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The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan

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The final installment of bestselling P. B. Kerr's magical Children of the Lamp series! Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another enchanting, and dangerous, adventure in the last book in the bestselling Children of the Lamp series. As volcanoes begin erupting all over the world, spilling golden lava, the twins must go on a hunt for the wicked djinn who wants to rob th The final installment of bestselling P. B. Kerr's magical Children of the Lamp series! Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another enchanting, and dangerous, adventure in the last book in the bestselling Children of the Lamp series. As volcanoes begin erupting all over the world, spilling golden lava, the twins must go on a hunt for the wicked djinn who wants to rob the grave of the great Genghis Khan. Can the twins stop this latest disaster before the world is overwhelmed? Join John and Philippa, their parents, Uncle Nimrod, and Groanin as they must defeat an evil more powerful than any they've ever faced before. . . .


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The final installment of bestselling P. B. Kerr's magical Children of the Lamp series! Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another enchanting, and dangerous, adventure in the last book in the bestselling Children of the Lamp series. As volcanoes begin erupting all over the world, spilling golden lava, the twins must go on a hunt for the wicked djinn who wants to rob th The final installment of bestselling P. B. Kerr's magical Children of the Lamp series! Djinn twins John and Philippa are off on another enchanting, and dangerous, adventure in the last book in the bestselling Children of the Lamp series. As volcanoes begin erupting all over the world, spilling golden lava, the twins must go on a hunt for the wicked djinn who wants to rob the grave of the great Genghis Khan. Can the twins stop this latest disaster before the world is overwhelmed? Join John and Philippa, their parents, Uncle Nimrod, and Groanin as they must defeat an evil more powerful than any they've ever faced before. . . .

30 review for The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darth J

    1.5 stars for this book 2.5 for the series overall When I first looked into this series I thought it had everything I wanted: a supernatural element, international adventures, and no romance. By those qualities alone, I should have loved these books. But I didn't. The first one was okay and usually when I read the first book in a series, I just binge buy the rest so I can read them all at once. I need to stop doing that. This isn't to say that I hated these books, only that they were not very ente 1.5 stars for this book 2.5 for the series overall When I first looked into this series I thought it had everything I wanted: a supernatural element, international adventures, and no romance. By those qualities alone, I should have loved these books. But I didn't. The first one was okay and usually when I read the first book in a series, I just binge buy the rest so I can read them all at once. I need to stop doing that. This isn't to say that I hated these books, only that they were not very entertaining. I wanted to like that the author seems to know a lot of facts about so many subjects. He peppers each page so liberally with random trivia that sometimes these stories come off more as textbooks than novels. That's probably the biggest problem with the Children of the Lamp series: it's so dry and boring. When there is action going on: you don't care. The author doesn't flesh out the characters much more than giving each a few quirks, so you don't really get invested with them; and when they die: you don't care. When there is supposed to be some big bad doing something dangerous: you don't care. When the author breaks his previously established rules: you don't care. Because everything is just so meh: you really just don't care. There were a lot of loose ends that I didn't care for either. Since the first book, the audience was led to believe that Iblis was supposed to be the villain, but instead he just winds up entombed in some terra cotta armor somehow. His son, Dybbuk was then set up to be the final bad, but he wastes his powers, but then gets them back by killing the good side of himself. There was even a hinted romance between Dybbuk and Philippa at one point and that never comes to anything. Even Groanin, who admits to being racist in one of the books, never grows as a person or says to himself that maybe his prejudices are short-sighted. The storyline about the Blue Djinn of Babylon (who is kind of the president of Djinn affairs and whatnot) is only applicable for 2 out of 7 books. What happened to that Alembic Hall place? Also, whatever happened to the housekeeper's soul when the mother stole her body? What happened with the world's supply of luck that good djinn and bad djinn were supposed to be fighting over (which was the premise of the series)? What I'm saying is that while the author droned on and on about useless facts in his series, he forgot about major arcs that he set up in previous books; it's apparent that these novels are less about the story and more about trivia. This final installment was another waste. There's a new villain who only shows himself in the last 50 or so pages and wants to cause all of the world's volcanos to explode because he loves Genghis Khan and chocolate. You heard me right. That's his motive. (view spoiler)[2 Djinn, 1 Quaesitor There's a scene when John is interrogating someone and uses a special djinn binding called a "quaesitor" which makes the person spit up anything they think is vile until they reveal the information the djinn is looking for. John has spit up vegetables in the past, which I think proves how much the author panders to children because "kids hate veggies, amirite?". On a side note to that, a 14 year old who grew up in high society in New York like John should honestly have a better palate, jussayin'. Back to my original point, in this novel a person spits up a piece of camel dung. Yes, you read that right: a character hacks up a piece of camel shit in a childrens book. Just let that digest for a moment. (hide spoiler)] John seems to be like Sterling Archer sometimes because he is mostly dumb as a brick and hates learning, but seems to just have a deep understanding of really random things throughout the books. Philippa, who has red hair and glasses, almost had a romance with Dybbuk in a few books, but now is crushing on a married man and thinks there might be something between them. He is married. She is 14. The end is so stupid by having the children hold hands and make it rain all over the world to stop the volcanos from erupting. The children then "sacrifice" their powers and are happy about it: "You know what I'm looking forward to most?... Living a normal life... Not being special. Not being important. Just being ordinary." -pp.432 I'm sorry, but that is an awful message for kids. Be happy to not be exceptional? Are you kidding me?! Without people trying hard and harnessing their individual talents, our world will have no one innovating in any field. Medicine and technology would stagnate and our society would never move forward. We would neither better ourselves nor solve our current problems. There's a much better message for kids out there, that contradicts Kerr's: [drops mic]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    This final installment of my favourite series is a teensy bit disappointing. While I understand that all good things must come to an end, I, like so many others, want to cling onto the characters I love until the bitter end, so I was sad. I must admit, I actually cried. And even though there's very little closure (an epilogue would have been nice, Mr. Kerr!) I think, by going back and reading the series over again (I hadn't read any of the books for at least a couple years by the time I got my h This final installment of my favourite series is a teensy bit disappointing. While I understand that all good things must come to an end, I, like so many others, want to cling onto the characters I love until the bitter end, so I was sad. I must admit, I actually cried. And even though there's very little closure (an epilogue would have been nice, Mr. Kerr!) I think, by going back and reading the series over again (I hadn't read any of the books for at least a couple years by the time I got my hands on this one,) I've finally figured out what happened to Buck! (view spoiler)[BUCK/DYBBUK GOT FRIED BY ALL THE VOLCANO STUFFS THAT WERE ERUPTING IN PERU IN THE FIFTH BOOK, PEOPLE! WE'RE SUPPOSED TO THINK HIM DEAD! (hide spoiler)] Depressing, I know, but that's just my belief. If you think about it, it makes sense. So, all in all, this wasn't my favourite book of the series, but still pretty good! (oh, and psst! hey, if you're like me and don't want to give up the characters, that's what fanfictions are for! There are lots of good ones for this series! That makes me happy...)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mattie D

