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Motel of the Mysteries

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It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.


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It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom It is the year 4022; all of the ancient country of Usa has been buried under many feet of detritus from a catastrophe that occurred back in 1985. Imagine, then, the excitement that Howard Carson, an amateur archeologist at best, experienced when in crossing the perimeter of an abandoned excavation site he felt the ground give way beneath him and found himself at the bottom of a shaft, which, judging from the DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from an archaic doorknob, was clearly the entrance to a still-sealed burial chamber. Carson's incredible discoveries, including the remains of two bodies, one of then on a ceremonial bed facing an altar that appeared to be a means of communicating with the Gods and the other lying in a porcelain sarcophagus in the Inner Chamber, permitted him to piece together the whole fabric of that extraordinary civilization.

30 review for Motel of the Mysteries

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aerin

    I loved this book as a kid, and probably checked it out from the school library at least a dozen times. I recently picked up a copy of it in a fit of nostalgia, and am enjoying it all over again. It's so good. So silly and so good, and the illustrations are lovely. Published in 1979 and poking fun at the King Tut craze of the time (there was a very splashy museum tour of the mummy and tomb artifacts in the mid-late 70's), it takes place in North America in the year 4022, millennia after the great I loved this book as a kid, and probably checked it out from the school library at least a dozen times. I recently picked up a copy of it in a fit of nostalgia, and am enjoying it all over again. It's so good. So silly and so good, and the illustrations are lovely. Published in 1979 and poking fun at the King Tut craze of the time (there was a very splashy museum tour of the mummy and tomb artifacts in the mid-late 70's), it takes place in North America in the year 4022, millennia after the great civilization "Usa" was destroyed by and buried under a blizzard of junk mail (an unfortunate and unforeseen consequence of a reduction in postal fees). The book meticulously documents the discovery and interpretation of the great archaeological find, the Motel of the Mysteries, which is described as a grand tomb complex that finally revealed to the world "the mysterious burial customs of the late twentieth-century North American." It's both an extended parody of Howard Carter's discovery of Tut's tomb (here, one Howard Carson, an amateur of "unprecedented mediocrity" stumbles upon the entrance to a crappy motel room, reporting back to his colleagues that the chamber contains "WONDERFUL THINGS!") and a satirical commentary on modern American life (where the television is interpreted as the "Great Altar" towards which everything in the room must face, and the strip of gas stations and fast food joints along the highway is designated "Monument Row," with each sign representing "a different religious sect or point of view... placed as near as possible to heaven"). As a kid, much of this was lost on me - I had no idea until I picked this up as an adult, for instance, that this had any connection to real archaeology or Tutankhamun (even though the name of the motel is the Toot'n'C'mon!). Instead, what I took from this book was the utter silliness and midguidedness of Carson et al.'s reconstruction of American life. The picture of the woman wearing a toilet seat around her neck, lid fastened to her head with a paper "sanitized for your protection" band and toothbrushes dangling from her ears, was the absolute height of hilarity for me. More than that, though, the appeal of this book was the strange futuristic world it posited, where everything we know is impossibly lost and gone. This was one of my first exposures to post-apocalyptic fiction - there just aren't that many kids' picture books about the end of the world - and that idea and that imagery absolutely entranced me. I can draw a direct