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Men and Marriage

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"Timely when originally published, Men and Marriage is essential now given the the warlike climate of male-female relationships, unfortunately fostered by radical feminism." Rush Limbaugh Men and Marriage is a critical commentary that asks the burning question, How can society survive the pervasive disintegration of the family? A profound crisis faces modern social order as "Timely when originally published, Men and Marriage is essential now given the the warlike climate of male-female relationships, unfortunately fostered by radical feminism." Rush Limbaugh Men and Marriage is a critical commentary that asks the burning question, How can society survive the pervasive disintegration of the family? A profound crisis faces modern social order as traditional family relationships become almost unrecognizable. George Gilder's Men and Marriage is a revised and expanded edition of his 1973 landmark work, Sexual Suicide . He examines the deterioration of the family, the well-defined sex roles it offered, and how this change has shifted the focus of our society. Poverty, for instance, stems from the destruction of the family when unmarried parents are abandoned by their lovers or older women are divorced because society approves of their husbands' younger girlfriends. Gilder claims that men will only fulfill their paternal obligations when women lead them to do so, and that this civilizing influence, balanced with proper economic support, is the most important part of maintaining a productive, healthy, loving society. He offers a concrete plan for rebuilding the family in America. His solutions challenge readers to return to these roles and reestablish the family values that were once so crucial in staving off the ills that plague our country. Gilder insists that it is time to reexamine what "liberation" has wrought and at what cost. Only a return to traditional family values, he contends, can stem the tide of disaster. George Gilder is the author of Wealth and Poverty, the best-selling critique of Reaganomics, The Spirit of Enterprise, Visible Man, Naked Nomads, and The Party That Lost Its Head . He was a speechwriter for Ronald Reagan and now writes regularly for The Wall Street Journal and National Review about material advances and their effect on society. His most recent books include two other well-known social commentaries, Microcosm and Life After Television. Also available in paperback.


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"Timely when originally published, Men and Marriage is essential now given the the warlike climate of male-female relationships, unfortunately fostered by radical feminism." Rush Limbaugh Men and Marriage is a critical commentary that asks the burning question, How can society survive the pervasive disintegration of the family? A profound crisis faces modern social order as "Timely when originally published, Men and Marriage is essential now given the the warlike climate of male-female relationships, unfortunately fostered by radical feminism." Rush Limbaugh Men and Marriage is a critical commentary that asks the burning question, How can society survive the pervasive disintegration of the family? A profound crisis faces modern social order as traditional family relationships become almost unrecognizable. George Gilder's Men and Marriage is a revised and expanded edition of his 1973 landmark work, Sexual Suicide . He examines the deterioration of the family, the well-defined sex roles it offered, and how this change has shifted the focus of our society. Poverty, for instance, stems from the destruction of the family when unmarried parents are abandoned by their lovers or older women are divorced because society approves of their husbands' younger girlfriends. Gilder claims that men will only fulfill their paternal obligations when women lead them to do so, and that this civilizing influence, balanced with proper economic support, is the most important part of maintaining a productive, healthy, loving society. He offers a concrete plan for rebuilding the family in America. His solutions challenge readers to return to these roles and reestablish the family values that were once so crucial in staving off the ills that plague our country. Gilder insists that it is time to reexamine what "liberation" has wrought and at what cost. Only a return to traditional family values, he contends, can stem the tide of disaster. George Gilder is the author of Wealth and Poverty, the best-selling critique of Reaganomics, The Spirit of Enterprise, Visible Man, Naked Nomads, and The Party That Lost Its Head . He was a speechwriter for Ronald Reagan and now writes regularly for The Wall Street Journal and National Review about material advances and their effect on society. His most recent books include two other well-known social commentaries, Microcosm and Life After Television. Also available in paperback.