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What a dissappointing end to a usually great book series. It starts with the problem of volcanoes needing to be exterminated. That's all fine and dandy until we have to go across the world and then BACK when they realize that the problem is right where their vacation was. In other words; utterly pointless adventure. Then, they easily destroy the villian and the twins give up their powers. What the heck?! I waited years for the last book, just to find out they lost the powers??!! It was not a goo What a dissappointing end to a usually great book series. It starts with the problem of volcanoes needing to be exterminated. That's all fine and dandy until we have to go across the world and then BACK when they realize that the problem is right where their vacation was. In other words; utterly pointless adventure. Then, they easily destroy the villian and the twins give up their powers. What the heck?! I waited years for the last book, just to find out they lost the powers??!! It was not a good ending for me. Plus, Mr. Kerr added no closure to some characters what so ever. What happened to Dybbuk, Faustina, Layla??

  4. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The last book! Honestly, I was near tears when John and Phiippa lost their powers. I almost screamed when Nimrod told John he was running short on powers himself. This was an amazing finishing book to one heck of an amazing book series. As many readers of this series probably say I wish it could have continued, but I understand why it couldn't. Also while reading through the Author's Note I was surprised, and yet somehow I knew it from the begging, that the character Charlie who gave up his life The last book! Honestly, I was near tears when John and Phiippa lost their powers. I almost screamed when Nimrod told John he was running short on powers himself. This was an amazing finishing book to one heck of an amazing book series. As many readers of this series probably say I wish it could have continued, but I understand why it couldn't. Also while reading through the Author's Note I was surprised, and yet somehow I knew it from the begging, that the character Charlie who gave up his life for Philippa is also the name of one of her children. As an aspiring author myself I took what was said in the author's note to heart. I've always been willing to work for it and now I know that is how all writers start out, not just me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Fabian Sauceda

    The book “The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan” by Philip Kerr talks a lot about the end of the world, and the only way to save it is for John and Philippa to give up their djinn power or magic.They come across a lot of challenges when trying to figure out where Genghis Khan’s grave is so they know how to save the world. This book has a lot of action will probably give you enough detail on an object in the book that you will be able to form a visual of the sentence that you just read. To find out w The book “The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan” by Philip Kerr talks a lot about the end of the world, and the only way to save it is for John and Philippa to give up their djinn power or magic.They come across a lot of challenges when trying to figure out where Genghis Khan’s grave is so they know how to save the world. This book has a lot of action will probably give you enough detail on an object in the book that you will be able to form a visual of the sentence that you just read. To find out what John and Philippa do read the book and I hope you enjoy it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Not a bad book, but certainly not a great ending to this fantastic series. Firstly, Kerr got a little too wrapped up in the science around the story and in making sure we all know just how smart Philippa and her brother are. It really slowed the story down. The storyline its self, espceially the side track after Groanin leaves Nimrod's service are spectacular. Not a bad book, just weighed down by the science and a clunky ending. Not a bad book, but certainly not a great ending to this fantastic series. Firstly, Kerr got a little too wrapped up in the science around the story and in making sure we all know just how smart Philippa and her brother are. It really slowed the story down. The storyline its self, espceially the side track after Groanin leaves Nimrod's service are spectacular. Not a bad book, just weighed down by the science and a clunky ending.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cat Chiappa