line from my fascination with this book to my later fascination with books like A Canticle for Leibowitz and Riddley Walker and The Book of the New Sun - books where societies in a hazily distant future world look back on our artifacts and wonder. As silly as it might seem, this book was foundational for me. And I still absolutely adore it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I've read quite a few of David Macauley's books, mostly the ones like Castle: meticulously illustrated and highly researched nonfiction. Motel of the Mysteries is another thing entirely. Set nearly two millenia after the destruction of the U.S., (apparently by being buried under a junk mail explosion) it describes the excavation of a motel, as interpretted by archeologist Howard Carson. See what he did there? If so, you are the target audience. It can be a pretty funny book, driven by Carson's w I've read quite a few of David Macauley's books, mostly the ones like Castle: meticulously illustrated and highly researched nonfiction. Motel of the Mysteries is another thing entirely. Set nearly two millenia after the destruction of the U.S., (apparently by being buried under a junk mail explosion) it describes the excavation of a motel, as interpretted by archeologist Howard Carson. See what he did there? If so, you are the target audience. It can be a pretty funny book, driven by Carson's wildly inaccurate (yet oddly understandable) conclusions about the site. Obviously, it's a burial chamber (motel room), with altar (TV) and sarcophagus (bathtub). The joke can run a bit thin towards the end, though the reproductions (available for sale at the museum gift shop!) ended the book on a high note. Silly though it is, it does raise a few good questions. How much do we really know about prehistory? What has archeology really taught us about the past? And, most importantly, how would the distant future view us?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The first anthropology text I was required to read as an undergraduate was a delightful and instructive satire by Horace Miner, "Body Ritual among the Nacirema," which originally appeared in The American Anthropologist, vol. 58 (1956), pp. 503-507, and which has been reproduced many times since. The point was to warn aspiring anthropologists against the dangers of interpreting other cultures based on inadequate information or lack cultural understanding. It was both instructive and humorous. Whe The first anthropology text I was required to read as an undergraduate was a delightful and instructive satire by Horace Miner, "Body Ritual among the Nacirema," which originally appeared in The American Anthropologist, vol. 58 (1956), pp. 503-507, and which has been reproduced many times since. The point was to warn aspiring anthropologists against the dangers of interpreting other cultures based on inadequate information or lack cultural understanding. It was both instructive and humorous. When I was in my first year of graduate school, my adviser shared with me a cartoon with two panels. On the left was depicted a nondescript shard of pottery labeled "Archaeological Find." On the right was a drawing of a triumphal procession of chariots down a street lined with elaborate columns surmounted with intricate friezes in bas-relief while trumpets blared and crowds in elaborate costumes cheered. It was labeled "Archaeologist's Reconstruction." Motel of the Mysteries is an illustrated and humorous look at the excavation and (mis)interpretation of a twentieth-century North American motel, "TOOT 'N' C'MON," and its associated artifacts by a forty-first century archaeologist, bow-tie-wearing Howard Carson. And if you don't get the angle Macaulay is going for, just consider that the discovery happens in 4022, 2100 years after another famous discovery by an archaeologist working in Egypt with the financial backing of Lord Carnarvon. Carson's faithful assistant, Harriet, wears some of the recovered artifacts in a sly reference to Sophia Schliemann, who was fond of wearing ancient jewelry discovered at Hisarlik. The book also skewers museums and their gift shops and reenactments of ancient cultures. It is cleverly executed, even if it is a bit of a one-trick pony.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nate D

