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Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking

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Finally back in print--the definitive volume on Indian vegetarian cooking. Created by a noted author and lecturer, Lord Krishna's Cuisine features more than 500 recipes, filled with fresh produce and herbs, delicate spices, hot curries, and homemade dairy products. All recipes are based on readily available ingredients and have been scrupulously adapted for American kitche Finally back in print--the definitive volume on Indian vegetarian cooking. Created by a noted author and lecturer, Lord Krishna's Cuisine features more than 500 recipes, filled with fresh produce and herbs, delicate spices, hot curries, and homemade dairy products. All recipes are based on readily available ingredients and have been scrupulously adapted for American kitchens. The recipes are enlivened by the author's anecdotes and personal reminiscences of her years in India, including stories of gathering recipes from royal families and temple cooks, which had been jealously guarded for centuries.Hailed by Gourmet as "definitive," and as "a marvelous source for vegetarians" by Bon Appetit, Devi has created the landmark work on the world's most sophisticated vegetarian cuisine. Repackaged and evocatively illustrated, Lord Krishna's Cuisine unlocks the mysteries of the most healthful and delicious recipes of the world.


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Finally back in print--the definitive volume on Indian vegetarian cooking. Created by a noted author and lecturer, Lord Krishna's Cuisine features more than 500 recipes, filled with fresh produce and herbs, delicate spices, hot curries, and homemade dairy products. All recipes are based on readily available ingredients and have been scrupulously adapted for American kitche Finally back in print--the definitive volume on Indian vegetarian cooking. Created by a noted author and lecturer, Lord Krishna's Cuisine features more than 500 recipes, filled with fresh produce and herbs, delicate spices, hot curries, and homemade dairy products. All recipes are based on readily available ingredients and have been scrupulously adapted for American kitchens. The recipes are enlivened by the author's anecdotes and personal reminiscences of her years in India, including stories of gathering recipes from royal families and temple cooks, which had been jealously guarded for centuries.Hailed by Gourmet as "definitive," and as "a marvelous source for vegetarians" by Bon Appetit, Devi has created the landmark work on the world's most sophisticated vegetarian cuisine. Repackaged and evocatively illustrated, Lord Krishna's Cuisine unlocks the mysteries of the most healthful and delicious recipes of the world.

30 review for Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking

  1. 4 out of 5

    melissa

    This thing is HUGE. It's bigger than the giant Bible my parents kept on a coffee table during my youth to scare me & my brother straight. Also, I got tattooed & I drank & I kept a stash of pot in a cookie tin in my closet back then. I need to go to church. Like now. It's a good thing I outgrew my rebellious youth and now the most fun I have on a weekend is popping mustard seeds in a skillet. I learned that from this book! I have made many a fine recipe! All vegetarian/vegan/veganizable! And no m This thing is HUGE. It's bigger than the giant Bible my parents kept on a coffee table during my youth to scare me & my brother straight. Also, I got tattooed & I drank & I kept a stash of pot in a cookie tin in my closet back then. I need to go to church. Like now. It's a good thing I outgrew my rebellious youth and now the most fun I have on a weekend is popping mustard seeds in a skillet. I learned that from this book! I have made many a fine recipe! All vegetarian/vegan/veganizable! And no matter what your hoodlum friends tell you, smoking mustard seeds will NOT get you high. I will neither confirm nor deny that I have tried this. Now go read Leviticus or something.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I received "Lord Krishna's Cuisine" as a gift, the year after it was published. I was just learning to cook seriously, and this book became my guide. Not only are the recipes extremely good, but Yamuna Devi is a delightful teacher. Woven into the chapter and recipe introductions are stories about her discovery of Indian cooking, aspects of Indian culture, and her travels through the world cooking for Srila Prabhupada, her spiritual teacher. These stories and comments add context and charm to the I received "Lord Krishna's Cuisine" as a gift, the year after it was published. I was just learning to cook seriously, and this book became my guide. Not only are the recipes extremely good, but Yamuna Devi is a delightful teacher. Woven into the chapter and recipe introductions are stories about her discovery of Indian cooking, aspects of Indian culture, and her travels through the world cooking for Srila Prabhupada, her spiritual teacher. These stories and comments add context and charm to the recipes. Additionally, the book is full of exacting, step-by-step instructions, illustrated with clear line drawings. Thanks to these fine instructions, I have fearlessly and successfully made all kinds of things (for example ghee) from scratch that I might otherwise have been intimidated to try. This cookbook has absolutely stood the test of time. Over twenty years after I first opened it, I still cook from it, still read it, and am still discovering new favorites. This is not typical Indian-restaurant fare, at least not the Indian restaurants I've eaten at. The author's tradition eschews onions and garlic, for one thing, and neither appears in a single recipe. The flavors are bright and sparkling even when complex. There are no everything-but-the-kitchen-sink curry powders here. Because of this, I've learned a lot of about spices and spice combinations. This book is probably not the best choice for armchair cooks. There are no photographs or color illustrations. Is was written by a serious cook, as a textbook for those who have the inclination to study and practice an old and sophisticated culinary tradition.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Plant Girl

