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The Whitechapel Horrors

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Edward B. Hanna brings Sherlock Holmes stunningly back to life in this homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great creation. The Whitechapel Horrors, with its spellbinding story and atmospheric prose, is the best new Holmes adventure since Seven-Per-Cent Solution. Here Hanna imagines the characters anew, while maintaining the integrity of Conan Doyle's originals. Grotesque mu Edward B. Hanna brings Sherlock Holmes stunningly back to life in this homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great creation. The Whitechapel Horrors, with its spellbinding story and atmospheric prose, is the best new Holmes adventure since Seven-Per-Cent Solution. Here Hanna imagines the characters anew, while maintaining the integrity of Conan Doyle's originals. Grotesque murders are being committed on the streets of Whitechapel. Sherlock Holmes comes to believe the murders are the skillful work of one man, a man who earns the gruesome epithet of Jack the Ripper. As the investigation proceeds, Holmes realizes that the true identity of the Ripper puts much more at stake than merely catching a killer - the most fundamental British institutions may very well be threatened. He is faced with the most difficult decision he has ever made, a crisis of conscience that shakes him to his very core. Holmes must decide where his allegiance truly lies - with his code of honor as a detective and champion of justice, or with his strong feelings of patriotism and love of England. Hanna vividly evokes the atmosphere of Victorian London in all its great and sordid details: the gaslight lamps and hansom cabs, the rain in the streets, the smell of poverty, the people and their language, dress, and habits. The Whitechapel Horrors is vintage Holmes, a ripping good mystery worthy of the great detective and his eminent creator. You're sure to feel as though you are in the actual presence of the great sleuth, himself, and you will delight in this wonderful addition to the Watson chronicles.


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Edward B. Hanna brings Sherlock Holmes stunningly back to life in this homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great creation. The Whitechapel Horrors, with its spellbinding story and atmospheric prose, is the best new Holmes adventure since Seven-Per-Cent Solution. Here Hanna imagines the characters anew, while maintaining the integrity of Conan Doyle's originals. Grotesque mu Edward B. Hanna brings Sherlock Holmes stunningly back to life in this homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's great creation. The Whitechapel Horrors, with its spellbinding story and atmospheric prose, is the best new Holmes adventure since Seven-Per-Cent Solution. Here Hanna imagines the characters anew, while maintaining the integrity of Conan Doyle's originals. Grotesque murders are being committed on the streets of Whitechapel. Sherlock Holmes comes to believe the murders are the skillful work of one man, a man who earns the gruesome epithet of Jack the Ripper. As the investigation proceeds, Holmes realizes that the true identity of the Ripper puts much more at stake than merely catching a killer - the most fundamental British institutions may very well be threatened. He is faced with the most difficult decision he has ever made, a crisis of conscience that shakes him to his very core. Holmes must decide where his allegiance truly lies - with his code of honor as a detective and champion of justice, or with his strong feelings of patriotism and love of England. Hanna vividly evokes the atmosphere of Victorian London in all its great and sordid details: the gaslight lamps and hansom cabs, the rain in the streets, the smell of poverty, the people and their language, dress, and habits. The Whitechapel Horrors is vintage Holmes, a ripping good mystery worthy of the great detective and his eminent creator. You're sure to feel as though you are in the actual presence of the great sleuth, himself, and you will delight in this wonderful addition to the Watson chronicles.

30 review for The Whitechapel Horrors

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B) 75% | More than Satisfactory Notes: A Holmes reunion special. The Ripper crimes matter only as vehicle for a postmodernist exploration of Sherlockiana.