    Like many, I was long familiar with Macaulay's more direct and informative works -- I had a copy of Castle as a child -- but the one that stuck with me was this one, after a brief brush with it in a bookstore: a meticulously-drawn account of amateur anthropologist in the 4020s bungling the interpretation of our current (long lost) civilization. A strange satiric treatment of the distance of interpretation and our assurances in what we know of other cutures, perhaps, as a mysterious picture book Like many, I was long familiar with Macaulay's more direct and informative works -- I had a copy of Castle as a child -- but the one that stuck with me was this one, after a brief brush with it in a bookstore: a meticulously-drawn account of amateur anthropologist in the 4020s bungling the interpretation of our current (long lost) civilization. A strange satiric treatment of the distance of interpretation and our assurances in what we know of other cutures, perhaps, as a mysterious picture book for unknown ages somewhere between children and adults, or for anyone, maybe.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Don

    This book has one comedic idea - that future archaeologists, unaware of how our technology is used, will misinterpret their function and assume most items had a religious purpose. It's an absurdist anti-intellectual work that tries to be funny but failed for me. Mildly amusing in the first few pages but once you perceive the one idea it has it becomes predictable and tedious for the remainder.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    If you give children books as gifts (as I do) I suggest that at some point you give them this. It probably wasn't intended for children when written and illustrated, but you would be hard-pressed to associate any particular age of child as its ideal audience. I found this in second grade on my homeroom teacher's bookshelf. My reading of it aroused that special kind of terror children will get when encountering something especially unique and weird and slightly out of grasp of their full understa If you give children books as gifts (as I do) I suggest that at some point you give them this. It probably wasn't intended for children when written and illustrated, but you would be hard-pressed to associate any particular age of child as its ideal audience. I found this in second grade on my homeroom teacher's bookshelf. My reading of it aroused that special kind of terror children will get when encountering something especially unique and weird and slightly out of grasp of their full understanding. Basically it's an anthropologist trying to make sense of the remains of something like a Super 8 motel many years after our current civilization perished. It's very funny. What stood out for me as a child were skeletons on beds watching television, held in place as if in a mummy's tomb and the interpretations of common bathroom paraphernalia as idols and ritual objects. It could get a child thinking about the mortality of cultures and civilizations, elastic interpretations of the materials of past cultures, the hilarity of familiar objects without proper context, and so on.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    One of the pride and joys of my collection of illustrated books. I had it signed by David Macaulay at the National Book Festival a couple of years ago. Briefly, this book is a spoof on archeology, with specific reference to Howard Carter's discover of the tomb of King Tut. In the distant future (41st century), a cheap hotel room is discovered, still intact, and the archaeologists, full of wonder, examine the "treasures" - such as the "sanitized for your protection" paper slip on the toilet slip. One of the pride and joys of my collection of illustrated books. I had it signed by David Macaulay at the National Book Festival a couple of years ago. Briefly, this book is a spoof on archeology, with specific reference to Howard Carter's discover of the tomb of King Tut. In the distant future (41st century), a cheap hotel room is discovered, still intact, and the archaeologists, full of wonder, examine the "treasures" - such as the "sanitized for your protection" paper slip on the toilet slip. (The toilet seat itself, they posit, was worn as a ceremonial collar.) Too droll for words. Read it and weep (with laughter). I don't know how Macaulay kept a steady hand as he did the fabulous drawings for this one -- he must have phenomenal self control.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jane Lebak

    A short, cynical take on American culture through the lens of failed archaeology. I remembered reading this in grammar school, but in retrospect I have no idea who it's written for. It's not a kid's book. it's not really an adult's book. It's perfect for me, a cynical and childish adult. :-)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Olivia "So many books--so little time.""

    The premise of this book was really funny.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sabine

    If you've ever taken an archaeology class on Neolithic cultures (or Mesolithic, Paleolithic etc; you get the idea: no written history), you can kind of see where this book is going (a lot of the prehistory seems to be about "ritual activities"). The central point it seems to make is about interpretation and its reliability. Which sure is something archaeologists are generally aware of (or should be). The problem is just that you can't test your interpretations in experiments like in the hard sci If you've ever taken an archaeology class on Neolithic cultures (or Mesolithic, Paleolithic etc; you get the idea: no written history), you can kind of see where this book is going (a lot of the prehistory seems to be about "ritual activities"). The central point it seems to make is about interpretation and its reliability. Which sure is something archaeologists are generally aware of (or should be). The problem is just that you can't test your interpretations in experiments like in the hard sciences by generating new data. There is only comparison amongst the data you have been supplied with by the past and the selective excavations in the present. Add the fact that human societies are not as predictable as biological systems for example. Basically, interpretation is fucking hard. (Or easy, depending on your perspective.) And it can go wrong badly which, in reality, is less visible in contemporary scholarship as it is in this book. Unless someone could invent a time machine...please? I should say though that interpretive mistakes can and do correct themselves once new (or old, depending on you perspective) data arises (surveys, excavations, analyses..). Which doesn't mean that we will ever get even close to "The truth". P.S. There was one more specifically archaeological concept, besides archaeological interpretation, in this book that made me happy. The one alluding to crop and soil marks and the guy thinking it was aliens really hit home! (It was hilarious!) But unfortunately no trowel was depicted during the excavations which was too bad.. P.P.S. Despite the interpretation issues, some of those (most... pretty much all...) by the principal archaeologist in this book were pretty dumb. So, what do we know about ancient civilizations? Well they were definitely here at one point.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Converse