    Hands down, the best Indian cookbook I have ever picked up. I have used this book to make countless meals (mostly for large groups, the recipes double, triple, quadruple easily) and I have had success with practically each and every recipe I have tried. I love that she explains things so thoroughly and oftentimes shares short anecdotes of where she learned how to make a particular recipe. I would highly recommend this to absolutely anyone wanting to learn how to cook Indian food, meateaters incl Hands down, the best Indian cookbook I have ever picked up. I have used this book to make countless meals (mostly for large groups, the recipes double, triple, quadruple easily) and I have had success with practically each and every recipe I have tried. I love that she explains things so thoroughly and oftentimes shares short anecdotes of where she learned how to make a particular recipe. I would highly recommend this to absolutely anyone wanting to learn how to cook Indian food, meateaters included (please don't be scared off by the fact that it is a vegetarian cookbook!) My only suggestion is to make sure to have all or most of the spices the recipes call for, to assure good results. It's easy to find bulk spices online for much cheaper than you can find in the grocery store, or check out the bulk sections of health food stores or the larger supermarkets.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    I cook with locally grown foodstuffs as much as possible, and I am also vegetarian. Those two facts preclude my getting into Indian cookery too intensely because I live in a northern climate where neither chickpeas nor adzukis nor lentils used in dahls are grown. Regardless, I was hoping to find more bean dishes like rajma. (No luck!) In Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, Deborah Madison recommended Yamuna Devi's book as the best book for those interested in learning more about Indian vegetarian c I cook with locally grown foodstuffs as much as possible, and I am also vegetarian. Those two facts preclude my getting into Indian cookery too intensely because I live in a northern climate where neither chickpeas nor adzukis nor lentils used in dahls are grown. Regardless, I was hoping to find more bean dishes like rajma. (No luck!) In Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, Deborah Madison recommended Yamuna Devi's book as the best book for those interested in learning more about Indian vegetarian cooking. I borrowed Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking and 1000 Great Indian Recipes from a local library for comparative purposes. Both are good books, but Devi's is all about Indian vegetarian cooking, while Datta's is for omnivores. While I found the format used by Datta more pleasing to the eye than that chosen by Devi, I found the latter's cookbook far better as a teacher. I've spent nearly a month comparing the two books, and the vegetable recipes sound wonderful in both books. If I were to own an Indian cookbook, it would be Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking because of its great instruction and because I don't need meat recipes. (Doing a comparative study of these two books was great fun!)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Wolfe

    If you could only have one cookbook, this is the one I would choose. It's easily my favorite, and without a doubt the definitive resource on Indian food for vegetarians. Since I am a vegetarian, I don't miss the meat dishes, but even before I gave up meat I loved the breadth of cuisine covered in this weighty tome. I received a copy as a gift when a naturopath insisted I had a gluten sensitivity - I didn't, but there was a few months where bread was off the menu, and it was all the Vaisnava fest If you could only have one cookbook, this is the one I would choose. It's easily my favorite, and without a doubt the definitive resource on Indian food for vegetarians. Since I am a vegetarian, I don't miss the meat dishes, but even before I gave up meat I loved the breadth of cuisine covered in this weighty tome. I received a copy as a gift when a naturopath insisted I had a gluten sensitivity - I didn't, but there was a few months where bread was off the menu, and it was all the Vaisnava festival flatbread recipes (they don't use wheat then) that my friend thought would be helpful. By the time I had made all the flatbread recipes I was completely in love with the clear, direct instructions, and the commentary on everything from temple cooking to pomegranates. It's the only book I've ever seen with a recipe for curry of young, tender loofah squashes - which works equally well for zucchini if you don't happen to have loofahs on hand. You really do have to read this cookbook. It doesn't have a photograph in it, but the recipes and descriptions of the food and where the recipe came from will give your imagination a clearer picture of the cuisine than a photograph ever will. It is truly a work of love, and of genius.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This book lives up to its reputation as a definitive Western text on Indian cooking. The multitudinous recipes are complemented by discussion of the cultural relevance of various foods and food practices and a useful guide to Indian food tools and techniques. Novices to this cuisine (like myself) diving into this book will probably find a need to stock up on some specialized equipment, but that's not critical for each recipe. Used in-depth, this book constitutes a thorough introduction to cookin This book lives up to its reputation as a definitive Western text on Indian cooking. The multitudinous recipes are complemented by discussion of the cultural relevance of various foods and food practices and a useful guide to Indian food tools and techniques. Novices to this cuisine (like myself) diving into this book will probably find a need to stock up on some specialized equipment, but that's not critical for each recipe. Used in-depth, this book constitutes a thorough introduction to cooking as a whole, and the resources list is still useful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Prabhu

