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Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 3 Limited Signed Edition

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This special edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 3 is strictly limited to 1,000 numbered copies, complete with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. -The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has beco This special edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 3 is strictly limited to 1,000 numbered copies, complete with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. -The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has become "the gold standard for archival comic strip reprints...The research and articles provide insight and context, and most importantly the glorious reproduction of the material has preserved these strips for those who knew them and offers a new gateway to adventure for those discovering them for the first time." - Scoop -


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This special edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 3 is strictly limited to 1,000 numbered copies, complete with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. -The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has beco This special edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 3 is strictly limited to 1,000 numbered copies, complete with bound-in bookplates, each signed by Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed. -The Library of American Comics is the world's #1 publisher of classic newspaper comic strips, with 14 Eisner Award nominations and three wins for best book. LOAC has become "the gold standard for archival comic strip reprints...The research and articles provide insight and context, and most importantly the glorious reproduction of the material has preserved these strips for those who knew them and offers a new gateway to adventure for those discovering them for the first time." - Scoop -

30 review for Bloom County: The Complete Library Volume 3 Limited Signed Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Megan Baxter

    Ah, Bloom County. I've been slowly picking up these collected editions over the last year or so, waiting for our local comic store to get remaindered versions in. At least, that's the way it had gone until a week or so ago, when I went in and found both the third and fourth available for $10 each, and then, a day later, the fifth! So now I have all of them, barring the Sunday comics collection. Woo! Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enfor Ah, Bloom County. I've been slowly picking up these collected editions over the last year or so, waiting for our local comic store to get remaindered versions in. At least, that's the way it had gone until a week or so ago, when I went in and found both the third and fourth available for $10 each, and then, a day later, the fifth! So now I have all of them, barring the Sunday comics collection. Woo! Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Another great collection of Breathed's middle years of his initial 10-year run of Bloom County. This one covers the '84 election and plenty of other seminal moments of 1980s politics and pop culture. And as with the other collections, it's amazing (and sometimes downright frightening) how much of the social commentary is still completely relevant, even over 30 years later. This collection actually includes the first sets of strips that I hadn't previously seen, either during their original newsp Another great collection of Breathed's middle years of his initial 10-year run of Bloom County. This one covers the '84 election and plenty of other seminal moments of 1980s politics and pop culture. And as with the other collections, it's amazing (and sometimes downright frightening) how much of the social commentary is still completely relevant, even over 30 years later. This collection actually includes the first sets of strips that I hadn't previously seen, either during their original newspaper publication or in collected editions. I found myself laughing out loud every few pages, which is about all one can ask from a comic strip. Of course, Bloom County always offered so much more, and Vol. 3 gives you the substance and heart that made the strip one of the all-time greats.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Solid but not as great as I've always been led to believe. Most of the jokes land and the it's a fun group of characters to spend some time with.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A joy to read. A favourite newspaper strip.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Earl Truss

    Oliver Wendell Jones and Binkley's anxiety closet. This is the year when I really started liking Bloom County.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brian Rogers

    He's as much in the groove on this one as he was in books 2 and 4, which is a stellar 6 year run on a strip that was obviously produced on such a constant adrenaline high chasing the last minute deadline. It's an amazing body of work and the cultural impact is undeniable. It's noted that Calvin and Hobbes started appearing about midway through this volume, and those two strips formed the two poles of genius on the comics pages for the next 5 years. Everyone else was just playing catch-up.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Some flat storylines that go on far too long. A lot of the humor is hack references and nothing clever. It feels like the fire of Volume 2 is gone. Far too many repetitions of jokes from earlier with no new spin. This volume seems like the stale version of Volume 2. Many of the jokes from the earlier in the comic come back, but seem to simply repeat themselves, rather than adding a new spin (with the exception of p. 60). Many of the jokes hinge on referencing a celebrity, but not in the inventive Some flat storylines that go on far too long. A lot of the humor is hack references and nothing clever. It feels like the fire of Volume 2 is gone. Far too many repetitions of jokes from earlier with no new spin. This volume seems like the stale version of Volume 2. Many of the jokes from the earlier in the comic come back, but seem to simply repeat themselves, rather than adding a new spin (with the exception of p. 60). Many of the jokes hinge on referencing a celebrity, but not in the inventive ways the comic has done so before. (Simply inserting a celebrity name is not clever unto itself.) Many plot lines go on far too long without offering any big laughs: (view spoiler)[ the Meadow Party, Bill the Cat joining a cult, or Oliver Wendell Jones’ new computer that walks around and worships the TV. (hide spoiler)] Each of the aforementioned are ideas where the humorous commentary is clear, but doesn’t offer any big punchlines (with the exception of p. 93). Other plot lines are hack...(view spoiler)[like Opus assaulting a mime. --- Standout strip: p. 149 middle (hide spoiler)]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    1 - p. 14 (July 16-18, 1984) - B&W 2 - p. 16 (July 22, 1984) - color 3 - p. 21 (August 2-4, 1984) - B&W 4 - p. 91 (January 13, 1985) - color 5 - p. 257 (January 27, 1986) - color Summary: This sequential comic strip series highlights the poignant opinions of Bloom and his animal friends. Each strip is political in nature and seems to parallel the key events of the time period (Note: This assumption is based on my best knowledge and the most recent edition of this comic strip owned by my library. It e 1 - p. 14 (July 16-18, 1984) - B&W 2 - p. 16 (July 22, 1984) - color 3 - p. 21 (August 2-4, 1984) - B&W 4 - p. 91 (January 13, 1985) - color 5 - p. 257 (January 27, 1986) - color Summary: This sequential comic strip series highlights the poignant opinions of Bloom and his animal friends. Each strip is political in nature and seems to parallel the key events of the time period (Note: This assumption is based on my best knowledge and the most recent edition of this comic strip owned by my library. It ends several months before I was born.). Visual Keywords: - multi-panel - sequential Text Style: Potential Readers: - adults - interested in politics Awards: - Pulitzer Prize Other: - It would be interesting to see more current cartoons from this series to see if I would be better able to understand the message. The use of animal characters did not make it any easier to understand the context.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carl Nelson