    I have enjoyed this series over the past seven years but this last book was a disappointing finish. I enjoyed the book right up until the last 50 pages but I felt the rest was tied up rather hastily and was a letdown for what was a rather enjoyable series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy reader

    that is soo stupid how they ended it!! I mean I fell in love with the characters and plot dont get me wrong the series is great but what happened you know! I mean,what also happened to the whole Dybbuk and Phillipa thing!! The ending terrible, the memories AMAZING!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

    I didn't like this one as well as I have liked some of the others. I'm not sure I loved how it ended, especially as it is the end of the entire series. I didn't like this one as well as I have liked some of the others. I'm not sure I loved how it ended, especially as it is the end of the entire series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This wasn't enthralling at all. I never got excited about it and had no problem leaving it for two days to read The Economist. A real disappointment as a series ending! This wasn't enthralling at all. I never got excited about it and had no problem leaving it for two days to read The Economist. A real disappointment as a series ending!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    A bit preachy at the end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    P.B. Kerr, also known to readers of his adult fiction as Philip Kerr, wraps up his seven-book "Children of the Lamp" series with this book, in which 14-year-old twin djinn Philippa and John Gaunt face the possibility that they must make the ultimate sacrifice to save the world. Someone has found, and worse still, plundered the tomb of 13th-century Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan, and used something buried with him to start a worldwide plague of volcanic eruptions that could spell doom for life as P.B. Kerr, also known to readers of his adult fiction as Philip Kerr, wraps up his seven-book "Children of the Lamp" series with this book, in which 14-year-old twin djinn Philippa and John Gaunt face the possibility that they must make the ultimate sacrifice to save the world. Someone has found, and worse still, plundered the tomb of 13th-century Mongol conqueror Genghis Khan, and used something buried with him to start a worldwide plague of volcanic eruptions that could spell doom for life as we know it. To find him and stop him, they must solve the 800-year-old mystery of where the tyrant was buried, an adventure spanning several continents, reviving the all-but-lost art of using flying carpets, and costing the life of more than one beloved friend. And it all seems to lead to the fulfillment of a grim prophecy about twin djinn. Meantime, the twins' Uncle Nimrod's aptly-named butler Groanin gives his notice, only to have a series of misadventures that teach him the lesson, "You don't know what you have till it's gone." Between the twins and their hapless human friend, the characters in this book experience a timeless Moroccan bazaar, a walkabout in the Australian outback, a kidnap by ice-cream-truck-driving gangsters in Italy, a stay with a gang of glamorous Romanian teens, a cruise with Somali pirates, a road trip with fanatical Yemeni hoodlums, and a way-too-close encounter with a gigantic creepy-crawly in the streets of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Most of the experiences on that list fall to poor, homebody Groanin, but the twins have their share of thrills and chills too, such as when their attempt to possess a herd of wild camels leads to a brush with a terrifying spirit, and when the lightning bug of your nightmares stalks them in the mist on a Mongolian steppe. I think it's a pity Kerr decided to end the twins' adventures here. Unlike him, I didn't see the inevitability of their exit from the world of djinn power, and I think the series could be plausibly revived. After all, there are still 19 letters of the alphabet from which he can cull the initials of the titles of their further adventures. And with each adventure touching on pages of history and patches of the globe that aren't often covered in teen fiction, there is also plenty of potential for more culturally enriching, educational fun, with emphasis on the fun. This series is full of beauty spots that readers of different skill levels can appreciate, such as the hilarious sentence (from The Five Fakirs of Faizabad) "John could see Dracula's point," and the late Mr. Rakshasas' wise aphorism, "The future is certain. It's the past you can't predict." If this really is the end for the Gaunts, it will be interesting to see what new marvel Kerr invents next.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    The short: The final installment of the Children of the Lamp series. A good solid, “MEH.” The long: It started off as a good series, truly. I remember reading The Akhenaten Adventure multiple times when I was younger, loving this particular interpretation of djinn (my first introduction to the concept beyond “Genie” from Disney’s Aladdin), learning about magic and Egypt, and wishing I too could be half-djinn. But maybe being on the bestsellers’ list got to Kerr’s head or maybe the editors slac The short: The final installment of the Children of the Lamp series. A good solid, “MEH.” The long: It started off as a good series, truly. I remember reading The Akhenaten Adventure multiple times when I was younger, loving this particular interpretation of djinn (my first introduction to the concept beyond “Genie” from Disney’s Aladdin), learning about magic and Egypt, and wishing I too could be half-djinn. But maybe being on the bestsellers’ list got to Kerr’s head or maybe the editors slacked off a little (heaven forbid), because the rest of the series just isn’t that great. I don’t want to blame getting older, either, because I lost interest by around the fifth book, when I realized the only reason I asked for it for Christmas was because it bothered me that I owned the first four, but not the rest – and then it took me a few months to finally get around to reading it. I essentially gave up the series, and the reason I’m returning to it now is similarly because it bothers me that I never finished it. It takes quite a lot for me to designate a book or series as “DNF,” usually only due to sheer tedium (looking at you, Tom Clancy) or something I find offensive or otherwise upsetting. It rarely happens, and currently in my mission to put a slight dent in my neverending “To Read” list, I’m going back through all such series to finish them off once and for all! *cue confetti* Back to The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan. I will grant one concession to it being boring now that I’m older, because it also means I’m more widely read. It’s hard not to compare this book and its predecessors to Percy Jackson or the Bartimaeus series. Those books made you really care about the characters, care in the sense that you were happy when they were successful and cried when they failed (or died, as the case may be). Those characters also