    I think David Macaulay is better known for his non-fiction illustrated books, often aimed at children, that explain how things were made, but I loved this illustrated spoof of archaeology. In 4022, archaeologists excavate a cheap motel buried in the 1985 disaster that covers North America with a solidified crust composed of junk mail, and solidified air pollution – and proceed to systematically misinterpret the site as an ancient mortuary, based upon the one room that contained a couple of skel I think David Macaulay is better known for his non-fiction illustrated books, often aimed at children, that explain how things were made, but I loved this illustrated spoof of archaeology. In 4022, archaeologists excavate a cheap motel buried in the 1985 disaster that covers North America with a solidified crust composed of junk mail, and solidified air pollution – and proceed to systematically misinterpret the site as an ancient mortuary, based upon the one room that contained a couple of skeletons. The “do not disturb sign” becomes “the gleaming Sacred Seal …. Placed on the door by the officials after the burial to protect the tomb and its inhabitant for eternity” and the bathtub becomes a highly polished white sarcophagus.” I liked the puns that referenced actual archaeologistd, such as naming the main character Howard Carson (the discoverer of Tutankhamen was Howard Carter; like Carter, Carson sees "wonderful things" when he opens the "tomb"), and the illustration of his assistant, Harriet Burton, wearing the “Sacred Collar, matching Headband ……the magnificent plasticus ear ornaments and the exquisite silver chain and pedant (respectively toilet set and lid, “sanitized for your protection” paper strip around same, two toothbrushes worn by Harriet as earrings and the stopper for the bath tub) which eerily resembles the photograph of Sophia Schleimann wearing” the jewels of Helen” excavated by Heinrich Schleimann in 1873 from Hisarlik, the probable site of ancient Troy. All of this leads to insight into the “Yank” culture of the country of “Usa.”

  12. 5 out of 5

    dianneOnRBG RIPmalaiseBreak

    A very amusing imaginative, not particularly unlikely bit of the future. A cataclysmic event wipes us out, here, in North America - basically we bury ourselves in pollution. Humans unearth (unpollute?) some tawdry parts of life that were frozen in 1985, and then found in 4022. Needless to say Macaulay's imagination, knowledge of science and architecture, and talent with a pen (manifest in delightful doublespeak, wit reminiscent of Jerome K. Jerome and illustration!) make our mislabeled archaeolog A very amusing imaginative, not particularly unlikely bit of the future. A cataclysmic event wipes us out, here, in North America - basically we bury ourselves in pollution. Humans unearth (unpollute?) some tawdry parts of life that were frozen in 1985, and then found in 4022. Needless to say Macaulay's imagination, knowledge of science and architecture, and talent with a pen (manifest in delightful doublespeak, wit reminiscent of Jerome K. Jerome and illustration!) make our mislabeled archaeologist's mislabeling of everything found in the "Toot 'n' C'mon" (get it??) Motel, hilarious. Our dear digger is named Howard Carson, and like his - unknown to him - predecessor - our fictional discoverer also dies tragically soon after his amazing find. The mismeasure of man; well, and Harriet, his assistant. Highly recommended.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rob Slaven