30 review for Men and Marriage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I don't feel, like some of the reviewers, like this book is dated at all, despite the fact it's a reworked book from the '70s. It deals with overarching principles of masculinity and femininity. Society as a whole truly seems to follow the patterns he lays out. In my life, i've observed how single young men struggle with the feelings of dispensibility and frustration; how single young women use their sexual superiority to build society or tear it down; how women define civilization; how men pres I don't feel, like some of the reviewers, like this book is dated at all, despite the fact it's a reworked book from the '70s. It deals with overarching principles of masculinity and femininity. Society as a whole truly seems to follow the patterns he lays out. In my life, i've observed how single young men struggle with the feelings of dispensibility and frustration; how single young women use their sexual superiority to build society or tear it down; how women define civilization; how men preserve and protect it when love transforms them. For women who are offended and feel his perspective too archaic, he certainly is NOT saying women don't belong in the workforce period. He merely emphasizes the disparaging role that radical feminism has played towards abolishing masculinity. I think it had wonderful things to say about the way women dominate/manage culture and the way men's place in society is usurped by radical feminism. His observation about the sacrifices of men in the Home Front chapter is particularly astute, imo. I reread almost every chapter as I felt i couldn't grasp it all the first time around. This has been the best descriptive and prescriptive commentary on gender roles I've ever read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    William Schrecengost

    Very good book on the roles of men and women in society taken from biological, sociological and anthropological evidences. He argues that family is the base economic unit (which he fleshes out more in his Wealth and Poverty). Society is based on the existence and continuance of the family unit. Men must give themselves up for their wives and children and be the provider and protector of the family. Women must give themselves up to their husbands and children, being the nurturer and caregiver, be Very good book on the roles of men and women in society taken from biological, sociological and anthropological evidences. He argues that family is the base economic unit (which he fleshes out more in his Wealth and Poverty). Society is based on the existence and continuance of the family unit. Men must give themselves up for their wives and children and be the provider and protector of the family. Women must give themselves up to their husbands and children, being the nurturer and caregiver, being the mother and homemaker. Families are formed by the mutual self-sacrifice of the husband and wife. This is what society is built on. It's what economics is built on. It is beautiful

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    The negative of this book for todays reader is that this book was written as an expanded version of a book he wrote called Sexual Suicide from 1973, this book was published in 1986. To pretend people are the same today as they were 25-35 years ago is a stretch, but there are many things that never really change and that we call human nature. What this book points out is that sexual promiscuity is the root cause on most of the downfalls in all societies. Men for the most part are providers, & prot The negative of this book for todays reader is that this book was written as an expanded version of a book he wrote called Sexual Suicide from 1973, this book was published in 1986. To pretend people are the same today as they were 25-35 years ago is a stretch, but there are many things that never really change and that we call human nature. What this book points out is that sexual promiscuity is the root cause on most of the downfalls in all societies. Men for the most part are providers, & protectors, the need to be those things are strong and when a women allows sexual intercourse to happen without marital commitment it is too easy for the man to remain irresponsible and in many cases become all the things that place undo drag on society. There is a negative placed on the feminist movement in this book and shows in his opinion what it has done to females, trying to make them more like males. Gilder takes to task the liberators showing why he thinks it is wrong to mess with what he calls the sexual constitution. There are many important issues discussed about the alliances between men and women, sex, the welfare state, biological differences etc. I came away from this book with many feelings of concern for our hedonistic culture but ultimately I know God is in control. As people remain in prideful destructive patterns of behavior it is those who have made wise choices that will sometimes suffer the consequences along with the unwise because we are often times linked through families, jobs, sports, church, or as taxpayers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    A really great book that was prophetic in so many ways. He addresses sodomy, broken homes, divorce, poverty, women in combat, and other sexual/gender issues. His chapter on combat alone is worth the book as he sees a future (my revised version was from 1989) where women are sent to the front lines of battle. He also understands that when a pattern of monogamy breaks down women suffer. God uses marriage to women to restrain men and their barbaric tendencies. When this is removed society becomes a A really great book that was prophetic in so many ways. He addresses sodomy, broken homes, divorce, poverty, women in combat, and other sexual/gender issues. His chapter on combat alone is worth the book as he sees a future (my revised version was from 1989) where women are sent to the front lines of battle. He also understands that when a pattern of monogamy breaks down women suffer. God uses marriage to women to restrain men and their barbaric tendencies. When this is removed society becomes a disaster and women pay. I would love to see an updated version of a this book or a book like it. He cites a lot of statistics and studies. I would enjoy seeing some of the more recent studies on things like divorce, poverty, sodomy, etc. incorporated into a book with similar themes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jake McAtee

