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Shades of Black: A Celebration of Our Children

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Photographs and poetic text celebrate the beauty and diversity of African American children.


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Photographs and poetic text celebrate the beauty and diversity of African American children.

30 review for Shades of Black: A Celebration of Our Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    I am black. I am unique. Let's talk about racism! Ah, yes, I can see you heading for the exit already. That's okay, I totally get it. It's a rough topic. For those of you still with me: How do you teach a child about racism or tell him/her about it? I don't know. I don't have a flippin' clue. If you are related (biologically or not, parent or not or aunt or cousin or grandma or whatever) to a child who is (insert any race/ethnicity here), then you are going to have to deal with this at some point. I am black. I am unique. Let's talk about racism! Ah, yes, I can see you heading for the exit already. That's okay, I totally get it. It's a rough topic. For those of you still with me: How do you teach a child about racism or tell him/her about it? I don't know. I don't have a flippin' clue. If you are related (biologically or not, parent or not or aunt or cousin or grandma or whatever) to a child who is (insert any race/ethnicity here), then you are going to have to deal with this at some point. And it crushes your heart. How can you even WRAP YOUR BRAIN around the fact that this child - this amazing, wonderful, funny, smart child whom you LOVE - is going to be hated and feared and taunted and made to feel like shit because they are black/Chinese/Indian/Jewish/Mexican/Puerto Rican/Thai/Vietnamese etc. etc. etc. etc. ad infinitum? And WHEN do you deal with this? Do you just wait until someone calls the child a _____ (<---insert ethnic/racial slur here)? And then tell the crying confused child about racism? Or do you do a pre-emptive strike - pulling the kid aside early, before it even occurs to him/her that his/her value is based on his/her skin color and/or ethnic makeup - and telling them, "Listen, Jack/Jill - people are going to hate you because you're black. It's just a fact of life."? I am NOT a fan of soul-crushing pre-emptive strikes, I do NOT think this is the way to go - but I never rarely tell anyone how to parent, so I mean... you've gotta do whatever you think is best. I do think talking with your child from infancy about race and preparing them as best they can for a hateful world is a smart and prudent thing to do. Your child is going to be called a racist slur. SHE/HE IS GOING TO BE CALLED A RACIST SLUR, there's no point pretending like this isn't going to happen. It is best (IMO) to speak to your child, talk to your child about race. I wish I could tell you that there is some place - some country, some town, some magical kingdom - where your adored child could live free and clear of racism and prejudice. But no such place exists. Anyone who tells you racism is dead or that we live in a post-racial society is fucking lying to you. Or they are very, very sheltered. Children are still often raised up by their parents to have racist attitudes, I have seen it with my own two eyes much more than I'd care to count. This book backs another way. A picture book that a.) recognizes racial identity (unlike the billions of children's books that just pretend race doesn't exist as a concept in our society) and b.) instills pride and acceptance of the way a child's skin/hair/eyes look. This is a more positive version of the pre-emptive strike I mentioned earlier. Instead of taking your little loved one aside and telling him/her "the world is going to hurt you," you are already arming him/her with some kind of knowledge and defense. I mean, the words "I am black. I am unique." are pretty fucking powerful, and they are repeated often in this book. It's got a great ring to it. ... The book is super-short and I'll break it down for you. The first part focuses on skin color. All shades of black are discussed from a kid who is "the creamy white frost in vanilla ice cream" to a kid who is "the midnight blue in a licorice stick." Yes, all the skin colors are compared to a food, which is being held by whatever kid is being discussed. (I fucking HATE when skin colors are compared to food. I'm trying to overlook this here.) The second part focuses on hair textures, which range from "the soft puffs in a cotton ball" to "the twisted corkscrew in a rope." Again, each page features an adorable child with whichever type of hair is being discussed. The book also clearly states "All of my hair is good." Which is a great message. The final part of the book focuses on eye color: brown, green, blue and black. Each child with each eye color is holding a precious stone which matches their eye color (for example, the little blue-eyed girl is holding handfuls of lapis lazuli). The final page is a picture of all the children together in a big group, laughing, and states: I am Black. I am Unique. I come from ancient Kings and Queens. When you look at me, what do you see? I am Black. I am proud to be me. This is a board book and suitable for kids as young as one and a half. I would go up to age 4, or maybe 5 depending on the child, but I don't know many five-year-olds who would think this is interesting. It's a "baby book." This book only covers black children. We definitely need ones that cover Indian, Latino, Asian, etc. children because judging people on what shade your skin is is NOT just a black thing. Dark Indians, dark Latinos, dark Asians etc. etc. etc. are also judged and hated. It would be great to have different editions of this book for all different kinds of backgrounds. Now. You have to do whatever you think is best re: raising or caring for your niece/nephew/grandson/daughter etc. etc. etc. in this sometimes harsh and judgmental world. I liked this book, but I know not everyone is going to agree or is going to want to go this route. I am not saying I know the answers or that I know a secret to making sure the child ends up happy and well-adjusted and prepared to deal with racists. A lot of people will probably shy away from introducing their kids to racial concepts at such a young age - whether the kid is white, black, whatever - and I don't have the authority to say "this is good" or "this is bad." YOU have to make that call. What I WILL say is that just because this book deals with black children doesn't mean it is only appropriate for loving relatives of black children. Any child of any race/background could be read this book or be introduced to this book. Let's not limit ourselves here. LOL :) Okay, enough seriousness. I'm going back to reading my thriller novel. P.S. Added pictures 12/28/2015 http://c2.q-assets.com/images/product... http://c3.q-assets.com/images/product...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Abbery Milhouse-cunningham