  2. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    One of the most crucial elements in the original Sherlock Holmes stories is the narration. Having Watson present, witnessing events and then capturing the quicksilver genius of Holmes in his sharp and unfussy prose, is of course massively important to the success of the tales. (As proof of this, see those later stories which Conan-Doyle had Holmes narrate. They are amongst the weakest.) The good Doctor is of course a reader substitute, there to have these wonderful deductions explained to him an One of the most crucial elements in the original Sherlock Holmes stories is the narration. Having Watson present, witnessing events and then capturing the quicksilver genius of Holmes in his sharp and unfussy prose, is of course massively important to the success of the tales. (As proof of this, see those later stories which Conan-Doyle had Holmes narrate. They are amongst the weakest.) The good Doctor is of course a reader substitute, there to have these wonderful deductions explained to him and make everything clear. Without Watson we’d be lost. It’s therefore curious that Edward B. Hanna – clearly something of an expert on Holmes/Watson – opts for a third person narration for his ‘Sherlock Holmes vs. Jack the Ripper’ tale. This decision unbalances the book right from the start. The narration floats around the action and characters, to the extent that at points we’re given access to Sherlock Holmes’ own thoughts and feelings – and that has the odd effect of making him a somewhat more real, but much smaller character. Yes, we get to know more of his habits and about his weariness at the end of the day, but seeing these private corners of the man is a bit like a magician showing the mechanics of his tricks. Anyone’s thoughts are mundane if you spend enough with them, and one thing that Sherlock Holmes isn’t normally is mundane. What’s more, Hanna opts for a very Nigel Bruce-esque slow and stupid Watson (who also harbours some fairly reactionary political views). At one point Watson thinks his assistance to Holmes is of “minimal, perhaps even questionable, value”. If that’s so, why would Holmes keep him around? Yes, the Conan-Doyle version does lack Sherlock’s genius, but he is a qualified doctor (therefore not totally stupid) and a decent man, and as such does lend a lot of help to Sherlock. They are a team after all. The book wears its knowledge heavily, weaving Holmes’s investigation into the Jack the Ripper timeline and around the existing canon of tales. (Hanna clearly liked to play The Game, whereby Holmes fans treat these adventures as real and date them to the Victorian calendar.) There are extensive notes at the end of the book, reminiscent of a Flashman novel, which show how much research the novelist has gone into. Unfortunately, what emerges the other side is some awfully pedestrian prose and some clunking expository dialogue, all leading up to a disappointingly weak ending. Given their closeness in proximity, Jack the Ripper and Sherlock Holmes are natural rivals, I just wish someone would produce a sharper telling of the tale.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Whitechapel Horrors by Edward B. Hanna plays at "What If?" What if Sherlock Holmes were a real person? (Gasp! Who could doubt it?) And what if he had investigated the horrible murders committed by Jack the Ripper? For surely, the Great Detective would have been called in on such a notorious case. There is no doubt that Hanna knew his Holmes. He was a long-time Holmes buff and a member of the Baker Street Irregulars. And he most definitely had done hi The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Whitechapel Horrors by Edward B. Hanna plays at "What If?" What if Sherlock Holmes were a real person? (Gasp! Who could doubt it?) And what if he had investigated the horrible murders committed by Jack the Ripper? For surely, the Great Detective would have been called in on such a notorious case. There is no doubt that Hanna knew his Holmes. He was a long-time Holmes buff and a member of the Baker Street Irregulars. And he most definitely had done his research in Ripper lore. Though a work of fiction, the novel is meticulously footnoted. Those who are well-acquainted with the Holmes canon may say, too much footnoting--he chooses to footnote material that anyone who knows the least bit about Holmes and Watson should know--but better too much than not enough. Hanna has used the Holmes canon and the facts of the terrible murders in 1888 and blended them into a dandy little tale. And it is very interesting to follow Holmes on the track of one of the most notorious killers of all time. Almost 300 pages long, the book flies by (I finished it in a little over the day) and I didn't want to put it down until I got to the end. Hanna gets almost everything right. Almost. I quibble with bits of his portrayal of Watson--I maintain that the doctor is too good-hearted to espouse some of the derogatory comments and prejudicial beliefs Hanna attributes to him. Yes, some of the comments about the poor and certain races living in London were true of the day--but surely Hanna could have presented those details without putting them in the mouth of the good doctor. Watson does in a lot of ways represent the stalwart British man of his time, but not in all ways. My other quibble is the ending--or rather the lack thereof. It is very disquieting to follow Holmes throughout the story and be left hanging at the end. We aren't told who the Great Detective believes Jack the Ripper to be and we are supposed to believe that at the end of the day Holmes doesn't even know. That Holmes is no more enlightened than the police. That is not the Holmes we know. Overall, a good tale. Hanna makes it very believable that Holmes could have investigated this case. And the blend of fact and fiction is very good. An enjoyable read worth three stars. {This review is mine and was first posted on my blog at http://myreadersblock.blogspot.com/20.... Please request permission to repost any portion. Thanks.}

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fred Hughes

    A rousing good tail that sputtered at the end. You can't go wrong with Jack the Ripper and Sherlock Holmes so all in all it was a pleasant read A rousing good tail that sputtered at the end. You can't go wrong with Jack the Ripper and Sherlock Holmes so all in all it was a pleasant read