developed – or to put a less literary spin on it, they changed as time went on. Weaknesses became strengths, strengths revealed flaws, flaws were embraced, and the reader was carried along that bumpy, exhilarating ride. John and Phillipa rarely roused my emotions, especially since they were often horrible to each other (in that bland, one-liner, Teen Nick kind of way). My favorite character was Nimrod, and only because he could do – and did do – everything in an awesome way, and it’s kinda hard to dislike someone like that. In the sixth book, The Five Fakirs of Faizabad , I noticed the bizarre insertions of political opinion, obstinately put there by the narrator/author (the books are in third-person omniscient), and since these are firmly aimed at middle school children, it seems a bit odd for Kerr to be putting in these kind of “facts,” which are largely subjective, if not utterly ethnocentric. To be sure, he makes fun of the British quite often (as he himself is), but that doesn’t really excuse making sweeping generalizations about other cultures, even if it is a mostly positive way (or from a “racist” character like Groanin – “No, he said that because he’s xenophobic, hahaha, you’re not supposed to listen to him!”). I don’t know how else to describe it, but it was off-putting, and luckily, there wasn’t too much of that in the seventh book. John and Phillipa both have all the personality of a Wiki page describing them in outline form, and not much else. Phillipa: book smart, sarcastic, loves animals. John: book dumb, a bit of a pushover, creative. And we’re told those traits multiple times, not shown in what they say or how they act. It’s the epitome of why it’s so important to show, not tell. And Kerr loves to tell. Again, I feel I have to compare him to Rick Riordan, whose novels are also full of interesting facts told both in descriptions and expository dialogue, but Kerr sticks such information in long paragraphs and monologues that would sound perfectly boring in actual speech. It’s not that much of an issue, since info dumps are always difficult to pull off, but the execution in this book still wasn’t the greatest. It doesn’t help that Kerr is fiercely British, and despite John and Phillipa’s purported American cluelessness about that culture, they talk in a very English way, even using vocal mannerisms that no New York teen would ever use. Perhaps Kerr was trying to avoid Harry Potter allusions or appeal to the US market, but since practically everyone else is English or European, it might’ve been simpler to stick the whole series in England. (view spoiler)[ The ending wasn’t great. Not only did I see it coming from a mile away (rare for me, tbh), but again, because I really didn’t care about the twins, I didn’t care about them sacrificing their powers to save the world. On one hand, huzzah, they’re decent people who did the right thing because the alternative was world-ending destruction! But on the other, no fourteen-year-old (or forty-year-old, even) would give up reality-altering superpowers and not care at all. Phillipa, at least, had a couple books’ worth of foreshadowing about her doubting her abilities, but John reveled in them, torturing a man with them mere days earlier in one very awkward scene. So for them to go happily back to their normal lives may have been Kerr trying to send some sort of important message about normalcy being just as cool as magical or something? Or that working for your wishes is better than instantly granting them? That one’s not so bad, but it was rather hammered home throughout the entire series, so to have it end up as a sort of punishment kinda misses the point. Charlie and Axel’s deaths were sad only because they died quite awfully (and Charlie’s was certainly preventable), but I didn’t feel upset about them (nor did any of the other characters, really). The whole subplot with Groanin kept the action going between the dull carpet rides, but it ultimately petered out to nothing, so it was kind of a waste of time. And Alexandra was a really weird diversion, her portrayal vaguely offensive, and with the whole Cassandra truth thing, her presence largely pointless. (hide spoiler)] There’s no return of any previous secondary characters, and the villain isn’t exactly that villainous. Any dangling plot lines aren’t tied up, and no trailing mysteries are solved. If I had read them all recently (or at least, remembered them better), I probably would’ve been much more disappointed about that, but quite frankly, I just wanted to find out what happened at the end and finish this series for good. Despite all the criticisms above, I know it’s really hard to write one book, let alone seven, and forget about it being popular enough to have any sort of demand. Kerr may have ended up dropping the ball with this series, but it did start off very strong and the entire concept was incredibly unique. The development of the djinn culture and how their powers work was solid, and research was definitely done in regards to ancient history and mythology. I’m glad I finished it, and I think I would recommend it as middle school reading, though preferably in a school or parental setting, where the more iffy bits can be explained properly. Lots of morals about wishing for – and getting – whatever you want, and why that can end up being a good or bad thing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    This is by far the worst book in the series. John and Philippa have to save the world from volcanic eruptions and make the ultimate sacrifice to do so: (view spoiler)[their powers *gasp* (hide spoiler)] . It was the worst writing in a poorly written series already. "It was Kilauea that destroyed our mother's physical body, and obliged her to take on the shape of Mrs. Trump, our housekeeper"- written to refresh memory of readers because John, to whom Philippa is talking, would obviously know who Mr This is by far the worst book in the series. John and Philippa have to save the world from volcanic eruptions and make the ultimate sacrifice to do so: (view spoiler)[their powers *gasp* (hide spoiler)] . It was the worst writing in a poorly written series already. "It was Kilauea that destroyed our mother's physical body, and obliged her to take on the shape of Mrs. Trump, our housekeeper"- written to refresh memory of readers because John, to whom Philippa is talking, would obviously know who Mrs. Trump is. This type of clunky overly formal (or incorrectly informal) writing plagues this book more than the previous ones. Unnecessary appositives abound where the author tries to remind readers of what happened in previous books in the worst and most stilted way possible. Additionally, why, in every single book in this series, are there so many passages about how twins have special powers of telepathy even in humans? WE GET IT, THEY KNOW EACH OTHER WELL! It just became ridiculous in this book because this paragraph was inserted so many times. Also, I get that the mafia is supposed to be a joke, but can this not be look like it was written by a 5 year old: let's sell Groanin to the Romanian mafia, "they're much more ruthless than we are. Every flaw from the series is amplified here