    Shades of black is a beautiful pictorial depiction of African American diversity. The book is geared towards younger children, more specifically African American children. However, this book can be enjoyed by students of all races. This non-fiction book is full of photos, and there are sentences alongside the pictures. Sentences like "I am Black; I am Unique; I am the creamy white frost in vanilla ice cream" directs the reader's attention to the children in the photo. This book does not contain Shades of black is a beautiful pictorial depiction of African American diversity. The book is geared towards younger children, more specifically African American children. However, this book can be enjoyed by students of all races. This non-fiction book is full of photos, and there are sentences alongside the pictures. Sentences like "I am Black; I am Unique; I am the creamy white frost in vanilla ice cream" directs the reader's attention to the children in the photo. This book does not contain a traditional story-line with characters. However, the children, who are in the pictures, tell the story through their actions in pictures. For example, themes of confidence, unity, and diversity are placed in a positive light. This book also highlights the reality that differences are okay and beautiful. This is a great message for all children, because every child has something that makes them different from others. As a teacher, I will encourage my students to stand out and not conform to society's standards, because there is individuality in diversity. More specifically, this book can encourage African American students. Typically, the African American race is viewed in a negative light. At a young age, many African American children grow up seeing every other race portrayed positively in society but their own. They can relate to the children in this book, because they have similar skin hues, hair types, eye colors, etc. Furthermore, this book would primary be for younger students, who are in grades Pre-K through first. Students in these grades are typically visual learners, which is great since the book contains so many pictures. Students can interact with this book by drawing a picture that depicts their outer appearance. This will be a great activity for children to do, because it is important for them to become acquainted and content with how they look. This will help build high self-esteem. The author, Sandra Pinkney, is an African American female writer, who has won numerous awards. Her husband Myles Pinkney captured the photographs for this book. They work great together. They simplified the language of this book for the children; however, the meaning was not compromise. Lastly, the two of them can relate to the cultural group in this book, because they are apart of the African America race/culture.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ch_ebonysmith