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eva Müller

    I really really wanted to like this book but unfortunately it failed in every possible way a Holmes-pastiche can fail, in every way a fictional re-telling of Jack the Ripper's crimes can fail and in most ways a (historical) crime novel can fail. First of all: The story is not told by Watson but by a third person-narrator with insight in the minds of Holmes and Watson. So the we don't only read about Watson being amazed by Holmes deductions, we also see Holmes being desperate, having no idea what I really really wanted to like this book but unfortunately it failed in every possible way a Holmes-pastiche can fail, in every way a fictional re-telling of Jack the Ripper's crimes can fail and in most ways a (historical) crime novel can fail. First of all: The story is not told by Watson but by a third person-narrator with insight in the minds of Holmes and Watson. So the we don't only read about Watson being amazed by Holmes deductions, we also see Holmes being desperate, having no idea what to do next and so on. Holmes being human in that way doesn't work for me. I need the mystery. Besides we are still kept in the dark about many of his deductions. Holmes finds a vital clue quite early on in the book but refuses to tell Watson about it and even when we're accompanying Holmes we don't learn anything about it until Holmes tells Watson over 100 pages later (that happens a couple of times though later with less pages in between). Why bother with that that kind of narration when you still won't let your readers know everything? As an added mystery the author still went for the “We found this old manuscript in a safe”-introduction. I hate them because by now it is quite widely known that Holmes was not real so there is absolutely no need to pretend he was. And if you do it at least keep it short. Hannah goes on for pages about one person getting it from another and about orders not to open it before a certain date. Yawn. Then there are the footnotes. On 430 pages of story and another 10 postscript by the author there are 120 footnotes. Let me say that again: 120 footnotes. I really only accept Terry Pratchett's excessive use of footnotes in fiction but even if he had that amount in a novel I'd complain (also: this edition, at least, doesn't have the footnotes at the bottom of the page but at the end of the book, so you'll have to leaf to the back of the book 120 times). And the footnotes aren't even interesting (but I'm that kind of person that just has to check them anyway) and could mostly be summed up with 'Oh look how clever I am! Look how much research I did!!!'. Some footnotes just refer to the Holmes-canon, e.g. if he used a quote from one of the stories or a person that also appeared in another story appears, the footnote tells which story that was. You can argue about how necessary those are. Personally I think that the Holmes-nerd will know that anyway and the other won't care that much (in fact I think that not even Holmes-nerds will care that much about how many dressing-gowns he had, which colours they were and which he wore most but Hanna still explains it in a footnote). The same goes for the footnotes explaining more about Victorian society or giving more information about the real people that appear in this story. Then there are the second-worst kind of footnotes which explain in-jokes. e.g. at one point Holmes meets George Bernhard Shaw and talks to him about the Cockney accent and London flower-girls. The footnote then informs us about Pygmalion. See above: Nerds will know it and others won't care. However, the absolutely worst are those in which the author points out his own mistakes. Honestly. People refer to places or quotes from books/plays etc. and then we are informed in the footnote that they didn't exist/weren't yet written at that time. I am not making this up. It's always accompanied by phrases like “For some inexplicable reason” or some babbling about how Watson often had issues with the exact chronology in his writings etc. Sorry but on what level of insanity is this author operating? Does he actually believe that this was an old manuscript? I do not understand. Besides all this I didn't think that Hannah managed to capture Holmes terribly well. Partly that's certainly because of the unusual narration-perspective but he also fell in the trap that lots of Holmes-pastiche writers fall into: Holmes is too much of a jerk and Watson too much of an idiot. This is of course a very fine line and others might see it differently but Watson seems barely able to string coherent thoughts together and Holmes insults him constantly so I really began wondering why those two still stuck together at all. I never felt the genuine friendship from the original