    Considered by many Gaudiya Vaishnava communities to be the Gold Standard of temple cookbooks. Jamuna DD was a very high devotee of Srila Prabhupada, this book contains an intense collection of recipes, stories, charts and just really vast treasure trove of information surrounding the transformation of bhoga into prasadam. So many absolutely essential preparations of Indian and Bengali vegetarian food that is prepared as gifts to be offered to Deities of the Lord in various forms. Dals, Sabjis, S Considered by many Gaudiya Vaishnava communities to be the Gold Standard of temple cookbooks. Jamuna DD was a very high devotee of Srila Prabhupada, this book contains an intense collection of recipes, stories, charts and just really vast treasure trove of information surrounding the transformation of bhoga into prasadam. So many absolutely essential preparations of Indian and Bengali vegetarian food that is prepared as gifts to be offered to Deities of the Lord in various forms. Dals, Sabjis, Sak, fries, sweets, breads, rices, bitters.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cedar

    This is by far my favorite cookbook. I have only had it for about two months, but have made quite a few dishes already. Everyone I have made these recipes for are in awe, and shocked when I tell them how easy making Indian food really is. The recipes are well written, easy to follow, and the author goes in to great detail about methods, ingredients, and everything you need to know about making Indian food!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    I cooked my way through _LKC_ much of 1996, 1997, and 1998 and still turn to it with affection (though I often add onions and garlic). It's by far the most battered, stained, and annotated volume in my large cookbook collection.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    The edition I borrowed from the library was formatted inconveniently for a cookbook. It was like a very thick hardcover novel-sized book. The book wouldn't stay open and there were no pictures. They could improve the book immensely by making it bigger, editing out some recipes, and adding some pictures of the dishes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    This book is an encyclopedia volume of EVERYTHING related to Vaishnava kitchens. Many things will be too involved for your basic cook, but the plethora of recipes and ideas and techniques are a must for any serious vegetarian Indian cook. Love the little Vaishnava elements.