    “I am black, I am unique” is the phrase from Shades of Black, a book about the diverse shades of American Americans. The book is good to embrace the different shades black people are because there are so many variations of African Americans skin tones. Some children may be not be self confident because of their skin tones, knowing that there are many people that have the same skintone may help the children. There are actual pictures are children celebrating their skintones “midnight blue” meanin “I am black, I am unique” is the phrase from Shades of Black, a book about the diverse shades of American Americans. The book is good to embrace the different shades black people are because there are so many variations of African Americans skin tones. Some children may be not be self confident because of their skin tones, knowing that there are many people that have the same skintone may help the children. There are actual pictures are children celebrating their skintones “midnight blue” meaning a darker shade. Orange like a peach or copper brown like a pretzel. It is great to have books that celebrate being proud of your race, culture, and so on. This book is for very young readers (3 to 7), but the message has no age limit. Being black and proud is wonderful. Being any race and being proud is wonderful. Children need to be taught there are great and wonderful just the way they are. It can be hard to find books that are great to bring race in the class. This book can be utilized to help children embrace their uniqueness. Also, the book can be a kid friendly way to talk about race for other children other than African American children. One interesting fact about the book is that there are photographs of the authors children. It also won the NAACP Image Award in 2001.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    For me, this is a beautiful book that serves an important role in my work with young children. "Shades of Black", geared specifically for young children 2 to 7 years of age, explores physical diversity within the Black identity, highlighting the many shades of Black skin with text such as “I am the velvety orange in a peach/and the coppery brown in a pretzel,” before looking at differences in the characteristics of hair (“My hair is the soft puffs/in a cotton ball/and the stiff ringlets in lambs For me, this is a beautiful book that serves an important role in my work with young children. "Shades of Black", geared specifically for young children 2 to 7 years of age, explores physical diversity within the Black identity, highlighting the many shades of Black skin with text such as “I am the velvety orange in a peach/and the coppery brown in a pretzel,” before looking at differences in the characteristics of hair (“My hair is the soft puffs/in a cotton ball/and the stiff ringlets in lambs wool”) and eye color (“My eyes are the delicate streaks of amber in a Tiger’s-Eye/…and the shimmering glow of ebony in an Onyx”). After each set of explorations, the refrain “I am Black/I am Unique” is repeated. The poetic phrasing suggests that there is no “correct” way to be Black, but many ways, all of which are beautiful and worthy of feeling pride. The importance of a text like "Shades of Black" thus serves (at least) two purposes. First, for children of color (in this case particularly Blacks) it serves to honor and validate their identities through both image and language. The book provides children with prose that speaks to their own life experiences with respect and dignity and supports the development of pride, empowerment, and a sense of equality in defiance of the dominant discourse of racial oppression and White privilege. Second, for White children, the text provides positive images of others that serve to help break down stereotypes and conceptions that support White superiority and entitlement. In addition, the book beautifully provides photographs of real children, rather than illustrations, and text written in lovely poetry, a genre too often lacking in children's books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    This is a simple picture book, but the vocabulary offers a chance to grow your word wall (e.g. unique, velvety, coppery, radiant, ringlets, amber, luster, Unakite, brilliant, Lapis, shimmering, ebony, Onyx, ancient). This book is a great way to tie art into literature. The color specificity can be used to move beyond primary colors into a broader range of naming colors and using colors (i.e. with crayons, colored pencils, water colors or paint). After a read aloud of the entire book and showing This is a simple picture book, but the vocabulary offers a chance to grow your word wall (e.g. unique, velvety, coppery, radiant, ringlets, amber, luster, Unakite, brilliant, Lapis, shimmering, ebony, Onyx, ancient). This book is a great way to tie art into literature. The color specificity can be used to move beyond primary colors into a broader range of naming colors and using colors (i.e. with crayons, colored pencils, water colors or paint). After a read aloud of the entire book and showing every page, all students can create realistic self portraits with the expectation that they go beyond primary colors into the broader hues available to depict themselves. The Art teacher may want to join you for formal discussion of artistic elements that help make portraits realistic (if you work together to find your big theme(s) you've got an integrated lesson opportunity). All children will have a chance to discuss color as a description, rather than as a definition. Note that readers (listeners) cannot rightly claim to know anything about the children shown. We don't know what language they speak, what their religion is, what their favorite book is, if they play sports, etc. All we see is descriptions of their appearance. We need more information in order to know these children as people. Be ready to talk about the children in the book that some students might think of as white. This provides an opportunity to emphasize social customs used to get to know strangers and to make new friends. If we would like to know something about someone, we could simply ask. But we must do so in a respectful way.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Walida

    Pinkney uses beautiful similes and matching photos of each child. This book celebrates the many attributes of African American children. Shades of Black invites readers of all ages and gives them a chance to explore and embrace the diversity of African Americans. I think every classroom should have a copy of this book. This book can be used as a Multicultural lesson as well as a Self Esteem building tool for children. Learning can be extended through discussion about diversity. Children make dist Pinkney uses beautiful similes and matching photos of each child. This book celebrates the many attributes of African American children. Shades of Black invites readers of all ages and gives them a chance to explore and embrace the diversity of African Americans. I think every classroom should have a copy of this book. This book can be used as a Multicultural lesson as well as a Self Esteem building tool for children. Learning can be extended through discussion about diversity. Children make distinctions between members of the same racial or cultural group by age 4; they also develop social skills and becoming more group-oriented. They enjoy exploring the culture of their friends. By age 5, most children understand the concept of fair and unfair, and they often use these concepts as they try to deal with issues. Learning extensions for Preschoolers Skin-Color Match-Ups Set out a number of nylon knee-high stockings in various shades, tan, black, white, pink, yellow, and red. Encourage children to try them on their hands and arms or their legs and feet. Ask questions to help the children increase their awareness of skin color. For example, "Can you find a stocking that is the same color as your skin?" Or "What color is that stocking you have on your arm?" Ask the children to "Try the _________ stocking. Is it lighter or darker than your own skin?" Tell the children no one's skin color is really white, pink, yellow, or red. Emphasize that skin-color differences are interesting and desirable. http://www.pbs.org/kcts/preciouschild...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cerita