stories. Holmes mostly mocks Watson and keeps much more from him than usually. Lastly there is the small issue of Jack the Ripper who seems to be missing from large parts of this book. Sometimes he's barely mentioned at all in the chapters and instead we learn all kinds of things about the Victorian age and its famous people. That's another fine line. On the one hand I do want information on the time a historic novel is set in, on the other if I am terribly interested I can read non-fiction. However, here the author wasn't a bit over the line, he was miles away. I ended up skipping whole paragraphs because I simply did not care enough. (Often I also skipped whole paragraphs because the author loved introducing new characters or places with half a page of adjectives...honestly you'd think he got paid per adjective). I'd really love to say anything positive about this book but I simply can't. In fact I have already focused on all the major annoyances and left out the minor things because this review is already long enough. My quest for a good Holmes meets the Ripper-story continues.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    That was a letdown. But, I'm going to start with the things that I enjoyed about the book. 1. Very well researched. So many endnotes, and most of them were full of little facts that didn't pertain to the information, but were just a bit of backstory for things to come together, even though they weren't needed for your understanding of what was going on in the novel. 2. Weaving of fact and fiction. Hanna handled all the characters pretty well in my opinion. Clear understanding of Holmes and Watson a That was a letdown. But, I'm going to start with the things that I enjoyed about the book. 1. Very well researched. So many endnotes, and most of them were full of little facts that didn't pertain to the information, but were just a bit of backstory for things to come together, even though they weren't needed for your understanding of what was going on in the novel. 2. Weaving of fact and fiction. Hanna handled all the characters pretty well in my opinion. Clear understanding of Holmes and Watson and all the other canon characters. Along with that, he was good with the real people that were mentioned in the book. 3. Well paced. I hate a book that isn't paced well. Like things happen too quickly or too slow for the size of the book. This one was well done. There was a good time between the murders, allowing for sufficient time for Holmes to search out the suspect. 4. A good job of trying to fit in other cases around the center case. I thought that was unique, really. Most authors wouldn't dare try to do that since all the cases are scattered and there's no real way for us to know the chronological order of any of them, but I thought it was a nice touch to further immerse the reader in the story. Now, to the things I didn't like so much. 1. Accents. Yaas. Waaaalll. No. Just please stop. Hanna had a grasp of how to do accents, yes, but they weren't done at the right place. I didn't think that Holmes would say "Yaas." Or that Mycroft would say very southern sayings that stood out and drew me away from the novel. Not to mention the difficulty of reading the accent and still gathering the meaning of what was being said. 2. No. Killer. Given. Seriously? The point of this book is to just throw something out there, but Hanna did not give a killer at all. Left it as ambiguous as the real case is. I can admire him for that, but I would have wanted some hairbrained theory to be put to light because it's all for fun. Completely fictional, after all. 3. The confusion of dates and such, I don't like that. In my head everything gets twisted around when they try to stick things in -- such as with the extra cases that I did dote upon earlier. It makes it a touch difficult to keep things straight, especially since their is no certainty about when the cases happened in Doyle's order. 4. Characterization of Doyle's characters. It felt a bit off throughout the novel. Just something was off about it that made me pull away from the book to try to figure out what was off about it. 5. Third person. Sherlock Holmes is one of the few things I think ought to be in first person. Reading it in third threw me off quite a bit for a good while since I was looking forward to reading Watson's random comments on the novel. Overall, this book held my attention, introduced things that I hadn't known before, entertained throughout the novel the whole idea that it was royalty or, at least, not a common folk doing the crimes, and Hanna did a good job with characters that weren't easy to write. There were things that needed to be ironed out, but that doesn't make it a bad book at all.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Hayes