    “ . . . as with all entrepreneurs, the odds are against them. But all human progress . . . depends on an entrepreneurial willingness to defy the odds. It is in the nuclear family that the most crucial process of capitalist defiance and faith is centered. “Here emerge the most indispensable acts of capital formation: the psychology of giving, saving, and sacrifice, in behalf of an unknown future, embodied in a specific child—a balky bundle of possibilities which will yield its social reward even “ . . . as with all entrepreneurs, the odds are against them. But all human progress . . . depends on an entrepreneurial willingness to defy the odds. It is in the nuclear family that the most crucial process of capitalist defiance and faith is centered. “Here emerge the most indispensable acts of capital formation: the psychology of giving, saving, and sacrifice, in behalf of an unknown future, embodied in a specific child—a balky bundle of possibilities which will yield its social reward even further into time than the most foresighted business plan. In this venture, few mothers—and no societies—can succeed without enlisting the fathers. “Marriage is the key to the connection of fathers to this central process in the creation of life and the production of wealth. The golden rule and perennial lesson of marriage is: Give and you will be given unto. It is the obvious message of motherhood. But societies thrive only to the extent that this maternal wisdom becomes as well the faith of the fathers.”

  6. 4 out of 5

    Suzannah

    I have mixed feelings about this book. On one hand, I didn't appreciate the author's overriding thesis, that women are naturally superior, naturally more moral, religious, unselfish, responsible, etc, than men. Gilder's claim that women are the only force inspiring men to defer their gratification and build civilisations rather than destroying them, and his evident expectation that civilisation will inevitably crumble in the absence of sexual virtue, seemed a little overstated to me. Women don't I have mixed feelings about this book. On one hand, I didn't appreciate the author's overriding thesis, that women are naturally superior, naturally more moral, religious, unselfish, responsible, etc, than men. Gilder's claim that women are the only force inspiring men to defer their gratification and build civilisations rather than destroying them, and his evident expectation that civilisation will inevitably crumble in the absence of sexual virtue, seemed a little overstated to me. Women don't have salvific power, thank God. On the other hand, I read the book with profit and I think a lot of other folks could too. While I hesitate to ascribe the cure for all the world's woes to strong marriage relationships, the book is basically a study of how moral breakdowns and the feminist agendas hurt people. It references a lot of statistics, facts, and studies of a kind that don't often see the light of day, including how radically the different sex hormones impact babies in the womb, not just when it comes to physique but also as regards the brain; how this difference is backed up by studies showing that men are naturally more aggressive and competitive in societies from all over the world, and so on. In our society we hear a whole lot about how men and women are basically the same, but this book does a great job of challenging that assumption. On top of the factual stuff, Gilder also frequently demonstrates a good deal of wisdom and insight; I came away from the book appreciating more than ever how important it is for men, particularly, to feel that they have a purpose and a mission in life. So, not a perfect book and certainly not one to be taken without a grain of salt, but helpful.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Ventura

    This really should be required reading for pastors right now. Gilder points out that the greatest victims of feminism and sexual liberation are women, and the only "winners" are powerful men. Since patriarchy is inescapable, the best thing for civilization is monogamous marriage in which the man commits his sexuality and all his accompanying energies to one woman and their children. Gilder demonstrates from a variety of angles how marriage brings out the best in both sexes and ultimately blesses This really should be required reading for pastors right now. Gilder points out that the greatest victims of feminism and sexual liberation are women, and the only "winners" are powerful men. Since patriarchy is inescapable, the best thing for civilization is monogamous marriage in which the man commits his sexuality and all his accompanying energies to one woman and their children. Gilder demonstrates from a variety of angles how marriage brings out the best in both sexes and ultimately blesses the world. Perhaps the most revolutionary act a young man can do right now is get married, stay married, and raise his children in the paideia of God.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This book is probably too politically incorrect to be written today, but that doesn't mean its lessons are any less timely than they were in the mid-1980s. Despite Gilder's conception of gender roles in society, his main thesis that it is the women who make civilization by taming men somehow sounds fresh. Of course all this sounds ridiculous to radicals because all they think about is external power. They see a few old men at the helm of major institutions in society and call it a patriarchy, fa This book is probably too politically incorrect to be written today, but that doesn't mean its lessons are any less timely than they were in the mid-1980s. Despite Gilder's conception of gender roles in society, his main thesis that it is the women who make civilization by taming men somehow sounds fresh. Of course all this sounds ridiculous to radicals because all they think about is external power. They see a few old men at the helm of major institutions in society and call it a patriarchy, failing to realize that their sort of power is inconsequential in the grand scheme of things. What makes civilization possible in the first place are the needs and wants of women and children. A man will only become tame and build for the future when he knows he can have a place in it with the woman he loves and the children he is assured are his. Otherwise he will do whatever he can to fulfill baser desires, lust and wanderlust, with ever growing frustration and futility. He will most likely join the ranks of radical and violent movements seeking to overturn the civilization that no longer has any need of him. The history of dying societies from the ancient Romans to the formation of groups like al Qaeda attests to what Harvey Mansfield calls "unemployed manliness," or male frustration run amok. Much of what Gilder has to say is bound to be misinterpreted, misrepresented, and misunderstood. Of course there are exceptions to his generalizations, great big ones in fact. Wives are not to become slaves to their husbands; in fact Gilder shows they have greater power over men than they know. Gilder is no MGTOW, as he is trying to bring the sexes together, not drive them apart. Although some of his arguments regarding homosexuality are a bit dated, and he waxes a bit too poetic for my tastes near the end, his central idea makes a lot of sense.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    I read an earlier form of this way back in the day (the earlier version was called Sexual Suicide). I may also have read the reissued book sometime as well, or at least I thought I had. I just now read it again for a book I am writing, and was struck by what a fertile book it is. What a good book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Logan Thune

