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The Comics Go to Hell: A Visual History of the Devil in Comics

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by Fredrik Str�mberg The Devil is one of the most potent and longest-lived icons in the history of human civilization. It is therefore not a big surprise that images of the Prince of Darkness are so abundant in comics - a medium that by its nature builds upon the communicative powers of icons. In this book, author Fredrik Str�mberg examines how cartoonists through the ages by Fredrik Str�mberg The Devil is one of the most potent and longest-lived icons in the history of human civilization. It is therefore not a big surprise that images of the Prince of Darkness are so abundant in comics - a medium that by its nature builds upon the communicative powers of icons. In this book, author Fredrik Str�mberg examines how cartoonists through the ages have used the myths about the Devil, in a wide variety of ways. Comics featured in this book include, among others: the infamous Jack T. Chick tracts, Hellblazer, Love & Rockets, The Checkered Demon, Donald Duck, Mephisto, Dilbert, The New Adventures of Jesus, Stray Toasters, The Demon, Futurama, Preacher, Hot Stuff - The Little Devil, Castle Waiting, Sandman, The Book of Leviathan, Swamp Thing, Dragon Ball, Spawn, Silver Surfer, Picture Stories from the Bible, Uncanny X-Men, Tintin, Sshhhh!, and Lady Death. Like Str�mberg's previous book from Fantagraphics, Black Images in the Comics, this book is designed for maximum browsability, with each spread featuring a short (but informative!) essay on a comic next to a representative panel of the work at hand. HC, 6x6, 360pg, b&w


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by Fredrik Str�mberg The Devil is one of the most potent and longest-lived icons in the history of human civilization. It is therefore not a big surprise that images of the Prince of Darkness are so abundant in comics - a medium that by its nature builds upon the communicative powers of icons. In this book, author Fredrik Str�mberg examines how cartoonists through the ages by Fredrik Str�mberg The Devil is one of the most potent and longest-lived icons in the history of human civilization. It is therefore not a big surprise that images of the Prince of Darkness are so abundant in comics - a medium that by its nature builds upon the communicative powers of icons. In this book, author Fredrik Str�mberg examines how cartoonists through the ages have used the myths about the Devil, in a wide variety of ways. Comics featured in this book include, among others: the infamous Jack T. Chick tracts, Hellblazer, Love & Rockets, The Checkered Demon, Donald Duck, Mephisto, Dilbert, The New Adventures of Jesus, Stray Toasters, The Demon, Futurama, Preacher, Hot Stuff - The Little Devil, Castle Waiting, Sandman, The Book of Leviathan, Swamp Thing, Dragon Ball, Spawn, Silver Surfer, Picture Stories from the Bible, Uncanny X-Men, Tintin, Sshhhh!, and Lady Death. Like Str�mberg's previous book from Fantagraphics, Black Images in the Comics, this book is designed for maximum browsability, with each spread featuring a short (but informative!) essay on a comic next to a representative panel of the work at hand. HC, 6x6, 360pg, b&w

42 review for The Comics Go to Hell: A Visual History of the Devil in Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    I really enjoyed this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David James

    It's a well known fact that the Devil is a hell of a lot more fun than God, and that's one of the reasons he makes far more appearances in art and literature than the presumed good guy. Comics combine art and literature in a low brow sort of way, and the Devil has been careening through them pretty much from the start. This collection of images drawn from a wide range of comics, and even reaching back into medieval times, offers a breezy overview of how humans, particularly in the West, conceive It's a well known fact that the Devil is a hell of a lot more fun than God, and that's one of the reasons he makes far more appearances in art and literature than the presumed good guy. Comics combine art and literature in a low brow sort of way, and the Devil has been careening through them pretty much from the start. This collection of images drawn from a wide range of comics, and even reaching back into medieval times, offers a breezy overview of how humans, particularly in the West, conceive of Satan. It's a fun book, easily read in one sitting, and one needn't be a comic book geek to enjoy it. The book would earn four stars except for one drawback: it's horribly edited. Typos abound, words are clearly missing from the text, and early on the creation of the Persian Devil under Zoroastrianism is mistakenly placed in 1000 A.D. Yikes. That should have been B.C. (or, to be more in keeping with present dating, B.C.E.) Additionally, the reproduced pages would have worked better if they had been printed in color, and one of the reproductions was shrunk so much to fit the small size of the book that I needed a magnifying glass to read the text (and I have perfect eyesight). This isn't to say that the book isn't worth reading. It's quite enjoyable. But the presentation comes up short, and that's unfortunate, because Satan is one of the best characters to found in comics or anywhere else. The author has done well; it's Fantagraphics Books that needed to put more into this one.

  3. 4 out of 5

    A. David Lewis

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Harrigan

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Monaghan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adiputra Singgih

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lee

  10. 4 out of 5

    Str8ev

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eugene

  12. 4 out of 5

    Austin Culver

  13. 5 out of 5

    MJKF

  14. 4 out of 5

    Morbus Iff

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bob Bradshaw

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hal Johnson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Freda

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert Beerbohm

  19. 4 out of 5

    S.E. Martens

  20. 4 out of 5

    Logan Dalton

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dennis G

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  24. 4 out of 5

    corey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ricky

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alma

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brad

  29. 4 out of 5

    Titus Hjelm

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chad

  31. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  32. 4 out of 5

    Warren Moeckel

  33. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Martin

  34. 4 out of 5

    Joshlynn

  35. 5 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  36. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  37. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  38. 5 out of 5

    Afrina Emmaressem

  39. 5 out of 5

    Martin Lund

  40. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Bishop

  41. 5 out of 5

    Natalia

  42. 5 out of 5

    Laurel Narizny

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