    A very enjoyable book to read, that is thoroughly researched and footnoted by the author, but the ultimate solution kept me from giving this a five star rating. Hanna has written a book that entertwines classic Holmes' adventures with the horrors of the Jack the Ripper murders very well, and I couldn't put it down. Watson and Holmes' voices were true to their characters as were the other "notables" that appear. I just wish the solution for Jack's identity had been better... A very enjoyable book to read, that is thoroughly researched and footnoted by the author, but the ultimate solution kept me from giving this a five star rating. Hanna has written a book that entertwines classic Holmes' adventures with the horrors of the Jack the Ripper murders very well, and I couldn't put it down. Watson and Holmes' voices were true to their characters as were the other "notables" that appear. I just wish the solution for Jack's identity had been better...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert Spencer

    In his dedication to detail concerning the Ripper murders, I'm afraid Hanna allows the pace to dawdle far too much. I thought the choice of a third person narrator a bit odd, especially as the conceit is that it is all based on lost notes by Watson. The ending is unforgivable, I won't say more than that. In his dedication to detail concerning the Ripper murders, I'm afraid Hanna allows the pace to dawdle far too much. I thought the choice of a third person narrator a bit odd, especially as the conceit is that it is all based on lost notes by Watson. The ending is unforgivable, I won't say more than that.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    A monster is stalking the streets of Whitechapel, killing five women and frustrating not only the police service but also the esteemed Sherlock Holmes. It is quite refreshing to see a failure in the 'Further Adventures' series, but the novel feels off because of the third person narration. A monster is stalking the streets of Whitechapel, killing five women and frustrating not only the police service but also the esteemed Sherlock Holmes. It is quite refreshing to see a failure in the 'Further Adventures' series, but the novel feels off because of the third person narration.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    Edward B. Hanna definitely did his research, both about the Holmesian canon and the Whitechapel murders. (The 100+ endnotes are fascinating, and quite possibly my favorite part of the novel.) I particularly enjoyed the sense of historical context and the glimpses into Mycroft Holmes and his relationship to various figures of the time (Prime Minister Lord Salisbury, Lord Randolph Churchill, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, etc.) as well as his own brother. Hanna manages to make the tired Royal Con Edward B. Hanna definitely did his research, both about the Holmesian canon and the Whitechapel murders. (The 100+ endnotes are fascinating, and quite possibly my favorite part of the novel.) I particularly enjoyed the sense of historical context and the glimpses into Mycroft Holmes and his relationship to various figures of the time (Prime Minister Lord Salisbury, Lord Randolph Churchill, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, etc.) as well as his own brother. Hanna manages to make the tired Royal Conspiracy theory of Jack the Ripper fresh and compelling, as well (helped by a somewhat ambiguous ending). There were some truly breathtaking scenes, including an almost-silent showdown (staredown?) between Mycroft and Sherlock at the Diogenes Club and a game of billiards between Watson and the Prince of Wales. That said, it's not a perfect work; because it's written in the third person rather than from John Watson's point of view - a necessity, since the Hound of the Baskervilles case falls in the midst of the Whitechapel murders, and Watson therefore is away from London - the reader loses much of the warmth and humanity of his perspective, and always feels a step removed from the characters. I would recommend this to anyone interested in Sherlock Holmes's take on Jack the Ripper (although my favorite of these pastiches to date remains Dust and Shadow by Lyndsay Faye). It's quite a satisfying read, especially for its sense of setting, both in terms of place and time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    Fusion of truth and fiction is fascinating for several reasons, foremost among them being the efforts on part of the author(s) to resolve the inconsistencies related to dates and events. Edward B Hanna's "The Whitechapel Horrors" is doubly fascinating because it brings together two of Victorian England's iconic figures: the beloved Sherlock Holmes and the hated Jack the Ripper! Although this particular brand of fusion has been attempted at in several previous works, beginning with Ellery Queen's Fusion of truth and fiction is fascinating for several reasons, foremost among them being the efforts on part of the author(s) to resolve the inconsistencies related to dates and events. Edward B Hanna's "The Whitechapel Horrors" is doubly fascinating because it brings together two of Victorian England's iconic figures: the beloved Sherlock Holmes and the hated Jack the Ripper! Although this particular brand of fusion has been attempted at in several previous works, beginning with Ellery Queen's "A Study in Terror" and reaching an astounding pinnacle (or nadir, since opinions do differ in such cases) in Michael Dibdin's "The Last Sherlock Holmes Story", this work amazed me due to several reasons: 1. The amount of research put into it would astonish several Ripperologists, while earning admiration from the followers of "The Game"(assuming that both Sherlock Holmes and John H. Watson were real persons) propounded by late William S. Baring-Gould. 2. Inconsistencies in the chronolgy deduced from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's works have been neatly fit into the calendar of Ripper-murders. 3. The story is eminently readable, despite the author's steadfast attachment to the Royal conspiracy theory. My only grievance is that Mr. Hanna could have given the work some sort of finality, rather than trying to be too tactical and keeping Watson as well as us in animated suspension (Holmes KNEW!). It is for this last minute shifting of thrust towards the truth of Ripper remaining elusive that I am taking one star away from my ratings. Otherwise, it is a very-very good novel. Recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael Thompson

    Well written (although not in the traditional Watsonian narrative), well researched and compelling reading, but a little disappointing in the ending, although understandable and oddly appropriate. The author even explanins the disappointing ending as necessary and realistic. While I'm not an expert on Holmes or the Ripper, I go greatly respect the author's apparent knowledge of both. Well written (although not in the traditional Watsonian narrative), well researched and compelling reading, but a little disappointing in the ending, although understandable and oddly appropriate. The author even explanins the disappointing ending as necessary and realistic. While I'm not an expert on Holmes or the Ripper, I go greatly respect the author's apparent knowledge of both.