    Anthropology and sociology on fire. A book best read by mature adults. Would recommend for pastors to read as well. Good on so many levels, with a few quirks.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Abbi

    This book was quoted several times in another book I read, so I felt compelled to read it, also. Even though it was penned awhile ago and not written from a Christian worldview, the insights into the destruction that the feminist movement has had on manhood (and womanhood and culture, in general) were surprisingly on point. Should the author publish an update, the statistics would be staggering. As the wife of one husband and as the mother of two sons, I care deeply about how culture assaults an This book was quoted several times in another book I read, so I felt compelled to read it, also. Even though it was penned awhile ago and not written from a Christian worldview, the insights into the destruction that the feminist movement has had on manhood (and womanhood and culture, in general) were surprisingly on point. Should the author publish an update, the statistics would be staggering. As the wife of one husband and as the mother of two sons, I care deeply about how culture assaults and fails to esteem biblical manhood.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Every once in a while, you read a book that changes the way you look at the world. This book was that worldview-changing text for me. It capped off 4 years of struggle to find meaning in the toxic ideologies of academia and at last allowed me to forever distance myself from that strange world. George Gilder's book attributes most of the ills of western society to the collapse of the modern family. Over 200 pages he details the importance of marriage in socializing men and covers a variety of the Every once in a while, you read a book that changes the way you look at the world. This book was that worldview-changing text for me. It capped off 4 years of struggle to find meaning in the toxic ideologies of academia and at last allowed me to forever distance myself from that strange world. George Gilder's book attributes most of the ills of western society to the collapse of the modern family. Over 200 pages he details the importance of marriage in socializing men and covers a variety of the failures caused by the war on that once-sanctified institution. Gilder provides suggestions for how to reverse this decline, but to most observers it will seem unlikely that any of them will be even entertained in the current political climate. Even so, Gilder's work is not devoid of hope: even if the rest of the world cannot be convinced to reconsider its abandonment of the family, individual men and women can make the choice to pursue the lifestyle that will provide them the greatest fulfillment and give their children the best chance at a good life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heather Denigan

    "It's all in Gilder." This is a really cool study of how men and women work; the way they view their work; their roles in society; their relationships with each other, with their children and families, with their community, with authority; what motivates a man vs. what motivates a woman. It's a satisfying analysis too: Gilder doesn't skim over things with psychobabble. Anyway, I've been able to apply Gilder's insights to current events, the unfolding lives of the people around me, my own family, "It's all in Gilder." This is a really cool study of how men and women work; the way they view their work; their roles in society; their relationships with each other, with their children and families, with their community, with authority; what motivates a man vs. what motivates a woman. It's a satisfying analysis too: Gilder doesn't skim over things with psychobabble. Anyway, I've been able to apply Gilder's insights to current events, the unfolding lives of the people around me, my own family, books and movies, as well as generational trends.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I read this book 25 years ago, but decided to re-read especially given the state of our current culture. I agree with almost everything he says. As a nation, we have become so focused on our individual desires that we don't consider how those individual desires can tear apart the fabric of a society. Just because you want something, doesn't make it right. We need to consider how we are designed as male and female and how best to serve that design instead of trying to deny it. I read this book 25 years ago, but decided to re-read especially given the state of our current culture. I agree with almost everything he says. As a nation, we have become so focused on our individual desires that we don't consider how those individual desires can tear apart the fabric of a society. Just because you want something, doesn't make it right. We need to consider how we are designed as male and female and how best to serve that design instead of trying to deny it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gerald

    explains our society better than anything I've ever read explains our society better than anything I've ever read

