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Pagan and Christian Rome

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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.


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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

30 review for Pagan and Christian Rome

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

    A book published in the 1800's that talks about architecture that was uncovered, and some of the history of the city of Rome. While I found it interesting, I think modern readers might find it less than compelling. A book published in the 1800's that talks about architecture that was uncovered, and some of the history of the city of Rome. While I found it interesting, I think modern readers might find it less than compelling.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/22153 BATTLE BETWEEN CONSTANTINE AND MAXENTIUS (From a painting by Giulio Romano, Francesco Penni and Raffaellino del Colle) The opening chapter deals with: The early adoption of Christianity not confined to the poorer classes.—Instances of Roman nobles who were Christians.—The family of the Acilii Glabriones.—Manius Acilius the consul.—Put to death because of his religion.—Description of his tomb, recently discovered.—Other Christian patricians.—How was it possible http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/22153 BATTLE BETWEEN CONSTANTINE AND MAXENTIUS (From a painting by Giulio Romano, Francesco Penni and Raffaellino del Colle) The opening chapter deals with: The early adoption of Christianity not confined to the poorer classes.—Instances of Roman nobles who were Christians.—The family of the Acilii Glabriones.—Manius Acilius the consul.—Put to death because of his religion.—Description of his tomb, recently discovered.—Other Christian patricians.—How was it possible for men in public office to serve both Christ and Cæsar?—The usual liberality of the emperors towards the new religion.—Nevertheless an open profession of faith hazardous and frequently avoided.—Marriages between Christians and pagans.—Apostasy resulting from these.—Curious discovery illustrating the attitude of Seneca's family towards Christianity.2—Christians in the army.—The gradual nature of the transformation of Rome.—The significance of the inscription on the Arch of Constantine.—The readiness of the early Church to adopt pagan customs and even myths.—The curious mixture of pagan and Christian conceptions which grew out of this.—Churches became repositories for classical works of art, for which new interpretations were invented.—The desire of the early Christians to make their churches as beautiful as possible.—The substitution of Christian shrines for the old pagan altars at street corners.—Examples of both.—The bathing accommodations of the pagan temples adopted by the Church.—Also the custom of providing public standards of weights and measures.—These set up in the basilicas.—How their significance became perverted in the Dark Ages.—The adoption of funerary banquets and their degeneration.—The public store-houses of the emperors and those of the popes.—Pagan rose-festivals and their conversion into a Christian institution.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Italo Italophiles

    A large section in the book is dedicated to the construction of the first and second Basilica of St. Peter. First Constantine's tribute to where St. Peter was crucified is described, and then the new basilica's construction is detailed. I found this to be the most fascinating section of the book. The second most interesting section is about the churches built over the homes that were used by Saints Peter and Paul when preaching to the early Christians in Rome. The author's enthusiasm for his subj A large section in the book is dedicated to the construction of the first and second Basilica of St. Peter. First Constantine's tribute to where St. Peter was crucified is described, and then the new basilica's construction is detailed. I found this to be the most fascinating section of the book. The second most interesting section is about the churches built over the homes that were used by Saints Peter and Paul when preaching to the early Christians in Rome. The author's enthusiasm for his subject is contagious. A picture of Rome through the ages emerges from his text. It is a living, breathing Rome, full of complex people from all around the Mediterranean Sea. He treats us to appropriate quotes from classical writers, popes, saints and historians. The reader comes away with a better understanding of the ancient Romans and the early Christians, but to fully appreciate the book the reader should have a basic grounding in the history of ancient Rome and in the Catholic faith. Only then can one really understand the links the author makes between Jerusalem and Rome, not least the recreation of the Via Dolorosa by Rome's town planners, to host the yearly Passion play. Please read my full and illustrated review at Italophile Book Reviews. http://italophilebookreviews.blogspot...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tara Lynn

    There's so much yet to be learned about the relative interconnection between pagan and early Christian beliefs, especially during their first manifestations in Ancient Rome. Theoretically, according to the Christian Bible, Christ did not actually set out to create a religion of his own, rather to reform the corruption that was starting to spread through certain sects of the Jewish faith. Chronologically, Christianity was practiced in earliest forms with a certain tide over of early Jewish and Ro There's so much yet to be learned about the relative interconnection between pagan and early Christian beliefs, especially during their first manifestations in Ancient Rome. Theoretically, according to the Christian Bible, Christ did not actually set out to create a religion of his own, rather to reform the corruption that was starting to spread through certain sects of the Jewish faith. Chronologically, Christianity was practiced in earliest forms with a certain tide over of early Jewish and Roman roots, as well as a healthy dose of Northern influence from the Gauls and the Saxons as invading tribes brought new influences to Rome. I found this text to be interesting, despite it's age, as the author backtracks to several moments in history where pagans and Christians co-existed in Rome, eventually taking and grafting pieces of each other to incorporate new elements of worship still practiced in the future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Justin Rose

    It is interesting to read this account which pre-dates 20th century criticism. The validity of events recorded in the Bible and early Christian tradition are generally assumed to be true. The questions dealt with in this book are more along the lines of the legitimacy and applicability of artifacts.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Evan Simpkins

    Im fascinated by tomb art. This is a great resource, but not just for that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Spiros Oikonomou

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yodyout

  9. 5 out of 5

    A.C.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stacie Huff

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Barber

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Robinson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fre

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Harris

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Ferry

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Nydegger

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Payne

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charles L.

  19. 4 out of 5

    420LoopyLeah

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ed Bonthron

  21. 4 out of 5

    BRANDY MCCALL

  22. 5 out of 5

    NormaCenva

  23. 5 out of 5

    David

  24. 5 out of 5

    Edward

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natalia Corres

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erik Schmitt

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jake

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Dzemske

  30. 5 out of 5

    NormaCenva

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