    Reading the "Bloom County" collected comics is a welcome trip down memory lane. Volume 3 contains some fantastic storylines: the election of 1984, Opus and Cutter John's ill-fated balloon chair mission to the Washington, DC and Opus' crash-induced amnesia, Bill the Cat's reanimation, Betty Ford Center stint, and dalliance with Jeane Kirkpatrick. One of my all-time favorite Bloom County storylines is the relationship between Oliver Wendell Jones and his Banana Jr. 6000 computer, from the first bl Reading the "Bloom County" collected comics is a welcome trip down memory lane. Volume 3 contains some fantastic storylines: the election of 1984, Opus and Cutter John's ill-fated balloon chair mission to the Washington, DC and Opus' crash-induced amnesia, Bill the Cat's reanimation, Betty Ford Center stint, and dalliance with Jeane Kirkpatrick. One of my all-time favorite Bloom County storylines is the relationship between Oliver Wendell Jones and his Banana Jr. 6000 computer, from the first blush of shiny new technology to final obsolescence. A Sunday strip features a fake advertisement advising parents to buy their children a personal computer or else they will join a heavy metal band, wear fishnets, and stick out their tongues all the way to their kneecaps--just like Gene Simmons, whose parents didn't get him a personal computer.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ubalstecha

    Again, volume three takes us back to Bloom County, where penguins talk and cats spy for the Russians. In this volume we have the disappearance of Cutter and Opus while on a mission to turn the South African ambassador black. We also get the reemergence of Opus, this time with amnesia. Milo and the Meadow party are also there, as are Steve Dallas and his mother. What is missing is Ms. Harlow, the perky school teacher and Cutter's on again/off again beau. And I miss her. Bloom County is considered Again, volume three takes us back to Bloom County, where penguins talk and cats spy for the Russians. In this volume we have the disappearance of Cutter and Opus while on a mission to turn the South African ambassador black. We also get the reemergence of Opus, this time with amnesia. Milo and the Meadow party are also there, as are Steve Dallas and his mother. What is missing is Ms. Harlow, the perky school teacher and Cutter's on again/off again beau. And I miss her. Bloom County is considered a classic because cartoonist Breathed commented on the news and trends of the day. It is easy to see this as the bridge between Doonsbury and the Daily Show. Breathed's tongue is firmly in his cheek and he enjoys making fun of everyone involved, including himself and his characters. A great collection.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Content - Hilarious. The characters are fully fledged. The plot lines are ridiculous and delightfully over the top. Sometimes Breathed's comments are just as funny as the strip. Most of the comics in this edition are frighteningly relevant to today. Mechanics - Some people complain about the drawings, but I love how silly the characters look. Especially the people who come into Opus' office to place adds in the personals section of the paper. The typography leaves a lot to be desired. For those Content - Hilarious. The characters are fully fledged. The plot lines are ridiculous and delightfully over the top. Sometimes Breathed's comments are just as funny as the strip. Most of the comics in this edition are frighteningly relevant to today. Mechanics - Some people complain about the drawings, but I love how silly the characters look. Especially the people who come into Opus' office to place adds in the personals section of the paper. The typography leaves a lot to be desired. For those looking for squeaky clean reads - There are language issues and sexual innuendo and descriptions of comic violence. The author loves to parody things so when something gets too violent he simply blanks out the screen and installs a written description instead in a fit of mock self censorship.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    Bloom County is on the upswing throughout this volume. So is the size of Opus's nose (which for my money was at its best in mid-2004) with the exception of the classic rhinoplasty storyline. Breathed mediates the strip's earlier bitchiness and enters his peak with hilarious, inventive, beautifully rendered stuff. A good starting place for new readers. The annotations haven't improved much over the last couple of volumes though. The author's still griping away and still constantly pointing out thi Bloom County is on the upswing throughout this volume. So is the size of Opus's nose (which for my money was at its best in mid-2004) with the exception of the classic rhinoplasty storyline. Breathed mediates the strip's earlier bitchiness and enters his peak with hilarious, inventive, beautifully rendered stuff. A good starting place for new readers. The annotations haven't improved much over the last couple of volumes though. The author's still griping away and still constantly pointing out things in the strip that editors wouldn't allow on the comic page anymore. That self-censorship could be either the cause or effect of the fact that the funny pages haven't been creatively or culturally relevant for decades, but it doesn't