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Recommended by James Schall in Another Sort of Learning, Chapter 15, as one of Fourteen Books on the Value and Defense of Human Life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    Outstanding. This, together with Doug Wilson's 'Father Hunger', should be required reading for today's men. Outstanding. This, together with Doug Wilson's 'Father Hunger', should be required reading for today's men.

  18. 4 out of 5

    mpsiple

    Challenging, interesting, and well-written. Gilder makes several sweeping arguments about the nature of society and the sexes. He demonstrates, through multiple references to anthropological and sociological academic works, that the sexes are universally divided into societal roles (across time and geography). He goes on to argue that attempts to eliminate these differences or devalue the institutions of marriage and family as mere social constructs, open the way to degrading forces - primarily Challenging, interesting, and well-written. Gilder makes several sweeping arguments about the nature of society and the sexes. He demonstrates, through multiple references to anthropological and sociological academic works, that the sexes are universally divided into societal roles (across time and geography). He goes on to argue that attempts to eliminate these differences or devalue the institutions of marriage and family as mere social constructs, open the way to degrading forces - primarily the subjugation of the weak to a subset of powerful men. I did have a few problems with the book. At times, it is unclear where the academic sources end and his opinions begin. He assumes an evolutionary point of view. And he appears to believe (without supporting material) that women are higher moral beings than men. That said, his straight-talk about the sexes is refreshing (and perhaps eye-opening for many today). I'd recommend this for anyone interested in the differences between men and women, and their roles in society.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Theilen

    I was hoping for this to be a stimulating read but I didn’t really end up enjoying the book much. It didn’t take long for me to tire of the repeated references to a woman’s “sexual superiority” and a man’s need to “submit” to it, almost like that was somehow supposed to make a woman feel special and appease any of us who might think it’s unfair that women are called to submit to men in marriage. I see his point, I guess I just didn’t like how he worded it. Women don’t need to feel superior to fe I was hoping for this to be a stimulating read but I didn’t really end up enjoying the book much. It didn’t take long for me to tire of the repeated references to a woman’s “sexual superiority” and a man’s need to “submit” to it, almost like that was somehow supposed to make a woman feel special and appease any of us who might think it’s unfair that women are called to submit to men in marriage. I see his point, I guess I just didn’t like how he worded it. Women don’t need to feel superior to feel special. I do agree with the suggestion that women somehow “tame” men, in that the way she is created and the cycles she goes through as a woman is an avenue for a man to grow and change in his humanity for the better. The two sexes ground and inspire each other. I need to take a break from this topic. I’m burnt out.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David M.

    The contents of this book need to be considered and considered carefully. Gilder, writing decades ago, was seeing with razor sharp clarity where societal breakdown had been coming from and where it had been going. That being said, this book probably isn't for everyone. Gilder has a way with words, but he doesn't mince them. When he speaks of issues he sees, he speaks directly and without much censor. To sum it up, this is a sociological treatise on why a Biblical vision for marriage is crucial t The contents of this book need to be considered and considered carefully. Gilder, writing decades ago, was seeing with razor sharp clarity where societal breakdown had been coming from and where it had been going. That being said, this book probably isn't for everyone. Gilder has a way with words, but he doesn't mince them. When he speaks of issues he sees, he speaks directly and without much censor. To sum it up, this is a sociological treatise on why a Biblical vision for marriage is crucial to the stability of society. It hits the nail on the head. This gave some clarity of insight into our current cultural situation that I haven't found in such potent doses anywhere else.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sean Higgins