  13. 5 out of 5

    S

    not *my* watson. read it for the jtr lore if you want, but this is not the watson from canon, and i read sh adventures because i love watson. don't make him a naive bigot! not *my* watson. read it for the jtr lore if you want, but this is not the watson from canon, and i read sh adventures because i love watson. don't make him a naive bigot!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    The author has obviously done extensive research into Arthur Conan Doyle's writings about Sherlock Holmes. I thought the book was very interesting. The author has obviously done extensive research into Arthur Conan Doyle's writings about Sherlock Holmes. I thought the book was very interesting.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    While I very much enjoyed another Sherlock story in this series, I didn't give enough thought to the fact that this series is essentially re-packaging a scattering of Sherlock stories by various authors, so there is no consistency of style or story, and just because you liked one doesn't mean you'll like the others. I slogged it to 50% of the book before finally calling it quits for a few reasons. First, it's clear the author loves the Sherlock canon; the whole book is steeped in nods to both Co While I very much enjoyed another Sherlock story in this series, I didn't give enough thought to the fact that this series is essentially re-packaging a scattering of Sherlock stories by various authors, so there is no consistency of style or story, and just because you liked one doesn't mean you'll like the others. I slogged it to 50% of the book before finally calling it quits for a few reasons. First, it's clear the author loves the Sherlock canon; the whole book is steeped in nods to both Conan Doyle's work and other contemporary authors of the day. This is a plus. However, this begins to feel like reference for reference's sake, as a large portion of the "winks" add little to the story. It began to feel like the author's goal was to prove how much he knows about Sherlock literature rather than engage me with a story. Also, I found myself skimming past pages of background information that really should have been left out. A reader need not be reminded how terrible the living conditions are in Whitechapel and Spitalfields so repeatedly. The author clearly conducted years of research, but unfortunately, the volumes of research inserted got in the way of the story so much that I lost all interest and momentum. The dialogue felt like I was listening to a one-trick impression of an English accent. Each character said something, then repeated it, and tagged it with a dialect tag. [say something] [repeat shortened version, indeed]: "It was horrible. Horrible, indeed. Wasn't it?" "He's a fine lad. Very fine, indeed, eh?" Ever watch the US version of The Office? Think of Andy doing his British accent. That's what this felt like. And this is just the pattern without the author trying to introduce Cockney accent, which grinds the dialogue to a snail's pace. "Oy, guvnah, 'e lykes a 'ole to do, but me button 'ole frount, innit?" (*These are not actual quotes, but they may as well be.) Finally, about the place where I left off, the introduction of Oscar Wilde came off reeking of homophobia and played to comedic effect that fell flat. That's when I said, "Eenuffs eenuf, innit?" There are too many other good books out there to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brown

    Another Sherlock Holmes vs Jack the Ripper. Not a bad book but in my opinion not a very good one either. The author made Watson very unlikeable with his xenophobic, homophobic, fanatical English attitudes and his overall inability to accept events without preaching them over and over. He was also presented as a bit dumber than usual for non-Conan Doyle writers. Holmes was presented as uninterested in many scientific concepts of criminal investigations which he was in favor of under Conan Doyle's w Another Sherlock Holmes vs Jack the Ripper. Not a bad book but in my opinion not a very good one either. The author made Watson very unlikeable with his xenophobic, homophobic, fanatical English attitudes and his overall inability to accept events without preaching them over and over. He was also presented as a bit dumber than usual for non-Conan Doyle writers. Holmes was presented as uninterested in many scientific concepts of criminal investigations which he was in favor of under Conan Doyle's writings. We also have long passages and even whole chapters of how Holmes felt about his actions while on stake-out or in pursuit of suspects that are very contrary to how he is presented by Doyle. The book is about 125 pages too long as so much is already covered about the Ripper crimes and London city and society of this time that rehashing them page after page gets boring. Too much filler is created with new characters and their interactions with Holmes and trying to present some as possible Rippers. There are hundreds of footnotes which often appear to be the authors attempts to justify his meddling with characters, events and situations rather than being needed to clear up a point presented. Many would have added more filler but even presenting them at the end adds more pages of material than required. The author is a broadcast journalist who either chose not to be brief and concise as most radio/television presentations are due to time constraints to present his version of this overly often covered story or he is reacting against those constrictions and just decided to write on and on to get his full efforts out. Either way his format did not add to the readability and enjoyment of this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    It’s always a pleasure to read Sherlock, canon or pastiche. This novel was quite atmospheric & evocative, with multiple scenes both at 221B & in London’s damp, dreary, & foul East End. There is copious historical relevance & instruction, with over 100 footnotes detailing the actual Ripper murders & political contexts & players in 1888 Victorian England. Therefore this is a worthy read for true crime & English history aficionados. However, the mystery itself is overlong with a humdrum ending whic It’s always a pleasure to read Sherlock, canon or pastiche. This novel was quite atmospheric & evocative, with multiple scenes both at 221B & in London’s damp, dreary, & foul East End. There is copious historical relevance & instruction, with over 100 footnotes detailing the actual Ripper murders & political contexts & players in 1888 Victorian England. Therefore this is a worthy read for true crime & English history aficionados. However, the mystery itself is overlong with a humdrum ending which will interest absolutely no one. Too much time spent on much-trodden psychological exposition of the great detective, & enough loose ends to trip over. There are several engrossing appearances of actual princes, diplomats, etc., & some worthwhile education on sociological matters regarding London’s poor. For additional instruction on Jack the Ripper & for video tours of Whitechapel & Spitalfields which are wonderfully helpful to geography buffs, I found a comprehensive single website I kept open for the duration of the novel: jack-the-ripper.org