make hearing about it any more interesting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    I checked this out of the library a long time ago and started reading it. And just got stuck. I don't think Bloom County works reading it straight through all that well. It is interesting and funny. And sometimes even intellectually stimulating. And yet it is not all that compelling reading. And this contained quite a bit of my favorite character - Oliver Wendell Jones and the Banana Jr 6000. Unfortunately it also contained quite a bit of Bill the Cat who I never thought all that funny. Oh well, I checked this out of the library a long time ago and started reading it. And just got stuck. I don't think Bloom County works reading it straight through all that well. It is interesting and funny. And sometimes even intellectually stimulating. And yet it is not all that compelling reading. And this contained quite a bit of my favorite character - Oliver Wendell Jones and the Banana Jr 6000. Unfortunately it also contained quite a bit of Bill the Cat who I never thought all that funny. Oh well, perhaps the next volume will be better.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I loves me some Bloom County. This volume also has my favorite sequence where Opus and Cutter John crash land in the ocean while trying to cause trouble with the South African ambassador, Opus gets amnesia and thinks he was a man prior, and Bill the Cat turns out to be a Communist spy (after being a coked-out star and Rajneesh bagwan). Who knew?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    This is Bloom County at the height of its powers, from July 1984 to February 1986. Bill the Cat runs for President. Cutter John and Opus get lost in a flying wheelchair on a mission to zap the South African ambassador with a ray that turns him black, invented by Oliver Wendell Jones. Binkley's anxiety closet. Milo at the newspaper. Steve Dallas's mom. All sorts of fun stuff.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    The strip continues in great form for this period, which marks the midpoint of its life. As the author remarks in a number of the occasional notes appended to the strips, it was a much looser era back then in terms of what you could get away with in a strip running in a family newspaper and he took full advantage of it with genuinely funny results.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Bult

    These first six or seven years of Bloom County were just awesome, containing classics from my childhood that I’ll never forget. Looking back through each and ever daily strip, though, also reminded me of some I’d completely forgotten about, plus the first book let me see the early strips I missed, before my local papers had syndicated the comic.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    It's interesting to see what strips I remember from the original volumes, what strips they hadn't previously collected, and what strips I have a different view on now that I have a bit more understanding of politics (at least more so that I did as a 12 year old).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    I don't know if I just wasn't in the mood or what, but I didn't find myself laughing all that frequently reading this volume. There's some funny stuff, but Breathed seems to have settled into something of a glib, superficial pattern by this point.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Keith Jones

    It's really surprising how many comics have never been reprinted before. Remains very funny.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Loved it, yet in some undefinable way felt it was overall not quite as perfectly great as the first two volumes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura Lemay

    The third in the collected series, I found these strips more political and less charming than the previous books. Fewer really good laughs here, but still worth it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Just as I remembered it. Better, actually; even as a little dork, plenty of jokes went over my head at the time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob Hermanowski

    Breathed's wonderful '80's comic really hits new heights with this volume, and contains several strips that were so good I distinctly remember them from my first reading them in the newspaper!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Frank Taranto

    Funny,sick humor. Bloom County picked on everybody and made me laugh while doing so. Still does.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

    I loved it - like the first two. Breathed does a great job with his running story lines. I recommend it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The era of BC where I was hooked as a kid. I'm pretty sure that some of the strips in this volume were not previously reprinted - so many of them were absolutely burned into my brain already.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Weston Fosdeck

    Tatted Opus on my arm.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Foreshadowing, Your clue to quality entertainment. Still brilliant 25 years later.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alex Nagler

    Signed copy, numbered 211 of 500

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