  12. 5 out of 5

    barbecube

    This book is worth it just for the chapter on sweets. There's great stuff in every section, although it's so dense and so comprehensive that the gems are hard to find, and its reliance on hing as a substitute for alliums (pursuant to a religious restriction) is unappealing to me and demands that some recipes be adapted to revert them. I treasure this document and it will serve me well for many years. But, the sweets. Indian sweets are laborious and tricky to make, often involving long cooking times This book is worth it just for the chapter on sweets. There's great stuff in every section, although it's so dense and so comprehensive that the gems are hard to find, and its reliance on hing as a substitute for alliums (pursuant to a religious restriction) is unappealing to me and demands that some recipes be adapted to revert them. I treasure this document and it will serve me well for many years. But, the sweets. Indian sweets are laborious and tricky to make, often involving long cooking times and delicate processing of dairy. Lord Krishna's Cuisine walks you through a broad selection of these delicate processes with precise and detailed instructions, and every one of its sweet recipes that I've tried has succeeded. It gives one a great feeling of confidence. The main reason that I don't star it more generously is, due to its strict ingredient prohibitions, it disregards a deep well of delicious foods that do include meat, as well as those with onion and garlic as prominent ingredients, and this creates a necessity to look to other sources to create a balanced nonvegetarian table. In addition, the author is firmly Hindu and after some investigation it becomes clear that she is, perhaps accidentally, failing to address Parsi, Muslim, and perhaps other non-Hindu food traditions of India. Despite the work's thoroughness and immensity, it's still got some missing parts.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    One of the best Indian cook books ever written. Devi's book is a compendium of vedic vegetarian recipes. And to be honest, I didn't even realize that the recipes had no onions or garlic until an Indian friend pointed it out. I am a HUGE fan of garlic and onions (HUGE HUGE!) but still, I absolutely love this cookbook. The recipes are exquisite, though admittedly they are often very complex. But if you want to cook a vegetarian feast some weekend, check this book out from your local library and sp One of the best Indian cook books ever written. Devi's book is a compendium of vedic vegetarian recipes. And to be honest, I didn't even realize that the recipes had no onions or garlic until an Indian friend pointed it out. I am a HUGE fan of garlic and onions (HUGE HUGE!) but still, I absolutely love this cookbook. The recipes are exquisite, though admittedly they are often very complex. But if you want to cook a vegetarian feast some weekend, check this book out from your local library and spend a day in the kitchen. Some favorites: Sesame Yogurt Potatoes, Curried Cabbage with Tender Whole Mung Beans, Clear Soup with Spinach and Rice, Cucumber and Coconut in Dill Yogurt Cream, Panir Cheese (yes, you can make your own cheese!) and Green Peas in Mint Tomato Sauce.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love cookbooks, but don't usually review them. However, I went out today and bought my fifth copy of this book--the other three having been given to friends who liked some recipe or another. This is the only cookbook I cannot do without--and I am not even a tiny bit Indian. It's a cook's education in a single volume, with more information about basic techniques, the blending of flavors, and cooking with whole, natural foods that I've ever found.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    very good instructions on making sweets and dairy products like chenna and paneer, although i think the vedic style of indian cooking sometimes overuses the known digestive spices. not EVERYTHING needs ginger. geez. but other than that, excellent. good index and hindi-english ingredient list. this lady apparently doesn't like onions, which i think is weird.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I have this in an earlier large format paperback edition. I am not vegetarian, I am not Indian, however this book encapsulates everything that makes vegetarian Indian cuisine exciting to a carnivore. A fabulous book, filled with great recipes and everything you need to know about preparation of all vegetarian foods.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    I read cookbooks more than I read fiction. This is the scariest cookbook I own: hardly any pictures, about 1700 pages long, and no bacon. This is why I haven't tackled it yet, but it has a lot of promise.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Haven't tried many recipes yet, but what I have tried I liked. I stumbled across it at a discount book store and grabbed it because it was cheap and looked interesting. It's a huge cookbook with tons of recipes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I'm not sure you ever finish reading this book but I love Indian food and have learned to cook several dishes because of it. All dishes are vegetarian and most ingredients can be food at your local Whole Foods or an Indian grocery store.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Neha

    Excellent vegetarian cookbook. Many of the recipes are traditional, home-style cooking that I grew up learning how to make. Each one turns out great if you follow the recipe exactly, which is awesome.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    Very Americanized, even the spices are not normal ones that we use in our Indian kitchens. Also common simple recipes are not there in the book. Most of them have weird names, just to make a commonly made recipe sound exotic.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen Aleta

    If you follow the recipes carefully, you can make restaurant-quality food. The curried cauliflower and potatoes is now part of my repertoire. I also learned to make Raita that was out of this world.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vali

    This cook book is definitely impressive. But although I have managed to make some delicious meals from its recipes, this book is not for the beginner cook. Perhaps when I become more accomplished I can give it more stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Yum. Finally a recipe for Lemon Rice that I love almost as much as my host mom's. That recipe alone changed my life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    This book is not only beautiful to look at, it is absolutely filled with almost any Indian vegetarian dish you could ever hope to make. So far everything we've made out of it is fabulous.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Great guide to cooking beans, lots of new types of recipes for me. I love the text interspersed with helpful tips - I kind of like how they are sort of poorly organized.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ailsa Ek

    The most useful cookbook in my collection, even rates above my vintage Joy of Cooking.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Not just a cookbook, but a comprehensive manual on Indian cooking. The recipes are delicious, if sometimes complicated, but the explanatory notes are worth the price of the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking by Yamuna Devi (1987)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Terry Leong

    Learning about Indian vegetarian cuisine...This is a very thick cook book.

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