    Men and Marriage is both perfectly obvious and eerily prophetic, especially since it was published in 1986. Because Gilder doesn't work from the Bible's revelation, he can't celebrate fatherhood as a reflection of the Father, and he misses the purposeful and powerful call to men to be fruitful. Gilder sees marriage as a good thing for men (and women), but mostly as women tame the barbarians. Nevertheless he painstakingly shows how ugly and dangerous and sick societies get when they don't promote Men and Marriage is both perfectly obvious and eerily prophetic, especially since it was published in 1986. Because Gilder doesn't work from the Bible's revelation, he can't celebrate fatherhood as a reflection of the Father, and he misses the purposeful and powerful call to men to be fruitful. Gilder sees marriage as a good thing for men (and women), but mostly as women tame the barbarians. Nevertheless he painstakingly shows how ugly and dangerous and sick societies get when they don't promote and protect the bond of one man with one woman in marriage with kids to come and care for.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David Skinner

    Gilder is a prophet and demonstrably dismantles all tenets of the sexual revolution including all tenets of feminism. He shows through sociological studies and common sense that God created genders to be complementary of each other. I give it a 3 star rating because the first 1/3 of the book was incredible and even reference-worthy, but the rest of the book slowed way down and seemed less coherent than the initial burst of ideological intensity.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Luke Deacon

    Fantastic book. What makes men men and women women? What forms the basis of civilisation and culture? Why is monogamous marriage the absolute best thing for any society? Gilder takes his readers on a biological, statistical, and sociological exploration of men and women. Our current culture desperately needs to read books like this one.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Why do we have marriage? This book tells you, mostly by showing all the ways that the breakdown of marriage negatively affects society. Some data are bit outdated but given the perennial biological natures of men and women, just as relevant today (maybe more so).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pianoman051

    While it's easy for today's culture to call every sentence of this book "controversial", so be it, as the theme, research and conclusions are spot-on criticisms of our society's ills, Gilder offering the one and only antidote - men and marriage. While it's easy for today's culture to call every sentence of this book "controversial", so be it, as the theme, research and conclusions are spot-on criticisms of our society's ills, Gilder offering the one and only antidote - men and marriage.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Like everything Mr Gilder writes; brilliant.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    Insightful and pokey, which is a combination I enjoy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rusten

    Brilliant

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jun Sung

    My debt to this book is great; with time, it may grow greater still. Highly recommend.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marcás

    Men and Marriage provokes the kind of benevolent disturbance I associate with the likes of Chris Lasch and Berdyaev. Gilder makes clear that the 'socially constructed' is not directly therefore the 'false' but speaks often to our deeper and more noble identities, which are dynamic and involve becoming more by forming human conventions. He manages all this in well written prose and is a great story teller. George has enumerated many truths and morals in this particular story, leaning on well estab Men and Marriage provokes the kind of benevolent disturbance I associate with the likes of Chris Lasch and Berdyaev. Gilder makes clear that the 'socially constructed' is not directly therefore the 'false' but speaks often to our deeper and more noble identities, which are dynamic and involve becoming more by forming human conventions. He manages all this in well written prose and is a great story teller. George has enumerated many truths and morals in this particular story, leaning on well established facts about marriage and the family. Parts of our nature (and this is a Christian belief) are greater and call us beyond ourselves. The Imago Dei, as well as our spirits aren't disembodied in reality. They grow in the fertile soil of daily experience. Further, as any Christian should know- We are not our own. It's always about our interaction with God in call and response. Grace transcends the categories of many an anthropologist, evolutionary biologist, postmodern theorist or other. There is no reason why we shouldn't see this movement in our institutions as eschatological. As we try to properly order our lives in line with the call of being human and church in Christ. George shows this in one form- Pertaining to women making men more civilised and genuinely men. However, this basic thrust goes well beyond Gilder's fascinating vision. Christians aren't rigid naturalists, even when we can appreciate the sinfulness rooted in biology and natural organisms. It's ambiguous (see Fr David Tracy) and to everything a season. Society reflects various natures, some conducive to the Kingdom and elaborated upon by the scriptures and others ignoble. We shouldn't buy reductionist arguments- outrightly negative or even ostensibly positive. Men and Marriage highlights this. George shows how the institutions of our time are set up in line with the vision of central planners, 'compassionate' politicians whose religious views are more in line with Paul Gottfried's idea of secular theocracy: Therapeutic and managerial. Genrally speaking, and I loved the emphasis on this in the book, we should acknowledge the dynamic nature of the good life and realise that it involves many mysterious strands. (See Chris Lasch, especially on anthropology and Taleb on Antifragility as well)

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