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Ellis

    The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan is the last book of the Children of the Lamp series. In this installment, djinn twins, John and Phillipa, and their Uncle Nimrod must determine why all the volcanoes of the world are suddenly erupting and stop the natural disasters from creating mass destruction. Their detective work leads them to the tomb of Genghis Khan where they discover that special crystals have been stolen. The crystals are the key. John and Phillipa learn that saving the world will requi The Grave Robbers of Genghis Khan is the last book of the Children of the Lamp series. In this installment, djinn twins, John and Phillipa, and their Uncle Nimrod must determine why all the volcanoes of the world are suddenly erupting and stop the natural disasters from creating mass destruction. Their detective work leads them to the tomb of Genghis Khan where they discover that special crystals have been stolen. The crystals are the key. John and Phillipa learn that saving the world will require great sacrifice. Will they being willing to do it? As with the other books of the series, the narration adds a good dose of humor. Kids will find the "belchin" names of the camels hilarious. The grumpy butler, Mr. Groanin, adds more comedy to the story. For those who enjoy trivia, there are some interesting facts sprinkled throughout the story. The plot contains some interesting twists, and even though some of the situations are a little unbelievable, most kids will enjoy the adventure. Recommended for middle grade readers. -Sherry Ellis, author of Bubba and Squirt's Big Dig to China

  16. 4 out of 5

    Beka

    Well, I'm glad I read this story, but I'm also glad that it's the end of the series. I just felt like the books were starting to rehash themselves, so I'm happy that this could be a good finish with things tied up. Well, I'm glad I read this story, but I'm also glad that it's the end of the series. I just felt like the books were starting to rehash themselves, so I'm happy that this could be a good finish with things tied up.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5 This book was worse than the others, but I think part of that is because it is the last book in the series. Also, I think that it is 3.5 because John, Philippa, and Nimrod loose their Djinn powers at the end.😱

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Huninghake

    I’ve read most of this series and love the characters and adventures as well as the history and science I have learned along the way. Kerr researches beautifully and keeps you engaged from beginning to end.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Potgieter

    It took me a while to reakky enjoy the book but after a while I couldnt put it down. Now i hope my mom buys me the rest of the series