    This book is wonderful for not only black children, but children of other races as well. I think it would help children understand that even though you are labeled as a certain race everyone is still unique with their own special features and skin color shades. The descriptive vocabulary in used great for vocabulary development and giving a connection for children to relate to in order to understand the concept of the book. I like the fact that pictures of real children and real items are used a This book is wonderful for not only black children, but children of other races as well. I think it would help children understand that even though you are labeled as a certain race everyone is still unique with their own special features and skin color shades. The descriptive vocabulary in used great for vocabulary development and giving a connection for children to relate to in order to understand the concept of the book. I like the fact that pictures of real children and real items are used also. Extension Activity: I would take a picture of each child and put it on their own piece of construction paper. The pictures would be somewhat small so that they will be able to write, draw, or paste pictures up under them. As they look at their own picture I would tell them try to think of an item or color they feel their skin matches with. Then I would give them each a magazine to look through to see if they can find an item in it that matches their skin color. They will cut it out and paste it under their picture. If they can not find a picture in the magazine they can draw a picture of an item that matches their skin color then write down the name of the item next to it. I will ask each child to explain the reasons for their choices and help them come up with descriptive adjectives for the color or item they chose. They would then write that word on top of the item name.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Arissa

    This book was a short read and focused on the diversity in the African-American community with photos of children. It contained a variety of children which all types of skin tones which they were celebrated. The book did not only cover skin complexions but also referred to hair and eye color. Shades of Black is a book that is affirming to young African-American children in a positive light with the writing that was introduced explains the diversity in this community. This book explores and conne This book was a short read and focused on the diversity in the African-American community with photos of children. It contained a variety of children which all types of skin tones which they were celebrated. The book did not only cover skin complexions but also referred to hair and eye color. Shades of Black is a book that is affirming to young African-American children in a positive light with the writing that was introduced explains the diversity in this community. This book explores and connects skin tones to food and everyday items. Shades of Black can be used to teach children about diversity in a community and explain to them that everyone is beautiful no matter thee color of their skin. The book uses photographs instead of drawings giving a child a realistic view on this topic and students can explore key details using the adjectives in the story. This book is appropriate for first grade and up. The author Sandra L. Pickney and her husband wrote the book together and her children are also featured in the photographs of the book as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Wood

    “I am black, I am unique” is the phrase from Shades of Black, a book about the diverse shades of American Americans. The book is good to embrace the different shades black people are because there are so many variations of African Americans skin tones. Some children may be not be self confident because of their skin tones, knowing that there are many people that have the same skintone may help the children. There are many pictures of children celebrating their skintones “midnight blue” meaning a “I am black, I am unique” is the phrase from Shades of Black, a book about the diverse shades of American Americans. The book is good to embrace the different shades black people are because there are so many variations of African Americans skin tones. Some children may be not be self confident because of their skin tones, knowing that there are many people that have the same skintone may help the children. There are many pictures of children celebrating their skintones “midnight blue” meaning a darker shade. Orange like a peach or copper brown like a pretzel. It is great to have books that celebrate being proud of race and culture. the book contains many many describing words that let the reader know the different colors of skin tones as well as the different hair types such as curly or straight, ringlets etc. Full of rich vocabulary words in a way that is easy for children to understand. Great book for all ages of children!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rosita

    I really enjoy this book it encourages children to know their identity how to love their own skin as they are. This a great book to show children the texture of hair, eyes, and beauty. The children in the book describe different shades of eyes and skin. The children can celebrate that they are unique with shades of black. I really enjoy the book states "I am black and unique It identify its children's character. The children will be proud of themselves. This book is an African American for child I really enjoy this book it encourages children to know their identity how to love their own skin as they are. This a great book to show children the texture of hair, eyes, and beauty. The children in the book describe different shades of eyes and skin. The children can celebrate that they are unique with shades of black. I really enjoy the book states "I am black and unique It identify its children's character. The children will be proud of themselves. This book is an African American for children to know who's they are as well to loved thyself. Learning Expericence: The teacher will have a large white or yellow paper, black markers, and a student: to trace him/her on the paper that the be lay on the floor of the classroom. The children can paste different and colorful items as yards, jewelry, fabric, magazines, and stickers with markers or crayon.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shaquita