  18. 5 out of 5

    Herm Stippich

    As a sometime devotee of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries, I’d often wondered why the Ripper murders were never a subject of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle‘s writings. Now having read this book written in 1992, I understand how this affair shocked and scandalized Victorian England of 1888. Even 30-40 years after, when Doyle I was riding his stories, it was still within the memory of those readers. It was clearly out of bounds due to the sensibilities of that time, not to mention the rumors that the royal f As a sometime devotee of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries, I’d often wondered why the Ripper murders were never a subject of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle‘s writings. Now having read this book written in 1992, I understand how this affair shocked and scandalized Victorian England of 1888. Even 30-40 years after, when Doyle I was riding his stories, it was still within the memory of those readers. It was clearly out of bounds due to the sensibilities of that time, not to mention the rumors that the royal family was somehow involved. This book itself is a great tribute to Conan Doyle and Holmes and faithfully re-creates the period, its grimy atmosphere and pithy dialogue you would expect between Holmes and Watson and those they encounter. Thoroughly enjoyable and I will not divulge who is the murderer was ...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    Read some reviews on Kindle about this .... I was about half way through. One reminded me why I don't lke reviews! This book is well written and in the style of Doyle.When you read a book to be fair read it from cover to cover. If the author puts a note at the front of the book, they are hoping you will take the time to read what it says, If you like STORIES about Jack the Ripper, Sherlock Holmes and life in London in 1888, this is the book for you. If you want to split hairs about dates and oth Read some reviews on Kindle about this .... I was about half way through. One reminded me why I don't lke reviews! This book is well written and in the style of Doyle.When you read a book to be fair read it from cover to cover. If the author puts a note at the front of the book, they are hoping you will take the time to read what it says, If you like STORIES about Jack the Ripper, Sherlock Holmes and life in London in 1888, this is the book for you. If you want to split hairs about dates and other details feel free to read a history book. This book is there to entertain and it does big time. Hanna did not get a message from above affter over 100 years and hundreds of books being written that solves who was Jack! If you really need that answer this book is NOT for you. I enjoyed every page of this and will go back and re read it again with pleasure!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Davis

    I will say that I did a bit of research before I dove into this book. I love all things Sherlock so it wasn't hard to buy in, but I wanted to read a good Jack the Ripper story and it was just good sport that these two things crossed paths in this book. This book is fantastic from both Holmes and Ripper perspectives because of the way they intertwine. The story that I know of Saucy Jack lined up well with the life and times of Holmes during the same period. Watson stitches together a web of stori I will say that I did a bit of research before I dove into this book. I love all things Sherlock so it wasn't hard to buy in, but I wanted to read a good Jack the Ripper story and it was just good sport that these two things crossed paths in this book. This book is fantastic from both Holmes and Ripper perspectives because of the way they intertwine. The story that I know of Saucy Jack lined up well with the life and times of Holmes during the same period. Watson stitches together a web of stories that is "accurate" for both sides of the story while giving each it's own special place in the story. I was intrigued with the connections between these two iconic characters and I would recommend this story to anyone that enjoys a good 1800's British murder story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Received as a gift, I was hesitant to read what I had imagined was going to be a dark story that was a wild re-write to a highly publicized series of events. I was wrong. Without giving any spoilers, one of the most interesting aspects of this book, is that it's not written as a Dr Watson narrative. It's presented by an anonymous third party "writer" that provides a unique perspective that tells of actions and reactions from both Sherlock and Watson as seen from afar. There was no attempt to re-wri Received as a gift, I was hesitant to read what I had imagined was going to be a dark story that was a wild re-write to a highly publicized series of events. I was wrong. Without giving any spoilers, one of the most interesting aspects of this book, is that it's not written as a Dr Watson narrative. It's presented by an anonymous third party "writer" that provides a unique perspective that tells of actions and reactions from both Sherlock and Watson as seen from afar. There was no attempt to re-write the events, and I felt it was handled well. Highly recommended, especially to those that may have the same reservations that I had.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Ring

    Read for an essay on Sherlock Holmes v Jack the Ripper. Classic mystery novel as well as being exhausively researched by the author. 25 pages of footnotes of characters, earlier texts of Sherlock Holmes, historical facts and individuals, to help show whether reality meets fictions.

  23. 5 out of 5

    william scott

    Rambling on and on! Way too much rambling leaving Holmes and Watson on a shelf someplace. Lost interest many times while reading and could not wait to get to the end of the book, which by the way was never solved leaving Watson and myself hanging!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

    Generally I think Whitechapel has be done too many times, but I really Homes and I couldn't resist it. As it turns out, it was a good book. Generally I think Whitechapel has be done too many times, but I really Homes and I couldn't resist it. As it turns out, it was a good book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard Davis

    I was really enjoying this - right up til the last couple chapters. I can't see what the point of the story was...... I was really enjoying this - right up til the last couple chapters. I can't see what the point of the story was......

