awful. I hope the next one is better.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sharneel

    A quick enjoyable read, this novel fills the bill for a British cozy mystery. I would read this author again for that escapism and British countryside tenor she captures.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    The only good thing about this book was the cover. Didn't get past page 5. The only good thing about this book was the cover. Didn't get past page 5.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    There are some mystery writers that I pick up at the library from time to time -- not my favorites, but usually a good few hours of reading. This one was lacking -- a bit boring. Not her best.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jacqui

    I enjoyed the latest in the Dorothy Martin cozy mystery series very much. Great descriptions of British scenery and people as well as exciting story.

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