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    Shame, this series was really growing on me but this was a very disappointing end. The author's note told me to wipe the tear from my eye after I'd finished the book (uh, arrogant!) but, sorry P.B. Kerr, I wasn't crying. Overall, the whole storyline and idea of this book was just plain dumb. (view spoiler)[I mean, some random guy is trying to destroy the world so he can eat more chocolate?!?!?!?!? I don't think I need to say any more, it was ridiculously stupid. (hide spoiler)] This is what I expe Shame, this series was really growing on me but this was a very disappointing end. The author's note told me to wipe the tear from my eye after I'd finished the book (uh, arrogant!) but, sorry P.B. Kerr, I wasn't crying. Overall, the whole storyline and idea of this book was just plain dumb. (view spoiler)[I mean, some random guy is trying to destroy the world so he can eat more chocolate?!?!?!?!? I don't think I need to say any more, it was ridiculously stupid. (hide spoiler)] This is what I expected this book to be, and what it should have been: The end of the world! How are they ever going to win this time? Return of Iblis or Dybbuk as the enemy. Adventurous, dramatic, action-packed, fun and epic. Shows you what being a djinn is really like (maybe what happens if a "good" djinn turns "bad"). Return of all our favourite characters; Faustina, Edwards Gaunt's brothers (those ones that used to be dogs, can't remember their names), Zadie, Dybbuk, Finley etc. What it really was: A completely new and random enemy who is trying to wreck the entire Earth for no reason. Philippa getting a crush on a grown and married man (if Philippa had to had a crush couldn't it have been on Dybbuk or Finley?) The return of . . . let's think . . . nobody! A WAY too easy fix and abrupt and unsatisfactory end. A completely bad moral: "Being special is just the worst, it's brilliant to be normal and just like everybody else!" A pretty dull and totally weird adventure that only brought them right back to where they started. Tiny hints of drama that then get objected instantly: "Do you think Nimrod's dying?" *GASP* "No, he's fine" *Oh.* You'd think, this being the last in the series, it would be a mega-awesome global trip around the world, full of action and adventure. Well, sorry to let you down, but it wasn't. Two thirds of the book was just sitting on a flying carpet for hours on end. Seriously, here are some of the genuine chapter titles: Deep Thought, Food, Glorious Food and Suspicious Minds I wasn't bored, because at least they talked to eachother, but I wasn't excited either. Here's a quote from John: "At last," said John. "We're going to see some action," That was on pg370, of an 416 page book. You might be thinking: "Oh well, at least there's some action then" Wrong again! Even after that quote the action level was very low. The whole ending was so rushed and (I'll say it again) had an appalling moral. I don't think the series need to go on this long, five books at the most would have been perfect. I did enjoy this book, it was pleasurable and readable, but I look to be excited or blown away by books. This did neither. Kind of a disappointment, bad end to the series, but the book itself was okay. EDIT: 27/07/2014 My sister just finished the book and pointed out that the moral isn't actually what I made it out to be. Apparently in the author's note it says that the moral is actually that you should have to work to get your wishes granted rather than having them granted for you instantly. That's much better. :)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The final adventure in this ‘djinncredible’ series. Seven books, so many characters, a lot of travelling and so much fun! In the first book we met the two djinn twins John and Philippa and they go on a search for Akhenaten and his lost tomb. In the second book they meet the Blue Djinn of Babylon who decides Phillippa should take over, leaving John to rescue her. In the third book they discover a creepy cult set on capturing djinn and extracting their blood. In the fourth book the twins have to r The final adventure in this ‘djinncredible’ series. Seven books, so many characters, a lot of travelling and so much fun! In the first book we met the two djinn twins John and Philippa and they go on a search for Akhenaten and his lost tomb. In the second book they meet the Blue Djinn of Babylon who decides Phillippa should take over, leaving John to rescue her. In the third book they discover a creepy cult set on capturing djinn and extracting their blood. In the fourth book the twins have to rescue their mum from her fate as the Blue Djinn of Babylon meanwhile a curse on their dad means he’s aging rapidly while they’re away. In the fifth book Faustina urges Nimrod to go to the rainforest and discover the Eye of the Forest before anyone else has a chance to discover it, open it and, basically, end the world and in the sixth book the luck of the world is messed up and somehow the twins along with a host of friends must somehow restore proper balance. And finally, the final book in the Children of the Lamp series by P.B Kerr. Volcanoes are erupting all over the world, even ones that have been dormant for thousands of years and some even supposedly extinct. I noticed a couple of things in the author’s note that I wanted to mention. 1. Goodbyeeee! Goodbyeeee! Wipe the tear, baby dear, from your eyeeee! 1a. I wasn’t crying 1b. What’s with all the e’s? 2. Kerr said that originally he had been planning to write more than seven COTL’s. I don’t think that the series could have stretched any longer. I also think that most series can’t really last well for more than 5 books unless they have a clearly defined routine with wiggly room. (e.g. each book is a year at school) 3. Kerr says that the character he is most like is Groanin. I have to say I love Groanin but he can be a rasict! He even admits it. Why did you add that side to his character Mr Kerr, I say why did you add that side to his character? Throughout the series they are a few storylines that didn’t really make sense or weren’t really tied up. A few (lot) of the deaths weren’t final. If death isn’t final, WHAT IS!?! 1. Dybukk – I assumed he died in the radioactive thingy. 2. Iblis – He’s still in a stone statue or something? The other thing is that the enemy’s kept changing. How can a 7 book series end by defeating an enemy they met in the 7th book? I did enjoy lots about this series as you can tell by the 4 and 5 star ratings I gave them; the adventure and the magic mostly. It’s just disappointing that there are so many hard to pronounce (and understand) words in a series meant for children. The ending was ok. (view spoiler)[ Kind of lame how they travelled all around the world to check something they already knew and then travel back to where they started to hold hands and do a rain dance, then lose their powers and be happy about...being...normal. Great stuff, isn’t it just. (hide spoiler)]