    I loved reading this book because it encourages children to love the skin they are in; it let children know they are unique and the should embrace it. This book also teaches an appreciation of the different cultures in the world. I also liked the author's descriptions of the different shades of the skin and eyes, as well as, the textures of hair. Learning Experience: Children will make rainbow of friends. I will have children illustrate a picture of themselves using different materials(i.e. yarn I loved reading this book because it encourages children to love the skin they are in; it let children know they are unique and the should embrace it. This book also teaches an appreciation of the different cultures in the world. I also liked the author's descriptions of the different shades of the skin and eyes, as well as, the textures of hair. Learning Experience: Children will make rainbow of friends. I will have children illustrate a picture of themselves using different materials(i.e. yarn, buttons, beads, etc.). After the children are done we will discuss the many different features that we have that make us all unique; the we will place the pictures on the wall to construct a rainbow of friends.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bridgit

    Grade/interest level: Primary Reading level: not found (lexile.com) Genre: informational Main Characters: n/a Setting: n/a POV: third person, narrator "Shades of Black" is a great read-aloud for Primary grades. The author uses phographs to compare the hair, eyes, and skin color of various Black children, making each shade/color/texture a unique and beautiful thing. This is a great book to share with young children, noting the diversity within a race and the uniqueness within us all. This is a great w Grade/interest level: Primary Reading level: not found (lexile.com) Genre: informational Main Characters: n/a Setting: n/a POV: third person, narrator "Shades of Black" is a great read-aloud for Primary grades. The author uses phographs to compare the hair, eyes, and skin color of various Black children, making each shade/color/texture a unique and beautiful thing. This is a great book to share with young children, noting the diversity within a race and the uniqueness within us all. This is a great way to restructure the way children see their differences and see and treat each other. I would use this to set classroom expecatations and learn about diversity. My only critique is that I wish there was more text speaking to diversity and differences.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Stewart

    I absolutely love this book. I am a woman of color and this book as opened my eyes to see how many different shades a person of color can be. There is no concrete color as black there are shades in between. I can be the golden brown complexion of sugar and my hair can be as straight as a blade of grass because I am unique. I think this book sets a beautiful tone for all children of any color to see we are all beautiful and unique. I think this book could be read to all ages. It’s never too early I absolutely love this book. I am a woman of color and this book as opened my eyes to see how many different shades a person of color can be. There is no concrete color as black there are shades in between. I can be the golden brown complexion of sugar and my hair can be as straight as a blade of grass because I am unique. I think this book sets a beautiful tone for all children of any color to see we are all beautiful and unique. I think this book could be read to all ages. It’s never too early to teach a child how to see beauty in many different shades.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    Great presentation! Fun transition in with a song and using a literacy prop to read road. Catherine's lesson was based on new words and words that are similar or different. She kept everyone interested by asking question about how people are different and questions related to the book. she discussed the pictures in the book and how they are similar to those in the class. Her learning experience allows children to think. Two children will look at pictures of each other and discuss the similaritie Great presentation! Fun transition in with a song and using a literacy prop to read road. Catherine's lesson was based on new words and words that are similar or different. She kept everyone interested by asking question about how people are different and questions related to the book. she discussed the pictures in the book and how they are similar to those in the class. Her learning experience allows children to think. Two children will look at pictures of each other and discuss the similarities and differences.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Josiah Smith

    a book that shows the diversity and uniqueness of individuals. A book written about the authors children all of different colours, races, genders, and backgrounds; but, all are considered their children. A creative usage of adjectives and colours and about colours. A powerful; statement book that shows we are all important and unique and that that is OK. A nice use of stones (lapis) to describe themselves. wonderful illustrations and an enjoyable read for children and parents/guardians/caregiver a book that shows the diversity and uniqueness of individuals. A book written about the authors children all of different colours, races, genders, and backgrounds; but, all are considered their children. A creative usage of adjectives and colours and about colours. A powerful; statement book that shows we are all important and unique and that that is OK. A nice use of stones (lapis) to describe themselves. wonderful illustrations and an enjoyable read for children and parents/guardians/caregivers.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Lewis