    My fiancee bought this book for me as a Christmas Gift but upon receiving it found it so absurd that she gave it to me early. At first glance, I too was rather perplexed but upon more detailed perusal this book is subtly amusing. Set centuries in the future, the author takes us through an archaeological dig exploring a common motel room. Our protagonist works diligently to identify all manner of artifacts from toilet seats to televisions and proceeds to get them all completely and utterly wrong. My fiancee bought this book for me as a Christmas Gift but upon receiving it found it so absurd that she gave it to me early. At first glance, I too was rather perplexed but upon more detailed perusal this book is subtly amusing. Set centuries in the future, the author takes us through an archaeological dig exploring a common motel room. Our protagonist works diligently to identify all manner of artifacts from toilet seats to televisions and proceeds to get them all completely and utterly wrong. The outcome is a definite skewering not only of the archaeological sciences but also of society in general. So while on its surface the book is absurd, if you look deeper it really has a keen message. You just have to keep plugging away and give the story a chance to grab your attention.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I kept seeing this book mentioned everywhere for some reason, so I finally ILLed it. It’s a short, quick read, and concerns an amateur archaeologist from far in the future, who makes a major archaeological discovery in the ruins of the former nation called Usa and populated by “Yanks.” Although it does seem to go a bit overboard, it’s still pretty cute and it definitely highlights a lot of concerns that archaeologists and other researchers have to consider when looking at artifacts from other cul I kept seeing this book mentioned everywhere for some reason, so I finally ILLed it. It’s a short, quick read, and concerns an amateur archaeologist from far in the future, who makes a major archaeological discovery in the ruins of the former nation called Usa and populated by “Yanks.” Although it does seem to go a bit overboard, it’s still pretty cute and it definitely highlights a lot of concerns that archaeologists and other researchers have to consider when looking at artifacts from other cultures.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Janis

    Macaulay, well-known for his beautifully illustrated books on buildings for children (Castle, etc.), delivered this hilarious look at archaeology several decades ago. In the future, an archaeologist discovers a preserved hotel room from 1985--complete with skeletons of the last occupants. Using his knowledge, he proceeds to explain what he sees--and it is hilarious! What a great look at our modern culture--although a bit dated for today, it's accurate for 1985, the time in which the book was writt Macaulay, well-known for his beautifully illustrated books on buildings for children (Castle, etc.), delivered this hilarious look at archaeology several decades ago. In the future, an archaeologist discovers a preserved hotel room from 1985--complete with skeletons of the last occupants. Using his knowledge, he proceeds to explain what he sees--and it is hilarious! What a great look at our modern culture--although a bit dated for today, it's accurate for 1985, the time in which the book was written and the year of the book's cataclysmic event. This book is a must-read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt Mikesell

    This is a fun quick read. Interesting concept of how future archaeologists will interpret our modern life. It makes me wonder if theories about lost civilizations we've discovered are on the mark, or if we're totally misinterpreting them?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    Pretty much a one-note joke, but fun.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry

    Nice short novel on how future archeologists might treat our era. Pictures are beautiful, and jokes are palatable.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joy Pixley

    I'd enjoyed this book as a child and was recently reminded about it. What great timing for me, as I happened to pick it up and read it just after seeing the Tutankhamun's Treasures exhibit in LA. I had forgotten that it's a direct spoof on the Tut's tomb discovery and the mania that went along with it. I don't think I'd even noticed the first time around that they set up certain names and photos to mimic the Tut photos. The drawings are high quality, and the commentary is a wonderful dry parody. I'd enjoyed this book as a child and was recently reminded about it. What great timing for me, as I happened to pick it up and read it just after seeing the Tutankhamun's Treasures exhibit in LA. I had forgotten that it's a direct spoof on the Tut's tomb discovery and the mania that went along with it. I don't think I'd even noticed the first time around that they set up certain names and photos to mimic the Tut photos. The drawings are high quality, and the commentary is a wonderful dry parody. The message hits you over the head repeatedly – that there are risks in interpreting cultural symbols of long-distant cultures – but it works. It's funny, it's a clever idea, and it offers plenty of in-jokes for you to laugh at long afterward (sacred point, anyone?). This is more of a picture book than anything else, and it's a quick read; don't expect in-depth coverage. But that, too, is a virtue: it says what it came to say and then stops before it gets dull. I'm caught between a 3 star and 4 star rating, because although I really liked the book for what it was, it feels too lightweight and short to properly match up to other books I rate as 4 stars. I would definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys intellectual humor, especially if you're a fan of archeology and the Howard Carter Tut discovery story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A classic. Post-year-4000, a buried motel is discovered. The future citizens' wild misinterpretations of the sacred objects found (TV, toilet, drain plug) is a hilarious consideration of how much WE have likely gotten wrong about past civilizations.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Neven