  22. 4 out of 5

    J. Else

    Not a bad book, but certainly not a great one, and one that is an ending to this imaginative and fun series. First of all, what happened to Dybbuk??? The end of book 5 Dybbuk crushes the good half of himself and recovers his djinn powers. And NOTHING??? That was a big cliffhanger! NOTHING??? It made me feel like the previous books were moot. What was the point to “Eye of the Forest,” my favorite one of the series? And what about their mother? Their father? I was hoping for some kind of ending th Not a bad book, but certainly not a great one, and one that is an ending to this imaginative and fun series. First of all, what happened to Dybbuk??? The end of book 5 Dybbuk crushes the good half of himself and recovers his djinn powers. And NOTHING??? That was a big cliffhanger! NOTHING??? It made me feel like the previous books were moot. What was the point to “Eye of the Forest,” my favorite one of the series? And what about their mother? Their father? I was hoping for some kind of ending that included their family. Maybe an epilogue or something. This book felt a little tired. It felt like everyone was rather ho-hum about everything as the plot progressed. There was fun adventure, but there was a missing spark of excitement that the previous books possessed. There were also very few difficulties and hardships the characters faced along the way. I am glad the kidnapping of Groanan did not go on for too long. It was just the right amount to be amusing and then even more fulfilling when he was reunited with his companions. Also, the motivations and discovery of the villain was really a let down. The villain has no role in the first 4/5 of the book, then becomes this easy to possess and stop character that holds no weight to the storyline. He found the tomb of Genghis Khan! He’s got to have some kind of intelligence. A great book is made partially by its good guy but also largely in part due to its bad guy. This book was lacking a really good and quirky villain character. I kept HOPING it would turn out that Dybbuk was pulling the chocolatier’s strings. Very disappointed in the last few chapters. Give us an ending worthy of all the other books in the series. What happened to the evil tribe of djinn? They didn’t want to try to help the villain with his quest? And to be honest, the motivation of the villain was lame. Again, this seems like a product resulting from the tiredness this book felt weighed down with. It was fun that P.B. Kerr added a bit about the development of this series at the end. I enjoyed reading the way things started for these characters. I also have fun with the educational bits Kerr adds to each book. I certainly learned a lot about volcanoes! But compared to the other books, this story was a disappointment. The adventures seemed rather easy compared to the previous obstacles the djinn have faced. It was just too easy a read and too simple an ending for these complex and smart characters.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    My Summary: While on holiday with their uncle Nimrod, djinn twins John and Philippa witness something incredible: a previously dormant volcano erupts, spewing a strange golden substance. As more an more reports flood in from around the world describing a vast amount of these inexplicable events, the twins (and Nimrod and Groanin, of course) are spurred into action, setting off on what will be their final adventure. My Thoughts: When one of your all-time favourite series ends, you have to grieve a My Summary: While on holiday with their uncle Nimrod, djinn twins John and Philippa witness something incredible: a previously dormant volcano erupts, spewing a strange golden substance. As more an more reports flood in from around the world describing a vast amount of these inexplicable events, the twins (and Nimrod and Groanin, of course) are spurred into action, setting off on what will be their final adventure. My Thoughts: When one of your all-time favourite series ends, you have to grieve a little. You just have to. And an amazing series like this one deserves to be grieved. Not many people have had the pleasure of reading this series, which is unfortunate. The writing is awesome and intelligent and doesn't make the reader feel 'talked down to' like some children's books. I began reading these books at the age of 9 or 10 and adored them, and to this day I still adore them and laugh at the jokes and the puns. I always loved the way that facts were sprinkled into the novel, teaching you a little something while entertaining you at the same time. These books are pure brilliance, and I am extremely sad to see the end of the series. I'll definitely be re-reading them and passing them on to my 11 year old brother... and then probably to my kids one day! I adore this series, but that doesn't mean it's without its faults. There were a few loose ends left at the end of this one that irked me... but I think the author may have left them purposely. Who knows? Final Thoughts: If you're looking for a funny, intelligent series to give to the kids who've outgrown children's novels, this series is for you. It's also great for anyone looking for a refreshing, interesting read. I swear you will not regret picking it up.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    This book was the best in the series, even though the ending was not what I would have wished for. Overall, the main drag was that there was so much explanation of the scenery and the camels that I almost did not finish. I was amused, as any teen or tween would be, by the camel names: Dunbelchin, and her offspring/descendants, Vilebelchin, Rudebelchin, and other burping dromedaries. The storyline continues from previous books, with the luck of the world askew, and several characters are involved This book was the best in the series, even though the ending was not what I would have wished for. Overall, the main drag was that there was so much explanation of the scenery and the camels that I almost did not finish. I was amused, as any teen or tween would be, by the camel names: Dunbelchin, and her offspring/descendants, Vilebelchin, Rudebelchin, and other burping dromedaries. The storyline continues from previous books, with the luck of the world askew, and several characters are involved with different aspects. It takes the characters a while to figure out that erupting volcanoes are everywhere (view spoiler)[ and even longer to tie the volcanoes and the problem together (hide spoiler)] . I did not like the long winded explanations of what is happening, (view spoiler)[ or what seemed a cavalier reaction to the death of Charlie - a real 14 year old would have been freaking under those same circumstances (hide spoiler)] and I especially did not like the repeat of the effort to get flying carpets for the twins, but I did like the return of the rug man. I liked that we get to meet Nimrod's estranged wife, and meet several new characters who explain things in a simple way without actually talking down to the twins. Overall, I liked everything, including the ending, sad as it was.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Perry