    Shades of black is a beautiful pictorial depiction of African American diversity. This book has themes of confidence, unity, and diversity that are placed in a positive light. This book also highlights the reality that differences are okay and beautiful and to embrace the different shades black people are because there are so many variations of African Americans skin tones. This book can be used as a Multicultural lesson as well as a Self Esteem building tool for children.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Breona Taylor

    Great book for a teacher to use to teach diversity, and teaching that everyone is diverse/unique. Great for teaching children to be confident within themselves. Good book for teaching children to be proud of what they are and how they look. I really liked how it talked about skin tones, hair types, and eye color. Great for all children, not just brown children. loved, loved, loved this book- the photographs were gorgeous and I absolutely loved how the book was worded!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elise Xuereb

    This book, Shades of Black, compares different skin tones, eye color, and hair textures of Afro/American/black children to everyday items such as peaches, brown sugar chocolate, etc. or natural things such as stones, minerals, or ice cream. This book uses adjectives to describe the many characteristics of these children. It teaches children about diversity, how everyone is different and that is OK. Each child is beautiful in their own way. Genre: Culture

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kenia Soto

    Shades of Black is a great book for teachers to have in their class. It not only shows the many shades of African Americans but also how they differ from eye color, hair texture and color. It is flooded with new vocabulary for children to learn such as the various colors of rocks and adjectives used to describe their hair, skin tone, and eye color. Amazing book to teach diversity even within the African American culture.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bunty Jah

    Shades of Black: A Celebration of Our Children this book was very interesting this is a bokk every teacher should have a copy. Children learn about differences and similarities in each other. It also teaches about diversity and encouarge children to be their selves. Lots of new vocabulary works to introduce to preschoolers. I love this book and will read it again. The colors and pictures was really good. Kudos to the author

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ayana

    The book is very unique the illustrations of the different children skin tone and hair textures is depicted in a great way and the use and examples of comparison to real objects is great. My only issue is the use of the word "Black". I would have preferred another word like shades of " Mahogany". The book is very unique the illustrations of the different children skin tone and hair textures is depicted in a great way and the use and examples of comparison to real objects is great. My only issue is the use of the word "Black". I would have preferred another word like shades of " Mahogany".

  22. 4 out of 5

    Agnes Mukoro

    The book was written by Sandra Pinkney, and was published on January 2006. It is about African-American beauty, and emphasized on acceptance of their heritage , it discusses the various traits and complexions that make the African -American unique. The book uses simple poetic language and it promote language and literacy development.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nefertiti

    I think this book could help children to understand that we are all different but alike in many ways. This can help children to learn acceptance of one another, and the value of being unique. All the children in the book were beautiful however, the book itself the way it was designed was not that fun to look at. I would recommend this book to parents and teachers of children over the age of 4.

  24. 5 out of 5

    K.

    Definitely, on my list of highly recommended books for parents with children of color! It shows them that we come in all different shades, have all different hair textures, eyes colors and still we are each unique and beautiful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Keren

    Great book to encourage young black youth to embrace their features. I love how it shoed that with all the differences that we have we are still one in the same. A good read for mulicultrual children coming from mixed back grounds.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Justyna Johns

    A beautiful book about diversity in a group of African-American children. With teaching most of the children about being black or white, this books allows children to find the right words when describing the self.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Donna Smith

    I love this book. Not only does it help children of color identify who they are as a culture, it teach self-esteem as well. Another aspect this book brings to light is comparison, such as the color of eyes and what its compared to, their hair and what its compared to. Great book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jazzmin Baldwin

    This book is great during black history month as well as any day. It teaches children about description and broad vocabulary. Its also great to make a child feel good about what he/she may look like. I recommend this book for ages 3 and up. So many art projects and lessons I could think of.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephany

    I am black, I am unique! Is the phrase if this book! Teaches children to embrace different shades of black, teaches them every color is unique and they should be proud. Good for learning experiences with shades of skin.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy Buthelezi

    This book embodies diversity as it points out differences in complexion, hair, eye color, etc., between various children of African American descent. I think this is important because children need to know about their ancestry and where they come from, even if it is from a variety of places! In the future, I would read this book to my own biracial children to teach them to be proud of their uniqueness. I like this book because it builds children's self-esteem and teaches them that although they This book embodies diversity as it points out differences in complexion, hair, eye color, etc., between various children of African American descent. I think this is important because children need to know about their ancestry and where they come from, even if it is from a variety of places! In the future, I would read this book to my own biracial children to teach them to be proud of their uniqueness. I like this book because it builds children's self-esteem and teaches them that although they may look much different from each other, they have a lot in common.

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