    A simple little joke-premise: a future archaeologist unearths a 1980s motel room and interprets it as a sacred ancient tomb. The book is rather underdeveloped, falling short of doing something really punchy with the idea, but it’s cute.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Temerev

    While it is funny and short and a great parody of Howard Carter's discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb, it is not well-enough written to be a book. A blog post format would have suited it well. Still a funny reading, though. Bonus points if you have already seen Carter's account.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Betts-Green (Dinosaur in the Library)

    This was incredibly cool. It’s interesting and fun, but actually quite deep once you think about it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Merel

    Quick must-read for every archaeologist / historian, haha!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emilyn

    I read a number of book related websites to stay up-to-date on what's being published and what is available at MPL. I recently read about Motel of the Mysteries by David Macaulay on one of those websites as an old favorite of a fellow librarian and decided to pick it up. The year is 4022. The ancient civilization of Usa was buried under mounds of detritus in the year 1985. Amateur archeologist Howard Carson makes the discovery of a lifetime when he inadvertently falls into a tomb buried under the I read a number of book related websites to stay up-to-date on what's being published and what is available at MPL. I recently read about Motel of the Mysteries by David Macaulay on one of those websites as an old favorite of a fellow librarian and decided to pick it up. The year is 4022. The ancient civilization of Usa was buried under mounds of detritus in the year 1985. Amateur archeologist Howard Carson makes the discovery of a lifetime when he inadvertently falls into a tomb buried under the detritus. The tomb is undisturbed, still bearing its sacred DO NOT DISTURB sign hanging from the doorknob. What follows is an exhaustive catalog of the contents of the tomb and Carson and his team's explanations of the use and ceremonial significance of each item in the burial chamber. From the description of the altar atop which stands a device for communicating with the gods, to the Inner Chamber containing a porcelain sarcophagus, Carson's findings are entertaining and cast a delightful satirical light on many aspects of American culture. Motel of the Mysteries is not only an interesting speculation about how future generations will interpret the potential remains of current culture, but is a sometimes amusing look back at the technology and furnishings of the 1980s. For example, of the television, Macaulay writes "Judging by the impact marks on the top and sides of the upper altar, some aspect of this communication was dependent upon pounding the surface."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ram

    This really could have been better. Great idea - far-future eccentric stumbles upon a 20th century no-tell motel and mistakes it for an essential, religious structure of a bygone civilization. Thus, the TV becomes the "sacred altar," because everything in a motel room faces the TV; the toilet seat is a sacred collar one must wear before shouting, down the hole, to the gods below; etc. But Macaulay wears out the thin premise quickly and doesn't know how to keep good satire away from mere stupid j This really could have been better. Great idea - far-future eccentric stumbles upon a 20th century no-tell motel and mistakes it for an essential, religious structure of a bygone civilization. Thus, the TV becomes the "sacred altar," because everything in a motel room faces the TV; the toilet seat is a sacred collar one must wear before shouting, down the hole, to the gods below; etc. But Macaulay wears out the thin premise quickly and doesn't know how to keep good satire away from mere stupid jokes. For some reason, he thinks his protagonist's life and foibles, mentioned repeatedly and exhaustingly, contribute to the overall effect. He's wrong.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    Wonderful short story that takes place in the future. An old motel is accidentally discovered by a gentleman running a marathon. He and a team excavate the site and are entranced by what they discover. Their conclusions are not what you expect. This book gives a satirical look at the different conclusions archaeologists and anthropologists come up with regarding ancient dig sites and shows that what we think happened may not be the case at all.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    This was a good quick read book. It has an interesting point of view. It looks back on our time from the distant future. It shows how many misconceptions there are in history. It makes you think about how many things we think we know that are not true. Very fun to read this book while reading the other book that I just reviewed about Egypt.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Granny

    This book cracks me up! In fact, it produced endless moments of hilarity in the early 1980's, when my then teenaged sons and I would read passages aloud and just about roll on the floor! A great spoof and it bears up bravely upon re-reading years later.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This doesn't get less funny with age--rather, more so!

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