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barton Kimbro

    Just don’t

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Great read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    Good book but extremely unsatisfying ending which reduces it by a star.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vadim Barva

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Edward B. Hanna's novel is an interesting as well as electrifying read. The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Whitechapel Horrors provokes an atmosphere of historic mystery in which Hanna does a great job in incorporating standard and typical facts of Watson and Holmes while giving the book a sense of "what comes next?" Hanna's 440 page novel begins with an unopened basquaise, and a leather portfolio containing a letter. This introduction created mixed feelings in my mind as I kept aski Edward B. Hanna's novel is an interesting as well as electrifying read. The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Whitechapel Horrors provokes an atmosphere of historic mystery in which Hanna does a great job in incorporating standard and typical facts of Watson and Holmes while giving the book a sense of "what comes next?" Hanna's 440 page novel begins with an unopened basquaise, and a leather portfolio containing a letter. This introduction created mixed feelings in my mind as I kept asking myself what's the significance of these items? Or who is Jack the Ripper which was labeled as one of the names on the letter. Being a newbie with Sherlock Holmes, I found myself asking many questions as Hanna writes in a style in which it's assumed the reader already has background knowledge on Holmes; sadly I only have a little. As the novel unfolds the diction becomes more developed and challenging, as Holmes being the intelligent man he is tends to outdo himself in the vocabulary department. As the relationship of Holmes and Watson unravels the novel itself unravels. This relationship is one of a friendly and professional stature as Holmes believes, while being the noble and intelligent man he is, he himself has messed up or failed more times than Watson. This of course is an important idea as we dive into the 440 pages of this novel. The killer of Whitechapel, this murderous psychopath, is lose and its up to Holmes to figure out this puzzle. Will Holmes find out who the murderer is and put him behind bars? Will the reader even find out who the killers is, or will it be left a mystery? While you may guess the answers to these questions without reading the book, based off of my weak-sarcastic writing, it's important not to overlook the reason behind these and get in the mindset of enjoying a great historic mystery. [Spoiler Alert] My reaction to this is book is quite subtle, as one might guess, Holmes never does establish hard evidence as to who is the killer on Whitechapel. While many dislike this idea, I believe it to be quite electrifying as it create even more mystery, on top of the mystery created through the reading. I also enjoyed the third-person narration, as opposed to the typical first-person narration by Watson, as it develops the story on a whole different level. The description of each little negligible thing or idea made the read redundant or overwhelming at times, while at other times the reader was left with a questionable mind. Simple ideas like, who is John Watson? Even greater newbies than me may have a hard time pinpointing who or what someone or something is. While being vague and extremely detailed at different points, I still enjoyed the imagery Hanna gave the novel. Descriptions for the streets of London, the banquets, the housing, even the weather, helped paint a vivid image in my mind. Let's just say if I ever were to visit 1900's London I would know my way around. All in all, the novel may have seemed boring at times as descriptions at times, but now that I think about it, Hanna did a wonderful job of creating this mental image of 1900's London with historic and memorable people and locations. I would recommend this novel to teens and any older as the third person narration may be tough to follow at first, as well as the diction. I believe teenagers and even adults will find excitement and joy in this mysterious adventure filled with advanced knowledge and vocabulary as it may challenge them to read with a more critical mind which is always fulfilling. Each page I would have to use the dictionary in order to decode a simple message of "I'm elated" to "I'm happy." This novel was an interesting read and could be read in one sitting as it may keep one on their heels for the majority of the time, if the diction is understood and the plot is fully analyzed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Radley

    I love the story and love the fact that this is Holmes vs The Ripper but and here is the biggie its very long winded and feels more like a factual and indepth look at the whole atmosphere and political undercurrents of the time with a side story of Sherlock holmes and Watson thrown in. I am afraid that though the story is great and I do enjoy the book it just feels sluggish, slow and laborious and at times dull. But its still good fun and though the ending is a complete sell out its still got th I love the story and love the fact that this is Holmes vs The Ripper but and here is the biggie its very long winded and feels more like a factual and indepth look at the whole atmosphere and political undercurrents of the time with a side story of Sherlock holmes and Watson thrown in. I am afraid that though the story is great and I do enjoy the book it just feels sluggish, slow and laborious and at times dull. But its still good fun and though the ending is a complete sell out its still got that conan doylesque taste.

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