    Years ago when I got this series I was so deliriously happy with it and today I have to say goodbye. Like the twins in this series I find the ending a bittersweet thing. This was one of the series I didn't finish collecting until I was an adult. Well actually this was the last book from back then that I hadn't gotten. I think I put it off so that the twins would forever be granting wishes in my mind. Sadly in this novel they had to grow up. The author's writing was just as good as ever and I fou Years ago when I got this series I was so deliriously happy with it and today I have to say goodbye. Like the twins in this series I find the ending a bittersweet thing. This was one of the series I didn't finish collecting until I was an adult. Well actually this was the last book from back then that I hadn't gotten. I think I put it off so that the twins would forever be granting wishes in my mind. Sadly in this novel they had to grow up. The author's writing was just as good as ever and I found myself transported to something magical and I really hated to see it end. The climax left me crying but the last page had me balling. The last two words The End tore me up. I hope that PB Kerr returns to another middle grade series soon because I want to have something I can share with my son and yet remember where I have already been.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    John and Philipa along with their Uncle Nimrod and his butler Groanin are trying to find out why all the volcanos of the world are getting ready to erupt. They get to spend time in Italy, Australia and Mongolia trying to find Genghis Khan's grave to stop a global catastrophe. As in the other books, the facts are a little shaky but I doubt children will notice or care. Unlike the other books, the villain is underdeveloped and it seems too much like a quick fix. Some series end because it's a st John and Philipa along with their Uncle Nimrod and his butler Groanin are trying to find out why all the volcanos of the world are getting ready to erupt. They get to spend time in Italy, Australia and Mongolia trying to find Genghis Khan's grave to stop a global catastrophe. As in the other books, the facts are a little shaky but I doubt children will notice or care. Unlike the other books, the villain is underdeveloped and it seems too much like a quick fix. Some series end because it's a story that needs a clear ending. Some end because the author runs out of ideas. As much as in the Author's Notes Kerr claims it isn't true, the book seems like he was sick of the whole thing and wanted to make sure that people understood that there would be no more. The ending was a big let down and for a last book, it seemed like some important characters were left out.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Caelle

    I started reading this series when I was about 9. I don't really remember what the first books were about. But when I heard there was a 7th book I went wild with joy. But this book didn't really hook my attention like the rest of the books did when I was younger and less critical. I followed along on their adventure, was interested in what was happening, I was surprised a few times, and at the end I was rather nostalgic. I loved the familiar characters, but I couldn't get connected to the book. I started reading this series when I was about 9. I don't really remember what the first books were about. But when I heard there was a 7th book I went wild with joy. But this book didn't really hook my attention like the rest of the books did when I was younger and less critical. I followed along on their adventure, was interested in what was happening, I was surprised a few times, and at the end I was rather nostalgic. I loved the familiar characters, but I couldn't get connected to the book. So I'm giving this three stars for an interesting plot and childhood memories.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Soňa

    very interesting ending, was wondering why it will end to know if there will be more parts or not. Well, got my answer and to spoil the review, can say usual pack of action some influencing others some standing on its own. Liked the way it twisted and outlined upfront reader and when the conclusion came it was bit sad but as well enjoyable as it was very well written. Overall, liked the series, sometimes there are parts which are repeating, sometimes Groanin moans too much :-) but still very enjo very interesting ending, was wondering why it will end to know if there will be more parts or not. Well, got my answer and to spoil the review, can say usual pack of action some influencing others some standing on its own. Liked the way it twisted and outlined upfront reader and when the conclusion came it was bit sad but as well enjoyable as it was very well written. Overall, liked the series, sometimes there are parts which are repeating, sometimes Groanin moans too much :-) but still very enjoyable read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Almira

    This is the last book in the series. P.B. Kerr actually wrote "The End" after the last sentence, and the spent several pages offering why he concluded the series. This was probably the most authentic book of the series, the best written, with the most interesting information regarding volcanoes, Australia and the "songline" history of Australia, and Genghis Khan. I shall miss reading these stories. This is the last book in the series. P.B. Kerr actually wrote "The End" after the last sentence, and the spent several pages offering why he concluded the series. This was probably the most authentic book of the series, the best written, with the most interesting information regarding volcanoes, Australia and the "songline" history of Australia, and Genghis Khan. I shall miss reading these stories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Heywood

    i am sad that the series ended, but I was actually really happy how he ended it. It seemed fitting. I loved his explanation at the end of why he ended it how he did. Sometimes I understand the ending better and can come to terms with it better when the author explains why he did what he did. I wish there were going to be more, I really enjoyed this series, but I understand when a series needs to come to an end.

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